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  • What Should I expect?

    What Should I be expect?
    Last edited by bigcollins25; 12-24-2007, 09:57 PM.

  • #2
    vehicle patrol, but UNARMED? the heck?
    sigpicMy ideal security vehicle and uniforms:

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    • #3
      It doesn't hurt to try it out. I have actually heard decent things about Securitas as far as contract outfits go. But, like any other contract gig it can depend on the office and the site.

      I wouldn't be too wild about unarmed alarm response, especially in a violent city like DC. Is the money acceptable?

      Also alarm response for only 3 sites? What do you do when there isn't an alarm? Usually when I think of alarm response, I think of dozens and dozens of sites. I did patrol at one point in time and part of my job was alarm response. We had over 100 buildings and there would be weeks that I wouldn't get one alarm call.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Ron Jessee View Post
        vehicle patrol, but UNARMED? the heck?
        Yeah thats what I was thinking.
        Last edited by bigcollins25; 12-24-2007, 09:57 PM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by bigcollins25 View Post
          Yeah thats what I was thinking.
          But the money is ok. $14 and some change an hour.

          I am just wondering if I will get a vest. Or even pepper spray.
          As far as I know I wear standard gray with 3-dotted patches all over. Also I have never seen a unarmed Securitas officer with a duty belt or vest.

          I doubt you will get a vest or pepper spray. Also, not to be picky, but if you are planning on being a US Marshal you should know how it is spelled

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          • #6
            UNARMED Alarm Response in DC? Damn that's kinda borderline stupid if you ask me.

            I wouldn't do it, and by comparison to DC I live in the sticks.

            Pls, I know how hard it for damn near anyone to get a firearm in DC, but c'mon.
            ~Super Ninja Sniper~
            Corbier's Commandos

            Nemo me impune lacessit

            Grammical and Spelling errors may occur form time to time. Yoov bin worned

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            • #7
              I am not familiar with DC (drove through it on the Interstate several time from NY to Florida) as some here are. But, it would concern me that I have virtually no way to defend myself in that environment. It is my opinion that you are asking the wrong people (us). Ask the other officers that have worked it in the past. See what they have to say about it.

              Be Safe,

              Hank
              " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

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              • #8
                Sometimes alarm response can include checking for fire, water damage, and other maintenance issues. Since it will also include burglary, you will want to avoid charging into a situation where the suspects may still be on site. You can do that by parking in an area that is close to the residence/building so that you can safely check for any obvious signs that a crime occurred or is in progress. If you have any doubts, request police assistance.
                Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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                • #9
                  Responding to alarms without a gun is very risky. When the cops respond to an alarm, they have a minimum of two squads and usually a canine. In security, you're the Lone Ranger.
                  In 30 years of security, I have drawn and pointed a revolver at a person a total of seven times. Five of them were during alarm responses.

                  Be careful!
                  "Striking terrific terror in the hearts of criminals everywhere" Since 1977.

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                  • #10
                    Add my vote to those who are concerned about unarmed alarm response. While it's true that the majority of alarms are false, this is gradually becoming LESS true because of the pressure alarm companies have been under to find ways to reduce false alarms. This often means redundant sensors (i.e., IR and motion) that must both signal for an alarm to trigger, and other forms of signal verification, up to and including "intelligent" systems. These improvements are all *intended* to reduce the likelihood that an alarm is false, so...

                    I also agree with Mr. Security, whether armed or not. Stand off from the site for a minute before charging in and assess the situation.

                    LOOK: If you can see evidence of forced entry to gates, fences, windows or doors, a ladder to the roof, lights moving around, a waiting "getaway" vehicle (which, oddly enough, could be nothing more than a bicycle propped up against the building) or a vehicle parked oddly close to the building, etc., are obvious signs that this is not a false alarm.

                    LISTEN: Turn off your engine, radio, and listen (hopefully, there's no external anunciator like a loud siren or alarm). Burglars sometimes make an astonishing amount of noise, unlike the silent "cat burglar" in the movies.

                    Any doubts, get backup.
                    Last edited by SecTrainer; 10-14-2007, 10:08 PM.
                    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
                      Sometimes alarm response can include checking for fire, water damage, and other maintenance issues. Since it will also include burglary, you will want to avoid charging into a situation where the suspects may still be on site. You can do that by parking in an area that is close to the residence/building so that you can safely check for any obvious signs that a crime occurred or is in progress. If you have any doubts, request police assistance.
                      That would certainly be the safest route to go, still wouldn't hurt obtaining a decent sized D cell maglite (or similar) should the SHTF

                      Often the alarm monitoring company (should it not be your own) can identify if the alarms are multiple hits or not (which would indicate more readily movement inside), seems that Securitas are hiring in a hurry though... what happened to the last SO doing this route? any chance you can 'shoot the breeze' with any of their employees prior to taking on (or not) this patrol run?
                      "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for the tips guys. I will defiantly take your advice and out it to good use

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