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Making "stops" or "contact" via vehicle.

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  • Unit6
    replied
    In ma, if i flip on my over heads (yellow and green) and the person stops thats their issue. you dont have to stop for yellows and greens, how ever if you are doing this you better have a good reason such as "Excause me ma'am, you just smashed into my patrol cars bumper." <--- True Story.

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Reminds me of the Driving Permit I got from a local police station in Thailand. It was a high risk area and I got a blank permit for $5.00 US that legally was a licence to drive back in Australia. I got pulled up coming home from the airport in Sydney for an RBT and when I produced this licence to drive, I was waved on (though I had a full licence for home).

    I can tell you now that most people who saw red and blue lights in the middle of the night and could not identify the vehicle as a LEO vehicle would be on the phone calling your 911 immediately. I know it is something I would be doing and I would be trying to get my buttocks to a cop-shop.

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  • PSOfficer
    replied
    stops

    We make contacts and stops in our community. Some examples are, neighbor disputes, juvenile curfew, not wearing a bicycle, or skateboard helmet, speeding, suspicous behavior, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    Don't quote me 100%, but I think you have to have a letter from the client, written to SLED as to why you need red and blues. I suppose they are looking for one of your contractual agreements being running traffic.
    Its not "why you need them," but the client authorizing the State of South Carolina to enforce law on those roads. The traffic statute specifies that a property owner may inform the state that they want public law enforced on their private roads.

    At that time, the security officer (as a state traffic law enforcement officer), is authorized to enforce state law on the property as it pertains to the traffic code.

    Leave a comment:


  • junkyarddog
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307 View Post
    Excuse me but I feel this way about this discussion. If a security officer wants to do traffic stops, then he should quit security, and complete the required process to become a peace officer.
    Some security officers will tell you it has absolutely nothing to do with what he wants or doesn't want, but has to do with what his client wants, as he is acting as their proxy, "Agent of the Owner". The only question for the individual really is if he is properly trained, equipped, and has sufficient legal protection provided by said owner.

    Leave a comment:


  • junkyarddog
    replied
    Originally posted by Hank1 View Post
    Jeff~
    Throughout the Country, Private Officers are doing these types of things more and more. Hang on sir! Thngs will change.

    Be Safe,

    Hank
    The growing trend is more security officers and less police officers. It is natural considering the trend towards private ownership of formerly public areas, and in many cases private leasing of public areas. The pattern is more affluent people moving to communities guarded by private security and less affluent people having no choice but to live in communities patrolled by the police. You call 9-11 and the police are absolutely not legally liable to protect you from what you are calling about, or even to respond to the call. Private security is absolutely liable to protect you from what you are calling about.

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  • gcmc security part 2
    replied
    Originally posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    Don't quote me 100%, but I think you have to have a letter from the client, written to SLED as to why you need red and blues. I suppose they are looking for one of your contractual agreements being running traffic.
    Yes,

    All it takes is the client to request it to SLED, from what I understand it's not that difficult to obtain. One of my officers worked for a company up there for years and they had a few clients that had it.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by gcmc security part 2 View Post
    Oops let me clarify, SOs in SC have all the authority of a Deputy Sheriff by statute, while on duty and on the property they are responsible for. So if you are driving in a neighborhood (gated or not), mall, hospital, etc, yes they can legally stop you by using red and blue lights, (maybe it's just blue have to double check) and write you a state uniform citation. Same exact ticket that a LEO will write you.

    The sad part is that in SC the state requires 4 hours of training for an unarmed officer and an additional 4 hours for an armed officer.
    Don't quote me 100%, but I think you have to have a letter from the client, written to SLED as to why you need red and blues. I suppose they are looking for one of your contractual agreements being running traffic.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Ok. That makes sense - thanks for the clarification.

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  • gcmc security part 2
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security View Post
    Bear with me, but are you saying that I could be driving on a public road in SC and a s/o could legally stop me for a moving violation?
    Oops let me clarify, SOs in SC have all the authority of a Deputy Sheriff by statute, while on duty and on the property they are responsible for. So if you are driving in a neighborhood (gated or not), mall, hospital, etc, yes they can legally stop you by using red and blue lights, (maybe it's just blue have to double check) and write you a state uniform citation. Same exact ticket that a LEO will write you.

    The sad part is that in SC the state requires 4 hours of training for an unarmed officer and an additional 4 hours for an armed officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Originally posted by gcmc security part 2 View Post
    Then don't do security in places like SC, (where security officers have the same statutory power as a deputy sheriff to include traffic stops) or many gated communities throughout the country. (one here does it, they actually run radar and will issue HOA tickets. Don't pay lose your driving privileges on their property.)

    There is a time and place for Security to do traffic stops. It's beginning to happen more and more, Welcome to the 21st century.
    Bear with me, but are you saying that I could be driving on a public road in SC and a s/o could legally stop me for a moving violation?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307 View Post
    Excuse me but I feel this way about this discussion. If a security officer wants to do traffic stops, then he should quit security, and complete the required process to become a peace officer.
    Jeff~
    Throughout the Country, Private Officers are doing these types of things more and more. Hang on sir! Thngs will change.

    Be Safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • gcmc security part 2
    replied
    Originally posted by jeff194307 View Post
    Excuse me but I feel this way about this discussion. If a security officer wants to do traffic stops, then he should quit security, and complete the required process to become a peace officer.
    Then don't do security in places like SC, (where security officers have the same statutory power as a deputy sheriff to include traffic stops) or many gated communities throughout the country. (one here does it, they actually run radar and will issue HOA tickets. Don't pay lose your driving privileges on their property.)

    There is a time and place for Security to do traffic stops. It's beginning to happen more and more, Welcome to the 21st century.

    Leave a comment:


  • jeff194307
    replied
    Excuse me but I feel this way about this discussion. If a security officer wants to do traffic stops, then he should quit security, and complete the required process to become a peace officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • junkyarddog
    replied
    I am going to default everything I have just said to this position:

    Don't ever pull anyone over outside your legal area of responsibility.

    1. Personal safety
    2. The Law
    3. Personal civil liability
    4. Post Orders

    There's the prioritized litmus test for any action that any S/O is uncertain of.

    And NEVER make public (like posting on a public forum) any action you do that others may consider uncertain, and which may not pass the above litmus test of other security officers, security management, or owners of security companies.

    Leave a comment:

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