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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    What is behind door #1

    One site I had to fill in for on a 3 night w/emd stint, had me counting keys as it was shutdown so no1 was around for the 3 days. I was so bored I counted the keys and put them into numerical order on all 2 main sets plus the spare and found a few spares. No1 every conducted a patrol at night but I decided I need to know if there was any HAZMAT things to worry about or I should know where emergency shutoffs were (great training not !!).

    On the 2nd night I noticed a room which had slits of bright white light poking through above and below the door frame and thought it might have been a staff gym or meal room as the building was isolated and disused apart from pallet storage. I pushed the door open to be hit with a hydroponic nursery so to speak. BUSH !!!!!!!!!! More Bush that the White House ......... and it was up to the ceiling. I looked around and quickly exited logging my patrol to the site register and counting down the time until my relief came onsite.

    He commented on about the room and said we could buy some if we wanted to. I just grabbed my bag and said goodbye. Around 2400, a new S/O came onsite unknown to me for training and was going to work o/t as well as staff had called in sick. He asked about cabins for rent down the back of the property off a back road. He pointed to a map and said cabins were for rent from the foreman for staff for $100.00 a week for cash. Power had been hooked up via the near by warehouse and water was being piped into them from the ammenities block. I signed off and drove out glad to not return again. 2 years later I was flying home for work when I read in the paper, the police raided the complex with a meth lab, 2 crops, and stolen cars.

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  • jbaerbock
    replied
    Wow they should hire me instead. Personally I make it my business to nose around every room on my rounds. So when my key didn't unlock their door I would have asked quite a few questions. Not to mention this being in a parking garage you would think patrols would have noticed them building it to begin with?

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock View Post
    By separate correspondence, you will get the latest chapter in the saga, "As the stomach turns," relating to sleeping guards at nuclear sites.
    Your "chapters" are always revelational, Bill. The best things in my email any day!

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Wait a minute, Bill. Let me get this straight. You're saying that you actually "looked around" while patrolling?? As in, opening your eyes, swiveling your head around, and all that sort of thing? Weren't you afraid that you might actually SEE something and have to file a report or DO something?

    It's a great idea, although it must have made more work for you.
    SecTrainer my lad, you caught the brass ring! I did indeed look around. Before moving to Georgia in the early 1970s, my part time work for a security company, the one who issued the blue book of rules from whom military security instructions were derived, moved me from one assignment to another. I did have reports to write and some of the folks who just wanted to sack out did not like it when I wound up on their location. As mentioned in October's post, I learned a lot, and I did have fun. I really enjoy cat and mouse games. There are some GSA Regional Managers and Building Managers who found out to their discomfort, I did look for things out of the ordinary, as we all should do.
    By separate correspondence, you will get the latest chapter in the saga, "As the stomach turns," relating to sleeping guards at nuclear sites.
    I look with disdain upon supervisors who cite you for a "lack of maturity" for doing what they asked you to do when you should have known they really didn't want it done. Equally disgusting are those who preach you have to go along to get along. They too are slimy people, SecTrainer.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Bill Warnock View Post
    My looking around while on duty making my rounds...

    Enjoy the day,
    Bill
    Wait a minute, Bill. Let me get this straight. You're saying that you actually "looked around" while patrolling?? As in, opening your eyes, swiveling your head around, and all that sort of thing? Weren't you afraid that you might actually SEE something and have to file a report or DO something?

    It's a great idea, although it must have made more work for you.

    Leave a comment:


  • msofin
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    Valor Security also does General Growth properties.

    I've seen oddness from individual Allied Barton branches. One upscale Chicago client, the guard force was wearing 2 inch belts. Some had handcuffs, some did not. Some had flashlights, some did not. One person had everything but a gun on. Her supervisor had a pair of handcuffs sticking out of his belt, and that's it.
    Allied officers are required to be trained and certified in the use of baton, OC spray, and handcuffs before they may be carried at sites 'permitted' to carry these items. The only certifications the company will recognize is MEB (madanock Expandable Baton), OCAT (OC spray), and PATH (Pratical and Tatical handcuffing).

    This is interesting, Allied's badge is gold. I was recently in the Atlanta International Airport (traveling with Penn State Athletics), AlliedBarton has a few posts in there now. What surprised me was they wore all midnight navy blue uniforms with SILVER badges. Is there a law in Georgia that specifies what uniforms and badges security can wear?

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Valor Security also does General Growth properties.

    I've seen oddness from individual Allied Barton branches. One upscale Chicago client, the guard force was wearing 2 inch belts. Some had handcuffs, some did not. Some had flashlights, some did not. One person had everything but a gun on. Her supervisor had a pair of handcuffs sticking out of his belt, and that's it.

    Leave a comment:


  • HospitalPatrol
    replied
    I lived in the area when Providence Place opened.
    AlliedBarton is the security company there and I believe for all the General Growth Properties malls. I know AlliedBarton works at a mall down here in SC.
    I remember reading an article when Providence Place opened about a security guard getting arrested for interfering with a police officer when they were trying to break up a gang fight or whatever and the security guard wouldn't follow the cops orders or something.
    There have been numerous reports of violence and assaults in and around the mall.
    Also more recently I read that a security guard almost drove a patrol vehicle off the ledge of their parking garage on the night shift.
    From what I observed on my visits to the mall they had maybe five officers on at a time including vehicle rovers. They had one officer monitoring some cameras and sitting around in their little office. Officers also handled the parking operations like taking payments or whatever I think. I also saw that they had a bike patrol officer.
    I personally believe that there is no excuse for not catching on to something like this especially with a contract of such high importance. Yes it is a high traffic open access area but this is all the more reason to be on alert for suspicious activity.
    This example is a lighthearted type of thing but it is a serious security concern.
    Hopefully terrorists do not start stockpiling weapons and explosives in AlliedBarton protected facilities. We will be doomed.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPCap
    replied
    Did they have vehicles on the lot? I have seen some mall security note "overnight" violators each night. The first two nights were warnings and the third resulted in a tow. Also, the make, model and tag number were recorded for future reference. It's interesting that mall security "just" found out about it.
    Last edited by LPCap; 10-06-2007, 10:57 PM.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    I"d have found it. I look for stuff like that. But I"ve also been reprimanded for being in places they didn't think I belonged.
    Craig I used to find things other guard did not because they reasoned it might make waves. My looking around while on duty making my rounds helped me later in my career and I built upon those findings. What some of workers didn't like was the habit I had of doubling back to a clock station and then continuing my rounds hitting all the stations, some twice. If you really want to hear folks howl, cut the colored tape or cloth off of fencing outriggers. Since I was only working part time I saw lots of sites. Then I moved to take a different posting and then, fun was had by all. If you work full time as a security officer/guard, what have you, you could wind up persona non grata.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    I"d have found it. I look for stuff like that. But I"ve also been reprimanded for being in places they didn't think I belonged.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    Wouldn't building schematics, a watchful eye/ear & some surveillance have found this 'pad' sooner?
    I have never had access to accurate schematics of a facility I worked at. In most cases, asking would make you "odd" and get you transferred.

    its a simple case of, "That looks like it belongs." He was only found because a door was left ajar and someone investigated the ajar door. If he had been diligent in securing "his" front door, there would be a "super sweet" second bedroom eventually.

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  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by Badge714 View Post
    I saw the story on Fox News this morning. It took security 4 years to find his secret pad.
    Wouldn't building schematics, a watchful eye/ear & some surveillance have found this 'pad' sooner?

    Leave a comment:


  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    Reminds me of the car audio distributor I met with over their high internal theft of premium equipment. I did a perimeter check and pointed to a crate near a loading dock and was told that is where the drivers have a smoke and coffee when waiting for their trucks to be loaded or unloaded. My partner dropped his lighter in the grass and spotted a massive hole (3 feet across) hidden behind the crate that led into the "secured store-room" inside the complex for high risk items. It had PIR's and everything on the outside but nothing inside as it was considered heavily fortified. Their was a crate of merchandise inside that was pushed to block the hole as was on the outside. Ironic how their security manager could not find the problem but had a new car stereo system in all his cars ?

    Leave a comment:


  • Badge714
    replied
    Originally posted by Cactus View Post
    http://www.boston.com/news/local/rho...p1=MEWell_Pos1

    definitely a weird story, I wish I could have seen what it looked like. Pretty bad that the "apartment" lasted so long to.
    I saw the story on Fox News this morning. It took security 4 years to find his secret pad. The guy had parties there, and got away with it for 4 years? I'm glad they don't work for me!

    Leave a comment:

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