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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    The notebooks I mentioned are exactly the same as what our police carry - except they have fancy external covers the books slide into. Where I worked at our stadium we had incident cards - pocket size cards with printed information on it (ie. offence, witnesses, police involved, arrest, etc) which were designed to speed up processing of ejected patrons from the stadium. I recall 1 day we had some 40 patrons to be processed in the charge room with that many outside so minor offences were let go with ejections from the stadium.

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  • Mr. Chaple
    replied
    For legal notes Hank1's suggestions are right on the money, though I would also suggest that your note book be non-perforated and glue bound, so it can be proven that you have not ripped any pages out. Security Consultant's recommendation of a reporter's note book is also very sound. Personally, I am still shocked that there are guards who do not carry some kind of pocket notebook. However, unless you are prone to getting rained on or sweating profusely, a $0.35 memo pad will work just as well.
    In addition I favor blue books for incident/investigations notes. They are 3-8 page long, paper bound, notebooks with cataloging fields on the front cover. I like the fact that I can devote an entire notebook to each incident with out excessive waste, and they can be picked up for $0.10-$0.65 each. I have no idea what the proper term for them is, but they are designed for teacher's to issue during tests involving essay questions. I pick mine up at the local college bookstore, I do not know what other types of stores might sell them.
    Do you maintain a pass down log/notebook to leave information for other shifts?

    Edit: I know it goes with out saying but ... Never Use White-Out!
    Last edited by Mr. Chaple; 11-19-2007, 11:34 AM.

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  • NRM_Oz
    replied
    I was asked by a colleague to send him over some Aussie Security Notebooks and they worked out to be about $8.00 US each. These are a bound book, in a PVC cover, pocket size, numbered book with individual number pages 1 - 128 with a 1/4" ruled margin (NFI why they have these). I agree with the previous posts (details, etc) but will include the conversations of I SAID `Stop hitting me`, HE SAID `NO I am going to hurt you bad`. These are what incident reports and statements should be taken from and often a defense lawyer is going to say I want to see the notebooks please.

    When I have done conduct interviews I ask for copies of these documents as I want to see how factual the statement was after the completion of the incident report. Yes I have asked to refer to my notebook in a matter in court and because my statement was based word for word it was never queried and often my colleagues will ask me to check on details of an arrest to confirm the details. Us old school were taught by ex police who told you - there is only 1 way - OUR WAY which has been done for decades and has never failed anyone yet.

    For notes, etc - I cut business card size slips of paper and insert them behind the clear covers for telephone numbers or information for people plus my business cards too.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    I've posted this awhile back in a notebook thread but it's worth posting again. Here's a source for a notebook that is specifically designed for LE or security field notes, with pages already consecutively numbered and a "front page" for identifying ownership and serially numbering your notebooks.

    Here's the link: http://www.safecity.com.au/notebooks.htm

    Company is in Australia but you can order online as I've done (2 weeks delivery) and I presume that they might have US distributors. If not, I notice that "dealer enquiries are welcome" if any of you think you'd like to sell it.

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  • ozsecuritychic
    replied
    I love my note books and occurance books and have had to use them at court several times. The other guards have used my notes too.Most of the time its really small things that I write about that come in handy later on down the track. My notes were used to catch some people that broke into the bottle shop at work and I even had pics cut out of them from the paper , because I recognised them so kept the pics.
    Last edited by ozsecuritychic; 09-16-2007, 11:11 AM.

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  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    I used to carry a 'reporters' notebook. They are skinny enough to carry in a vest or pack pants pocket. You can still buy them at a office supply store.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    anyway...

    Finding out what happens to you in Texas if you record without explicit consent is a very good idea.
    Thanks, chief, got it covered...

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  • big_d
    replied
    Yes sorry should have been more specific. Yes you guys are right on the money. I just wanted a notebook to write duty notes for my own legal record.

    Thanks again

    Duncan

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  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    That's the way I took it too... just 'instant duty notes' than can be transferred to a shift report later, but also kept as a personal legal record of events/incidents
    Ok then, I wasn't the only one! LOL!

    Be safe,

    Hank

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  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by Hank1 View Post
    I may have read the original post incorrectly then. As I read it, I thought he was reffering to a notepad and not a DAR. I answered his question assuming that he was talking about his note pad.

    Be safe,

    Hank
    That's the way I took it too... just 'instant duty notes' than can be transferred to a shift report later, but also kept as a personal legal record of events/incidents

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  • CAPTAIN KOOLAID
    replied
    Note Books

    I keep 3 log books
    (1) field interview pad
    (1) log book
    (1) idea book

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I'm not sure what he actually asked for, but hell, I figured I'd give both.

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  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    I wrote a notebook thread a long time ago.

    Ok, first, are we talking about a notebook that you carry on you and use to write down notes so that you can do an official report later, or put details in a chronological log book?

    Or, are we talking about a chronological log book where you write all the activities that occurred down on your shift, and is a record that the company and client uses to know what happened?

    (That would be the "Daily Activity Record" as some call it.)

    While most DAR's are a single sheet, a chronological log book is maintained with no gaps, for as long as the shifts are running. Its the stereotypical log book we all have heard about.

    0001 Maj. M. Kusanagi #2501 off duty.
    0002 Ofc. D. Aramaki #0001 has physically relieved Maj. Kusanagi, and has assumed the security watch.
    0005 Began exterior and interior patrols. All quiet.
    0100 Began exterior and interior patrols. Still quiet.

    Whereas, a notebook... Well, that's just something to jog your memory. So long as you follow Sectrainer's advice on not putting anything that isn't work related into it (Do you really want your GF's phone number entered into public record?) and you put what you need to remember stuff in it, you can do it any way you want.

    For me, I always did it this way.

    Inside flap of notebook:

    I, Ofc. N. A. Corbier, have opened this notebook on 1 Jan 2007 at 2200 hours. There are 147 pages accounted for, numbered consecutively.

    /s/ Ofc. N. A. Corbier #2501

    For each entry:

    <Horizontal line>
    2 Jan 2007 | 1 Bob Dole Lane
    0014 Hrs | Signal 27
    Com: J. Doe WM 5'11" 180# BLN BLU NDS NFD
    Vic: A. Chimgez WF 5'4" 110# RED GRN NDS 04/01/1982
    Blown pupils noticed, bruise to left forearm, cut to left hand.
    PD: TPD Ofc. Smith #554 0016 0026 0110

    Some narrative if I need it
    <Horizontal line to clear entry out>
    I may have read the original post incorrectly then. As I read it, I thought he was reffering to a notepad and not a DAR. I answered his question assuming that he was talking about his note pad.

    Be safe,

    Hank

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    It isn't a matter of admissible in court. Its a matter of committing criminal violations of the law related to recording others.

    For example, Florida has an expectation of privacy when two people converse. Recording someone without their explicit consent is a felony.

    Finding out what happens to you in Texas if you record without explicit consent is a very good idea.

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  • Guest
    Guest replied
    recording

    As for recording audio conversations as someone suggested, notifying them that you're recording is either not necessary at all (one-party consent states) OR is not enough (two-party consent states). In a one-party state where you're one of the "parties" to a conversation, you don't have to say anything about recording the conversation.

    However, in a two-party state, you need their SPECIFIC CONSENT, not just announcing to the other party that you ARE recording. Courts are very touchy on this particular subject and most will not accept the theory that there is "implied consent" merely because one party gives notification of recording and the other party does not raise an objection.
    To an extent, I warn them of recording for legal cover. The main thing I have learned is that, when told they are being recorded, most subjects will calm down considerably. I have had irate drunks become a little more reasonable when they are being taped. They do not know if it is admissible in court or not, just that it is in my pocket.

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