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  • revised S.O.P/ S.O.G

    I was looking at a s o p manual and I could not help but laugh. the last time any revision was made was back in 1991. Knowing times have changed and somethings that are in the book do not cover todays operations.

    Suggestions on when or how long a sop/sog manual should be revised?
    Last edited by hemi444; 01-29-2006, 06:30 AM.

  • #2
    Originally posted by hemi444
    I was looking at a s o p manual and I could not help but laugh. the last time any revision was made was back in 1991. Knowing times have changed and somethings that are in the book do not cover todays operations.

    Suggestions on when or how long a sop/sog manual should be revised?
    I'd go with an informal evaluation every 3 to 6 months, and a formal evaluation with corporate counsel, insurance agent, supervisors, and at least one regular employee every year.

    If you know something just changed in law or tort, then its time to grab the SOP manual. Another good time to immediately review it is when a new hire, reading it the first time, points out anything that sounds weird to them - after taking a genuine effort to find out why it sounds weird to that new hire.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      In my unfortunate experience, SOP manuals are only written by security companies to show they have some sort of "training" for their staff. They are rarely adhered to and nearly never updated at most places I have ever seen. They are most commonly written as "post orders" and placed in a notebook, never to be updated again. The problem with that, other than being useless to begin with is, what if you're sued for acting on the SOP manual? What if you're sued for violating the SOP manual? If you have one, it really needs to be updated with every practical change in environment, law, and political climate.
      "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

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      • #4
        I work for a company that is in essence WBS, but on a contract that is just a little more stringent than the rest of the company's stuff (armed federal contract).

        We have the ubiquitous 'post orders' at all locations, which also contain the SOPs. The difference is we must read them every shift. We are challenged on them every few days by the company QA inspector or an FPO (federal police officer), with bogus material sometimes being inserted to catch those who do not read. There are also ever-changing 'special orders' that are inserted and updated constantly. One thing that really gets me is the fact that any of the above folks can modify the orders in writing at any time, or even verbally, which the officer must then log and pass on, until such time as the modifying person provides the new orders in writing.

        Makes things a lot easier to just read them before and after each shift (but more boring).
        Last edited by OccamsRazor; 01-29-2006, 04:36 PM. Reason: To clarify...

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        • #5
          Originally posted by wilrobnson
          I work for a company that is in essence WBS, but on a contract that is just a little more stringent than the rest of the company's stuff (armed federal contract).

          We have the ubiquitous 'post orders' at all locations, which also contain the SOPs. The difference is we must read them every shift. We are challenged on them every few days by the company QA inspector or an FPO (federal police officer), with bogus material sometimes being inserted to catch those who do not read....
          COOL! I wish they did that here. Even a monthly quiz would help to keep us "on our toes."
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 1stWatch
            In my unfortunate experience, SOP manuals are only written by security companies to show they have some sort of "training" for their staff. They are rarely adhered to and nearly never updated at most places I have ever seen.......
            That's what has happened where I work. The latest revision was obsolete before it even went to press.
            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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            • #7

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                Have written detailed general orders been issued? Coordinated with general counsel? Who signed them? When writing orders and/or instructions, remember: They tell the story of how, when Napoleon was an artillery lieutenant, he found this private. Though the man was retarded, Napoleon keeps promoting him and kept him on his staff. Finally, in desperation, Marshal Ney asked, "Why?? Napoleon?s answer was classic, to be practiced by all of us, "Because, when I write an order, I let him read it first. If he understands it, everyone else will too!"
                Enjoy the day,
                Bill
                At one of the post I had alot of problem children not wanting to follow the s.o.p manual. So I took it home rewrote in a longer version so that my daughter that was 7 could even read and understand along with thepictures to show how certain things where to be done. After Sitting everyone down with a powerpoint presentation I started to filter out the unwanted children.

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                • #9
                  Hemi444, excellent example! Many who write SOPs and security manuals and plans try to show their prowess with English. That is fine for those who have such an expanse, but for others it is an uphill battle.
                  I was an Air Force instructor in Communications Center Operations, teletype.
                  The military had at that time six designations to determine the order in which messages were to be sent. A two letter designation was assigned to each. The highest designation was "Flash - - ZZ;" "Emergency - - YY;" "Operational Immediate - - OO;" "Priority - - PP;" "Routine - - RR;" and "Deferred - - MM."
                  A lot of the students, in service for about nine weeks, had some difficulty. I used a vulgar phrase to indicate the fastest, "It goes like a mother**." It worked in that era where there were few if any women were in class.
                  When asked why my students correctly answered the question, the answer was simple, "Teach at the level of their understanding."
                  Write and speak at a level where the least educated and/or experienced will comprehend.
                  Enjoy the day,
                  Bill

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Bill Warnock
                    Hemi444, excellent example! Many who write SOPs and security manuals and plans try to show their prowess with English. Enjoy the day,
                    Bill
                    Thank you Bill, I really tried to figure out what I could do but that was the only Idea that I had at the time at suprising myself, it worked for the better.

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