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  • Thinking of working as a SO

    Hi, I'm 21 years old and recently I have thought about getting the D license and get a job. I see this type of work as something good becuase first I look at my newspaper and see several jobs needing Security people. That itself tells me security guards are wanted. Second my dad has said to me in his previous job that he gets overworked at a low paying job so seeing a security job i get paid and dont get overworked. I see that as something like obvious and good idea. Jobs I had before the boss/supervisor would be on my back and I would have to do so much work that it wasn't worth it for the money I was earning. Also this job is more preferable to me then as a job in retail/food businesses. I have told my parents about this work and both disagree I should do it(mom thinks im going to get shot). So since many people here work in this whats your pros/cons and any suggestions, opinions i appreciate.

  • #2
    LOL...

    My mom said the same thing to me years ago when I first started working in the security field... She recently said it again when I told her I had applied with the Sheriff's Office... That's just her 'mommy' side showing..

    For me, security has always been better than the retail/food industry, even when I worked the crappy sites in years past... But keep in mind that if you're just starting out, you'll probably be put at one of those crappy sites... Starting pay is usually close to the same as retail/food, and doesn't get much better until you have a lot more experience and find a good company to work for...

    There's a lot of good out there in the security world, and a lot of bad as well. It CAN be a fun, fulfilling job... But always remember, (as with ANY job), it's only as good as you make it.
    Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
    Shoulda called in sick.
    Be safe!

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    • #3
      Just remember, you'll need the initial investment for the D school + D application fees. If you can find a firm that takes this out of your check periodically, or pays for it outright, then that's one option.

      Otherwise, its about 200-250 to get into the business in Florida.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        I would highly recommend entering the security business. It has been a highly rewarding career for me.

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        • #5
          Charger what do you mean crappy sites? guard places in what type of location? Corbier I checked here how much and just need a license unless theres hidden fees???

          Yes and also I forgot to mention I'd like this job as it would probably help my resume/experience when I apply for Brinks guarding company.

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          • #6
            You must go to a Class D school to get your license. You are required to have a 24 hours of training prior to license issuance, then an additional course within 180 days of license issuance.

            Those schools cost anywhere from 50-100 dollars. This is on top of your Class D license fee paid to the state.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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            • #7
              weathers...

              I have worked the 'crappy sites' and they are all dependent on the person. Some of our officers do not like the isolation of a construction site, but I do. Others prefer to work in loud clubs all the time, I would rather not. If I was put in that situation, I would think it was kind of crappy. Also, some locations are just magnets for trouble, so you have to keep an eye out for that. Crappy is all in the eyes of the beholder though...Good Luck

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              • #8
                All professions have pluses and minuses. However, I chose this career 10 years ago and I have never looked back. I have done a lot of things as a Protection Officer that I am proud of. It takes constant training and education. In any profession, learning is a constant. Good luck to you.

                Be safe,

                Hank
                " We are determined that before the sun sets on this terrible struggle, our flag will be recognized throughout the world as a symbol of freedom on one hand and of overwhelming force on the other" - General George C. Marshall

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                • #9
                  Bigdog, show the man the statue that PIRAC had passed this year.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Security Mike
                    I live in Florida and have my class d license. I was hired by Allied Barton in 2004 and they sent me to a school they send there people to and they took the money out of my first 2 checks..I think it was $50 for the class and $75 for the state fees.

                    You need at least 24 hours of training before they give you a license to start work. Some classes have 2 days of training 7am-7pm and the other option is 3 days of classes 8 hours a day.

                    Corbier is actually incorrect in the time allowed to recieve the additional 16 hours of training. Its not 180 days its actually 2 years from the date of your initial 24 hour classes.

                    Thats what I did. I went 3 days to get my 24 hours in and then went about 22 months later to a different school to get the additional 16 hours.

                    So just to be clear its 40 hours in total you will need.

                    24 hours initially to get a license and begin work and then 2 years to get the additional 16 hours and then your done!

                    I think you just have to renew your license every 2 years but no more classes.

                    Just to be clear you have to pass a written exam to get the license. Its not like you just sit there for 24 hours and they say "here ya go" You sit there for 3 days and listen to the instructor and also watch NUMEROUS videos and then on the 3rd day in the final hour you take the test. I think you need to have 75% of the test correct to pass.

                    The classes are veeeeeeeeeeery boring!

                    Some companies also have you go thru there own private training and orientation which can be another 2-3 days of sitting and listening and possibly another test!

                    BUT....On the bright side once you have the license in the state you choose you can use it anywhere in that state which is cool.

                    I enjoy security I just wish it payed more
                    Bigdog will post the statute, I don't feel like looking for it, but it has changed. As of I believe 1 Jan this year you are required to get the remaining 16 hours completed within 180 days or your license is null and void and you get to take it all over again. This is why my company does the whole 40 at one time.

                    Also, I have heard birds whistling that the state (I'm assuming that means PIRSAC) is considering mandatory continuing education for every renewel. I guess right now they are debating what would constitute that cdu, whether or not it has to be taught by a DI.
                    SecurityProfessional is Back up and running!

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                    • #11
                      I just took 24hr D Class in FL and you have 6 months or 180 days to take the remaining 16 hour class. I thought the first 24 hrs was interesting since it shows what you are liable for. Every last person in class seemed to be genuinely interested as well, even if it just glosses over huge subject matter.

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                      • #12
                        You don't think a Security Officer should have continuing education? How else would some officers find out about changes to the law as it effects security. How many FL officers don't know the new lightbar law. I mean heck look at how many don't know that the license requirement changed. What happens when the new detention law gets passed? Half the people won't even know about it.

                        Training is survival, period.

                        I know some people do training on their own time, and even a select few companies give their officers continuing education. But what about the officer whose company refuses to giving him any and can't afford it on his own?
                        SecurityProfessional is Back up and running!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by gcmc security part 2 View Post
                          You don't think a Security Officer should have continuing education? How else would some officers find out about changes to the law as it effects security. How many FL officers don't know the new lightbar law. I mean heck look at how many don't know that the license requirement changed. What happens when the new detention law gets passed? Half the people won't even know about it.

                          Training is survival, period.

                          I know some people do training on their own time, and even a select few companies give their officers continuing education. But what about the officer whose company refuses to giving him any and can't afford it on his own?
                          It seems like SO training is where the money is at, especially if they add continued training. Once you get your license and renew it, all you need to know is 'observe and report' for the most part. Otherwise, you are just a vendor working for an employer with multiple bosses: as a team for bigger accounts or by yourself in some cases.

                          It seems like many people here are combat ready to fight street people at a moments notice; while someone recently got into trouble patting one down. I'd rather baby sit the rich anyday in glorious humility. Whatever one feels more comfortable with and can justify on their personal cost/benefit appraisals. But there will always be crime, rich people, and scare tactics; so there will always be a market for a wide range of SO's per each customer's specific desires.

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                          • #14
                            The only problem I have with continuing education is that unlike law enforcement you don't get much incentive. LEOs go to these classes not only to improve their needs but they get merit, step or certification raises. In Florida and most states you walk into the security company they really don't care about what you have. As long as it meets the requirements by state law and theirs to put you in a uniform. What ever you attain with them is maybe, maybe a benefit to you but not much else. Unless your young and just starting in the field it may help in the long run trying to get on with a higher standard operation. I honestly don't think terrorist, hostage or related extra training is relevant in the world of observing and reporting. Until standards are changed dramatically in security work IMHO continuing education puts money in the DOL pockets.
                            My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

                            -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

                            -It's just a job kid deal with it

                            -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Echos13 View Post
                              The only problem I have with continuing education is that unlike law enforcement you don't get much incentive. LEOs go to these classes not only to improve their needs but they get merit, step or certification raises. In Florida and most states you walk into the security company they really don't care about what you have. As long as it meets the requirements by state law and theirs to put you in a uniform. What ever you attain with them is maybe, maybe a benefit to you but not much else. Unless your young and just starting in the field it may help in the long run trying to get on with a higher standard operation. I honestly don't think terrorist, hostage or related extra training is relevant in the world of observing and reporting. Until standards are changed dramatically in security work IMHO continuing education puts money in the DOL pockets.
                              Continuing education is always a good thing. Nothing worse than someone who already knows everything!

                              Unfortunately, with low ball observe and report security companies always willing to bid just a little bit lower than everyone else, they keep the industry in the toilet, pay poor wages and try and make a small amount of money per hour and make it up by volume.

                              Its up to the security industry to repair its broken image. Higher standards for security officers would be a good start to improving the image. It would also force wages up just like it did for the police industry when they raised standards.

                              It will probably take laws requiring higher standards before this happens. The big security companies won't get behind this idea voluntarily.
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