Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Observe WHAT?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Observe WHAT?

    Okay. So your job is to "observe and report". Just what does that mean to you? Observe how? Observe what?

    "Observation" can mean a lot of different things and can involve different methods, ranging from very passive to very active. You won't observe lots of things unless you are actively and deliberately LOOKING for them. Lots of us only "observe" the things that happen to cross our field of vision...or things we just stumble across.

    Take a parking garage, for instance, where your job is to patrol, observe and report. Just what are you looking for, and how? Are you just wandering around on patrol, bored as hell, or do you have an active plan for a thorough inspection of the facility?

    1. Do you look at license plates? Notice anything unusual about them, or the way they're affixed to the vehicle, etc? Would you notice a clean license plate on a filthy car, or vice versa?

    2. What about parking stickers other than your own? Even bumper stickers can tell you something sometimes.

    3. What about the visible contents of vehicles?

    4. Unusual conditions of vehicles that might indicate the vehicle has been stolen (broken windows, punched-out trunk locks, etc.)? Unusual fluids leaking? Unusual odors? Noises?

    5. Do you have access to police BOLOs for stolen or other vehicles of interest? Why not?

    6. Do you sight under vehicles for the feet of someone hiding from you?

    7. What about safety conditions in the garage? Oil spills? Damaged barriers?

    8. Garage lighting all functional? How about those distress call boxes?

    9. Are there stairwells? Who's hiding in them?

    10. Any objects left lying around anywhere? Did you inspect the trash receptacles?

    11. Very likely, SOMETHING has changed in the time since your last patrol? So, what's different?

    The field of security is no longer merely a "labor" industry; it is now a knowledge industry. That means:

    1. Knowledge about security threats to your facility.

    2. Knowledge about security vulnerabilities and the history of incidents in and around your facility.

    3. Knowledge about security countermeasures, methods and technologies.

    4. Knowledge about the current "normal" state of the environment in and around the facility, and changes in this environment over time. What's happening today that isn't "normal"?

    5. Knowledge about emergency services of all kinds, how they are accessed, what their expected response times are, etc.

    ...and lots more, all pertaining to the officer who believes that his job is "just" to "observe and report".

    We often complain that security clients only want "warm bodies", and so that's all we give them. It's up to us to prove them wrong, and nothing does that like reports flowing in from proactive, knowledgeable, savvy officers that tell the client something that he didn't know and wouldn't know if it were not for such reports.

    If we want the client to understand the difference between a "warm body" and a professional security officer, we must be living models of that difference until the client finally "gets it". And, you'll enjoy your job much more in the bargain.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 08-28-2007, 12:47 PM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

  • #2
    Well after a while, noticing those things and informing the client, and month after month they do nothing, except give you the impression they'd rather you didnt bother them, its tough to do that kind of a job.

    If the patrons and the doctors weren't appreciative (they are) it'd be tough to come to work.

    Comment


    • #3
      Well after a while, noticing those things and informing the client, and month after month they do nothing, except give you the impression they'd rather you didnt bother them, its tough to do that kind of a job.
      Also, alot of businesses don't want to spend the money. If they can find a shortcut, they will take it everytime. However, the things mentioned by SecTrainer, could be a great way to CYA. When the SHTF, you normally always hear "well, where was security". I'd suggest doing such checks on a monthly basis, atleast if the SHTF you've CYA.
      "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

      Comment


      • #4
        Holy smokes this thread is great. Definite food for thought. I've asked a few of those questions before. The client is usually a deer in headlights, and the boss usually says "don't worry about it nothing ever happens out there."

        Trust me, as cheap as most these clients are, they wouldn't have warm bodies out there if nothing ever happened. So I usually end up the rabble rouser for asking too many questions about a post.
        sigpicMy ideal security vehicle and uniforms:

        Comment


        • #5
          I can very well side with what you have to say there, Ron. I have actually been removed from posts for "stirring the pot, rocking the boat", etc. If all a client wants is a warm body, well hell, my company has an abundance of those. If they get someone who is vocal and proactive, constantly tossing out fresh ideas, well they don't wanna hear all that noise."What's that? We have millions of dollars of alloys and copper along a fenceline with little or no lighting and you don't feel safe? Hogwash! It's a bad neighborhood? Bah! Your white shirts stick out like a sore thumb at night? Tough $h!t!" Well, at least that's the going attitude around here. That's why I'm sooo glad that tonight's my last night. Effective 0600hrs, I won't be employed by this company any longer. It's better for my safety and peace of mind, as well as my wife's.
          I do security for work; I run into burning buildings for fun

          Comment


          • #6
            hope you have something better to get into. These days, if you're not some kind of mechanic, you're a food service or retail drone. Or security. All jobs garaunteed never to be outsourced.

            With me- I think what keeps me going in security besides the steady work is the responsibility. I don't mean I get off on wearing a gun. I get off on the responsibility entrusted to me to wear the damn cannon on my side to begin with.

            Trust me, in this biz your perks are what you make of them.
            sigpicMy ideal security vehicle and uniforms:

            Comment


            • #7
              I'm thinking the new job will be better...Hell, I'm getting a 10k a year raise, company vehicle, expenses paid when I'm outta town, full benefits, profit sharing, the works. No more piddly-ass $9 an hour jobs/posts with no benefits and no way to protect myself!
              I do security for work; I run into burning buildings for fun

              Comment


              • #8
                SAY! whatcha getting into anyway? if I may ask
                sigpicMy ideal security vehicle and uniforms:

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Blade Runner View Post
                  I can very well side with what you have to say there, Ron. I have actually been removed from posts for "stirring the pot, rocking the boat", etc. If all a client wants is a warm body, well hell, my company has an abundance of those.
                  Sadly clients can be major penny pinchers, I'd just keep filling out those shift reports mentioning anything unsafe (along with regular security related issues) until I got moved (or it got fixed), because if the proverbial ever hit the fan it'd be 'yours truly' being fed to the wolves, with the client claiming ignorance to the safety issue...

                  I guess BadBoynMD's acronym never rang truer CYA!
                  "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    And if anything major happens, make a copy of the DAR and SIR for that shift, in case it miraculously vanishes. I've heard of clients rummaging through post books before.
                    sigpicMy ideal security vehicle and uniforms:

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Ron Jessee View Post
                      SAY! whatcha getting into anyway? if I may ask
                      I'll be working for a beverage company installing and servicing soda fountains in restaurants, driving all over Texas and maybe into Louisiana.
                      I do security for work; I run into burning buildings for fun

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Ron Jessee View Post
                        And if anything major happens, make a copy of the DAR and SIR for that shift, in case it miraculously vanishes. I've heard of clients rummaging through post books before.
                        I've told rookies, that you should keep a 3-ring binder. Make copies of EVERYTHING you do, from use of force reports, to reimbursement forms. Most companies, will "change" your report around for whatever "they" think it should say. When you testify in court, don't answer unless you have "your" report to review.
                        "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                        Comment

                        Leaderboard

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X