Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Security Tackles And Chokes Suject

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    If you screw up on an LVNR, you can crush the windpipe and cause death. The idea behind the LVNR is that you apply pressure to the sides of the neck, cutting off the blood supply.

    A proper LVNR will cut off blood supply, not air supply. Of course, applying one properly takes skill and practice, and it could be deadly if not applied correctly.

    I thought he pulled it off flawlessly... Very smooth, and as soon as the subject went limp, he released.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    Originally Posted by Maelstrom
    Oddly enough (in this State) the 'bladed stance' is considered aggressive posturing and an elevation of the SO's Force Continuum, with the increase of CCTV, litigation & aggressive encounters for SO's, recent training now emphasises a 'squared on' approach as it looks less aggressive
    Originally posted by Andy Taylor View Post
    You have got to be kidding. I for one will not be doing any security work in your state.
    It'd be one heck of a commute

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by HospitalOfficer View Post
    Saw this video and thought of everyone. I don't know about choking someone though.

    http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=397_1187905672
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8pklq_ShnbA

    Leave a comment:


  • Andy Taylor
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    Oddly enough (in this State) the 'bladed stance' is considered aggressive posturing and an elevation of the SO's Force Continuum, with the increase of CCTV, litigation & aggressive encounters for SO's, recent training now emphasises a 'squared on' approach as it looks less aggressive

    You have got to be kidding. I for one will not be doing any security work in your state.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Ron Jessee View Post
    I find that squaring off 90 degrees with your side arm opposite to the subject and your hands on your duty belt to be the safest and yet project an air of respectability. Just as long as you dont rest your hand on your gun, obviously

    I disagree. If you're facing a suspect in a squared-off stance, you are not balanced and will need to adjust your feet if you need to fight. In addition, your hands at your waist and on your duty belt are doing nothing to protect your chest and face if you suddenly need to react.

    Reaction time, people. Reaction time. The less time it takes to react to something, the better chance you have of winning. Why deliberately place obstacles in our way that slow our reaction time? You know that if you need to fight, you'll need to be in a bladed stance with your hands up. Why would you not already be in that stance if you're making contact with a suspect? You don't stand there with your fists clenched in a boxer's guard, but with your hands clasped together at chest level in a professional manner. You can also take notes with a notebook and pen from this position, still being able to look up and see your surroundings without even moving your head.

    Leave a comment:


  • SRT S-1
    replied
    I Would Have Say That S/o # 2 Should Have Never Left His Partner Like That If He Had Been Right There I Think Their Would Have Been No Reson To Use The Choke Hold Or The Lvnr. 2 Officers Should Be Adaquit Use Of Force If You Ask Me.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    If someone wants to be an idiot and fight me, then they better pack a lunch, because I'm going to be here for a while. But I don't want to invite them into it, either, because you can only fight so many people every day before it starts to get a little old. Not to mention the paperwork involved...
    ...I feel you there... my feeling is the same way. Specially sense, I hate paperwork. I've only gotten into only a few altercations, as i've been blessed to talk my way out of situations. Then again, my size is a bit intimidating.

    Leave a comment:


  • Ron Jessee
    replied
    I find that squaring off 90 degrees with your side arm opposite to the subject and your hands on your duty belt to be the safest and yet project an air of respectability. Just as long as you dont rest your hand on your gun, obviously

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    Well, my take on it is that if it's a knucklehead, they can think what they want. If they want to be dumb, then most times there gonna "try" you.
    If someone wants to be an idiot and fight me, then they better pack a lunch, because I'm going to be here for a while. But I don't want to invite them into it, either, because you can only fight so many people every day before it starts to get a little old. Not to mention the paperwork involved...

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    As long as your hands aren't in your pockets...

    I think the bigger reason I dislike standing with arms crossed is because of the unprofessional body language appearance it gives. While speaking with victims, it may create the perception that you're disinterested or guarded, and while speaking with suspects, it causes you to look unprepared and relaxed. I generally find a hands-in-front posture to be the best all-around.
    Well, my take on it is that if it's a knucklehead, they can think what they want. If they want to be dumb, then most times there gonna "try" you. Dealing with a victim, you're facial expressions will set the tone. Usually when, I am dealing with a victim defense mode is slightly off. Chance favors the prepared mind. Plus, usually when you're speaking with a victim, you're taking notes, atleast we hope so.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by BadBoynMD View Post
    Actually, it's still pretty effective. Basically you're pushing your arms straight forward, therefore you're reaction time is still pretty quick. In my last defensive tacs class, we did this several times. As long as your hands remain in front of you, you're reaction times should be pretty quick.
    As long as your hands aren't in your pockets...

    I think the bigger reason I dislike standing with arms crossed is because of the unprofessional body language appearance it gives. While speaking with victims, it may create the perception that you're disinterested or guarded, and while speaking with suspects, it causes you to look unprepared and relaxed. I generally find a hands-in-front posture to be the best all-around.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by LPguy
    ...Ridiculous.

    I'm speechless, really.
    It's a little silly that we have to be concerned with 'how we look' when we perform our duties, as opposed to using the best defensive tactic dictated by the situation

    While standing 'full on' could be considered creating a soft/easy target, our defensive tactics instruction nicely complimented the lesser aggressive stance with deflection techniques
    Last edited by Maelstrom; 08-27-2007, 12:50 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    I wouldn't recommend standing with arms crossed, but instead, with your hands pressed or clasped together at chest level. If your arms are crossed, you need to unfold them, and that slows down your reaction time.
    Actually, it's still pretty effective. Basically you're pushing your arms straight forward, therefore you're reaction time is still pretty quick. In my last defensive tacs class, we did this several times. As long as your hands remain in front of you, you're reaction times should be pretty quick.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    Oddly enough (in this State) the 'bladed stance' is considered aggressive posturing and an elevation of the SO's Force Continuum, with the increase of CCTV, litigation & aggressive encounters for SO's, recent training now emphasises a 'squared on' approach as it looks less aggressive

    ...Ridiculous.

    I'm speechless, really.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
    Nice application of the LVNR by the security officer. However, I really hope no one here stands with their hands in their pockets and at their sides when making contact with a suspect. That's terrible officer presence and an officer safety issue. Your stance should be bladed and your hands should always be up in front of your chest and ready to fight if need be.
    Oddly enough (in this State) the 'bladed stance' is considered aggressive posturing and an elevation of the SO's Force Continuum, with the increase of CCTV, litigation & aggressive encounters for SO's, recent training now emphasises a 'squared on' approach as it looks less aggressive
    Last edited by Maelstrom; 08-26-2007, 11:48 PM.

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X