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Andy Griffith demeanor or J. Bourne?

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  • izeneers
    replied
    "Snitch"...

    Originally posted by locknid View Post
    If the people I arrest or "snitch on" as you put it are mad then they can try something right when I tell them that besides getting arrested they are getting evicted, possibly their parents, wife, etc also.

    I know it can happen at any time but knock on wood I have been lucky so far. For the most part though residents know how we operate and know they messed up if they are having issues with us.
    ...a street adverb (any English majors out there? Help!) which can save lives. You're wearin' the title proud and proper, Locknid...it's all good.
    Last edited by izeneers; 09-02-2007, 08:41 PM.

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  • locknid
    replied
    Originally posted by izeneers View Post
    ...Locknid. Of course I don't know everything about your situation, but you are likely stomping on some sore toes. You're the "snitch", voted "Most Popular Guy" in the underworld. I hope you've got your game plan firmly in place in case someone wants to throw a pahdee for 'ya.
    If the people I arrest or "snitch on" as you put it are mad then they can try something right when I tell them that besides getting arrested they are getting evicted, possibly their parents, wife, etc also.

    I know it can happen at any time but knock on wood I have been lucky so far. For the most part though residents know how we operate and know they messed up if they are having issues with us.

    Leave a comment:


  • NvJuggalo
    replied
    In my experience I have seen that you can be friendly and "get to know" people in a professional manner where they WORK, so if you're doing the big corporate building or small office complex, its good to build a repore with the employees, just keep it professional.

    on the other hand if you're doing apartments, say hi, be ultra nice, but be sure to come to an understanding with them, "im security and I have rules I must enforce."

    People tend to be a lot nicer when they are at work, even on bad days. But if you're dealing with someone where they live its a lot more difficult, because to them you are invading their space.

    Leave a comment:


  • izeneers
    replied
    Chucky on Target!!!

    Originally posted by Chucky View Post
    The truth of it is I have only one post order and it does not include them. But a free cup of coffee is always welcome and why let little facts ruin their lives.
    Chucky, honesty is such a virtue. Thank you so much for your brutally frank portrayal of it.
    It really distresses me at times, the arrogant ignorance (ignorant arrogance? Both?) of people. I'm afraid US vulnerabilities may lie much, much deeper than the obvious, i.e. porous borders. We have all been conditioned for many years to believe that somehow, somewhere, there is someone out there to protect us. Everyone, the client and onsite security as well, are responsible for security, to some degree.
    Just keep the Starbucks a'comin.
    Last edited by izeneers; 08-23-2007, 05:47 PM.

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  • Chucky
    replied
    The credo that I go by having been around the block a few times is old and most of you have likely heard it before.

    " Please do not mistake my kindness as a weakness."

    I like to know most the people that I encounter each day. It makes the job of weeding out the possible threats a little easier. Plus if I need help I feel that people will be more apt to jump in for someone they know and like.

    Another good point was that some people look down on the lowley guard as a piece of furniture. But right after the V Tech shooting people that would not even smile at me would come over and ask what I thought of it. All of a sudden the guy with the gun and badge that stands in the corner all day became a source of if I know him then I will feel safer in my little world. And if something like that happens here then he will protect me before others cause I'm his friend.

    The truth of it is I have only one post order and it does not include them. But a free cup of coffee is always welcome and why let little facts ruin their lives.

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  • izeneers
    replied
    Careful...

    ...Locknid. Of course I don't know everything about your situation, but you are likely stomping on some sore toes. You're the "snitch", voted "Most Popular Guy" in the underworld. I hope you've got your game plan firmly in place in case someone wants to throw a pahdee for 'ya.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    The saying "Don't (expletive) where you eat" comes to mind here.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    When I am on duty, I say hello, good evening and I even smile from time to time! I don't borrow cars, ask for favors and take anything for free. This way, I can never be comprimised.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • izeneers
    replied
    Originally posted by Security Mike
    rather then being looked upon as a "warm body" or stack of meat who opens the gate for rich snobs and get treated sub human in the process.
    I'm sure we've all been made to feel like that at times, Mikey. I prefer to use the "Shrek" analogy myself. "They judge me before they even know me." However, you might never know what dufus worked your self-same post before you came along, and, well, you just happen to be wearing the same uniform. I have been lucky enough at times to dodge the arrows and pitchforks slung at "that green, ugly ogre in the security blazer!" long enough to get the scoop about the loser who had resided before me. Then, I understood. Then again, some people are just plain old mean to all officers, it seems. Maybe abusing others is their pathetic source of a feeling of self-worth.

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  • locknid
    replied
    I have actually had the friend routine work a few times on residents which management wants evicted or I know are up to something. It takes awhile and can possible not work but it has worked everytime for me so far. I get them to feel very comfortable with me without sharing any info about me, or saying anything which can possibly get me in trouble. Eventually they will start sharing info with you which they probably shouldn't. Other times they will even tell me when they have drugs and offer them to me, at that time they get arrested or just a report to management if the amount is small. Once that happens I hook them or make a nice report if the amount is small. Also being friendly to certain residents will often create informants which can give valuable information about problem residentsMost properties are crime-free that i work so in the lease is a special section which states that residents can be immediatly evicted for any criminal activity or criminal activity by guests, even if they are unaware of it.

    but like I and others said be professional and for the most part don't converse too much in a friendly manner. You don't want to come across as intimidating to the wrong people though. The good people want to know you are there for them and helpful.

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  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by Security Mike
    Basically to sum it up..I just adapt to the enviorment. If a client and there employees are warm and nice to you , then its only natural that you return that warmth. If there cold , firm , and uptight then you should also return that.
    I'd have to disagree on that point... when confronted by rudeness & arrogance, it pays to remain polite & matter-of-fact because after all you're maintaining your professionalism even if they're not

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  • CAPTAIN KOOLAID
    replied
    niether

    i'm more of a Joe Friday friendly but just facts ma'am.
    You have be latter of both friendly but not friendly.
    Reason why, when you bust someone or give them warning. They going be like come on dude, we are friends aren't we. You let them slide then next thing you know there trying steal or want favors.
    If you are cold uncaring to people, they going call your supervisor and requsted you be replaced.


    They best way to be is a professional.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    Thats one of the reasons I went into this field. I don't have the "need" to socialize at work. If people want to chat thats fine (as long as it doesn't interfere with your job natuarally) and if they don't thats fine too.

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  • izeneers
    replied
    exactly my point, Mael...

    ...being in control of one's demeanor on a guard post is greatly enhanced by having a healthy, connected life outside of work. Too much OT can break up one's personal life...there's gotta be a balance.
    We are kindred spirits as far as the desire to work alone...especially in this biz...

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    I try and be friendly. Being friends isn't a problem as most of the staff won't lower themselves to chat with a lowly guard. I much prefer to chat with the contractors who come in, they tend to be very friendly.
    Ain't it funny how that 'attitude' changes when the proverbial hits the fan?

    I like to think I'm polite but never familiar with clients/employees, as for potentially feeling isolated at work... I go to work to do just that but socialize in my down time, besides I prefer working by myself it fits my personality type better

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