Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Security Police

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Security Police

    Okay so I know some states like missouri consider security officers law enforcement officers, with the title of security police they have full LEO powers, but work for private security companies. im just curious if any other states are like missouri..
    Its not how we die that counts.....
    Its not how we lived that counts....
    all that matters is how we saved that one life that one time by being in the right place at the right time....

  • #2
    In SC Security Officers have the full arrest authority of a Deputy Sheriff by statute but they don't call them security police or anything.

    Michigan has Act 330 Security Police Officers. They have misdemeanor arrest authority while on duty, in uniform and on their employers property. Last I checked their were only 9 agencies with this designation most of them being hospitals.

    That's it off the top of my head.
    SecurityProfessional is Back up and running!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by UtahProtectionForce View Post
      Okay so I know some states like missouri consider security officers law enforcement officers, with the title of security police they have full LEO powers, but work for private security companies. im just curious if any other states are like missouri..
      Missouri does not consider all security officers to be special police officers. It appears that the city of Kansas City, Missouri has a special license that grants special police officer status to certain security officers, however.

      There are many security officers in Washington, D.C. that also work as special police officers.

      Comment


      • #4
        I beg to differ... my husband is from missouri and he had worked for a company out there in springfield missouri and they were considered security police, according to him.
        Its not how we die that counts.....
        Its not how we lived that counts....
        all that matters is how we saved that one life that one time by being in the right place at the right time....

        Comment


        • #5
          Ahem. I looked this crap up.

          The STate of Missouri makes no law towards security guards.

          The City of St. Louis appoints special security officers, with limited police powers. They are not "Security Police," but do have police powers.

          The City of Kansas City, Kansas, appoints special security officers with limited police powers. They are not "police officers," but have police powers which are limited in scope.

          Other cities have similarly appointed citizens with special and extraordinary police powers.

          Witcha, for example, has Merchant Police, but these merchant police are not law enforcement officers under state or local law. They operate red/blue light via Witicha city permit.

          Michigan has Act 330 Security Police Officers, who are usually called "Act 330 Arrest Powers Security Guards," since "no one would call a guard a cop."

          SC makes it a criminal offense for a security company or person to refer to themselves by terms other than "protection" or "security." Police is very much illegal, and the security uniforms and vehicles must say SECURITY or PROTECTION. No other firm may have those words, btw, unless a guard firm.

          North Carolina has Company Police which aren't security at all, but private law enforcement agencies.

          Lets see, where else...

          I believe Springfield, Illinois has special Merchant Districts with Merchant Police. San Fransisco Special Patrol Officers are merchant police, but recently SFPD has noted that they may wear SFPD patches, they are not police officers and have "no arrest authority." In other words, they're BSIS security guards with the word police on their patch.

          Quite a few states do not regulate the term "police." Wisconsin is one, and while they hold no public authority (they're not cops), many companies use the term police, with private before and without.

          A shelf company I looked at buying once was Wisconsin Community Police. That's the entire company name. State said the name is fine.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by UtahProtectionForce View Post
            I beg to differ... my husband is from missouri and he had worked for a company out there in springfield missouri and they were considered security police, according to him.
            Read it again. The operative word I used was all, as in Missouri does not consider all security officers to be special police officers, nor are all security officers in Missouri granted some sort of police powers.

            I listed one such exception to the rule that I knew of, and I'm sure there may be more.

            Comment


            • #7
              ah okay it was a simple misunderstanding, according to my husband he worked for a company called springfield security police which was or is a DBA of midwest security out there....
              Its not how we die that counts.....
              Its not how we lived that counts....
              all that matters is how we saved that one life that one time by being in the right place at the right time....

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                Ahem. I looked this crap up.

                The STate of Missouri makes no law towards security guards.

                The City of St. Louis appoints special security officers, with limited police powers. They are not "Security Police," but do have police powers.

                The City of Kansas City, Kansas, appoints special security officers with limited police powers. They are not "police officers," but have police powers which are limited in scope.

                Other cities have similarly appointed citizens with special and extraordinary police powers.

                Witcha, for example, has Merchant Police, but these merchant police are not law enforcement officers under state or local law. They operate red/blue light via Witicha city permit.

                Michigan has Act 330 Security Police Officers, who are usually called "Act 330 Arrest Powers Security Guards," since "no one would call a guard a cop."

                SC makes it a criminal offense for a security company or person to refer to themselves by terms other than "protection" or "security." Police is very much illegal, and the security uniforms and vehicles must say SECURITY or PROTECTION. No other firm may have those words, btw, unless a guard firm.

                North Carolina has Company Police which aren't security at all, but private law enforcement agencies.

                Lets see, where else...

                I believe Springfield, Illinois has special Merchant Districts with Merchant Police. San Fransisco Special Patrol Officers are merchant police, but recently SFPD has noted that they may wear SFPD patches, they are not police officers and have "no arrest authority." In other words, they're BSIS security guards with the word police on their patch.

                Quite a few states do not regulate the term "police." Wisconsin is one, and while they hold no public authority (they're not cops), many companies use the term police, with private before and without.

                A shelf company I looked at buying once was Wisconsin Community Police. That's the entire company name. State said the name is fine.
                Don't forget Washington DC where you have to get a Special police commission to work as an armed officer. (found this job opening looking up the info, here.)

                Right now the terms are very confused, there is no standard, so I made my own to keep things straight in my head. Rember, this is MY list, other people and sources might not agree:

                --
                -"Private Security" : Wholly private security personell (armed or unarmed) who have NO special government or public authority beyond what any other citizen has but also has no extra legal constraints the same way some with public authority would either. Examples would be most of the private physical security industry.

                -"Public Security": Security personell who work directly for a government but aren't really given special powers. Around here that would be like the Dallas County Government Security, City of Dallas Security Division and such

                -"Security Police" (or Special Security) : Wholly private usually armed security officers who aren't commisioned by any government but by law have legal authority above that of normal citizens and usually aren't called police. SC Security officers are a great example. Merchant Police are another.
                --

                --
                -"Private Police" (maybe also "contract police") :This is where it gets hairy, this one is broad. State (or other government) commisioned officers who are usually called police by right, who do not directly work for a government and who have to attend training above what Armed Securitry officers have to, many times a police academy or atleast cut down police academy training.

                Examples: NC Company Police, Fed Ex Police, DC Special Police, Security Police officers on DOE contracts, Court Security officers on USMS contracts, Private hospital/Airport and campus police, RAILROAD Police (except Amtrak, thats public) ect ect ect ect


                -"Special District Police": Just as the name says, special district or Special purpose police officers who always work for a government agency or atleast quasi-governmental institution.

                An exotic example is the Black Butte Ranch police, who at 1st glance look like private police, but actually work for the special government district (the Butte ranch services district, the county appoints it's board) laid over the private property.

                Other examples are Public University/College Police, Public Schools police, public housing police, Transit police, Capital Police, US Supreme Court Police, U.S. parks police, Federal Reserve Police, Constables in some states and much more. I work for a Special Police Agency.
                --

                --
                -"Private Investigators": Self Explanitory

                -"Public Investigators": FBI, DEA, BATF, Texas Rangers, Georgia Bureau of Investigation, ect ect
                --


                -"Field Police" (general public police): Simply, what most people call police, the majority of public law enforcment, police agencies and their officers/troopers/agents/deputys. mainly, the "police for a geographic area".

                Plenty of overlap, in fact some agencies do more than one thing like the Secret Service (but public investigators and special police). But this is how I semi keep it all organized in my head, to keep it simple I veiw it all as "Protective Services".....

                ----

                On a side note, the names some people pick for their security companies are imo a bit borderline, like this on the Federal Detective Bureau in DC. There should be a law lol.
                Last edited by Black Caesar; 08-07-2007, 01:07 AM.
                ~Black Caesar~
                Corbier's Commandos

                " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

                Comment


                • #9
                  Minnesota's citizen arrest laws are so liberal that their really isn't the need for private police powers since any citizen can already arrest for a misdemeanor committed in their presence.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
                    An exotic example is the Black Butte Ranch police, who at 1st glance look like private police, but actually work for the special government district (the Butte ranch services district, the county appoints it's board) laid over the private property.
                    This dept is actually a true blue police dept. They are all certified through DPSST as Police Officers. They are tied into LEDS, and excercise all their "police" powers off of the property and even assist outside agencies-damn near all the time. (Read their logs) From warrant arrests, to traffic stops (and an occasional pursuit) you name it these guys do it.

                    BB Police are a very unique bread of cops. They actually work FOR the private property owners. Think of having a contract with a large (very large) home owners association, and having TEETH to go with the bark.

                    But there is a draw back. You see there is another private police dept in this great state of Oreogn that is nearly identical in it's setup and operation to Black Butte, is Sunriver Resort, they also have developed a Special Tax District and have Property Owners elected, or chosen by the County to serve on the Resort's Governing body.

                    The funny thing is that Sunriver's Board of Director's (remember they live there) got their panties in a bunch and changed the rules on the cops. They were told that they could not write any more traffic tickets, or pull people over. Since their decision was final, and since they are the governing body, they had no choice but to abide. This, obvioulsy, created a HUGE stir and after a few months they were allowed to resume writing tickets. I think a lawyer or two may have called the Board of Directors and told of the slight chance of liability if someone is breaking a traffic law, and that action that could've been prevented by their own police dept, resulted in the loss of life or serious injury to someone would bankrupt the Resort in a civil suit.

                    So, for a few months Sunriver Resort had the highest paid Security Officers in the Region!!! Not to mention an Retirement package, LOL And, they got to run red and blues, LMAO.
                    ~Super Ninja Sniper~
                    Corbier's Commandos

                    Nemo me impune lacessit

                    Grammical and Spelling errors may occur form time to time. Yoov bin worned

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                      Ahem. I looked this crap up.

                      The STate of Missouri makes no law towards security guards.

                      The City of St. Louis appoints special security officers, with limited police powers. They are not "Security Police," but do have police powers.

                      The City of Kansas City, Kansas, appoints special security officers with limited police powers. They are not "police officers," but have police powers which are limited in scope.

                      Other cities have similarly appointed citizens with special and extraordinary police powers.

                      Witcha, for example, has Merchant Police, but these merchant police are not law enforcement officers under state or local law. They operate red/blue light via Witicha city permit.

                      Michigan has Act 330 Security Police Officers, who are usually called "Act 330 Arrest Powers Security Guards," since "no one would call a guard a cop."

                      SC makes it a criminal offense for a security company or person to refer to themselves by terms other than "protection" or "security." Police is very much illegal, and the security uniforms and vehicles must say SECURITY or PROTECTION. No other firm may have those words, btw, unless a guard firm.

                      North Carolina has Company Police which aren't security at all, but private law enforcement agencies.

                      Lets see, where else...

                      I believe Springfield, Illinois has special Merchant Districts with Merchant Police. San Fransisco Special Patrol Officers are merchant police, but recently SFPD has noted that they may wear SFPD patches, they are not police officers and have "no arrest authority." In other words, they're BSIS security guards with the word police on their patch.

                      Quite a few states do not regulate the term "police." Wisconsin is one, and while they hold no public authority (they're not cops), many companies use the term police, with private before and without.

                      A shelf company I looked at buying once was Wisconsin Community Police. That's the entire company name. State said the name is fine.
                      San fransico patrol special officers had arrest powers until November 30, 1994 . When the San fransico police commision stripped them of their powers. Here's an article discussing their loss of police authority.

                      http://www.sfweekly.com/1995-04-19/news/cops-vs-cops/
                      "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
                        Minnesota's citizen arrest laws are so liberal that their really isn't the need for private police powers since any citizen can already arrest for a misdemeanor committed in their presence.
                        Sounds like our States citizen arrest criteria...
                        "We make a living by what we get, but we make a life by what we give" - Winston Churchill

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LPGuy View Post
                          Missouri does not consider all security officers to be special police officers. It appears that the city of Kansas City, Missouri has a special license that grants special police officer status to certain security officers, however.
                          Only those operating in St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri have police powers, and then only those with a class A license.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            DC has tons of SPECIAL POLICE OFFICERS (referred to as SPO's), who in fact have the same legal authority as any sworn police officer in DC on the property they are employed at. The DC Code clearly states that they have no police powers once they step outside of the building they are employed inside of and that they cannot be used to patrol public space or public streets. The problem is that most SPO's work for contract security companies and have no idea that they have police powers at all and the contract security company's aren't going to train or enlighten them as it just increases liability for the company. Also, many city police officer's don't know or recognize an SPO's authority to effect an actual arrest.

                            The reason for this mess is DC's Gun Ban, which only allows police officers to have firearms. Therefore there is no such thing as an "Armed Security Guard." So security companies employ Special Police Officers, who receive commissions as Special Officers of the Metropolitan Police Department, which allows them to carry guns (.38 revolvers).

                            It's a really messed up system, where armored car guards get commissioned as special police officers, just so that they can carry a gun on duty.
                            Last edited by mjw064; 01-22-2008, 10:08 AM.
                            Washington DC

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              In California,
                              official name of LEO is "Peace officer" and description of "Peace officer" are long list of Penal code section 830
                              because many Law Enforcement Officers are called different names as, Police, Deputy, Highway patrol, Park ranger,

                              California Peace officers have to be trained by P.O.S.T (Peace Officer's Standard Trainig) certified training program.
                              but in 830.34pc, Oregon State Police, the Nevada Department of Motor Vehicles and Public Safety, or the Arizona Department of Public Safety, and correctional officers are "California" peace officers, if condition meet.
                              (I don't think they took P.O.S.T. program)

                              Also, 830.4pc, California National Guard are "Peace officer" when condition meet. (I don't think they took POST either)

                              830.7pc include some type of Security with limited authority. so as other Peace officers has limited conditions.


                              830.8 Federal agency, Indian Tribal police officer, animal control are excuded from "California" Peace officer .
                              but they have Power to arrest as California peace officer.

                              Difference between Citizen's arrest and Peace officer's arrest are many way.
                              but mostly,
                              Peace officers may arrest if "he has reasonable cause for believing" for any public offence.

                              Citizen's arrest has to be in his presence (Except Felony)
                              but "When a felony has been in fact committed, and he has reasonable cause for believing"

                              vs Peace officer's arrest was
                              "The officer has probable cause to believe that the person to be arrested has committed a felony, whether or not a felony, in fact, has been committed.

                              When Security arrest person which security thought it was felony offence but it was not felony and was not on his presence, Security may face to Criminal (illegal arrest) and civil liability but not for Peace officer's arrest.

                              misdemeanor charge for "Resisting to arrest" to Peace officer and "escape and attempt to escape from custody and arrest" from "Peace officer" will not apply to "Citizen's arrest".
                              836pc and 837pc

                              also "disarm (taking firearm) from peace officer" is not apply to security (Citizens)
                              additional charge as "Assault or battery to peace officer" is not apply to security (it will be just regular assault or battery)

                              when suspect resist and hit security (citizen), it will be Just battery charge and NOT resisting to arrest nor assault to peace officer.

                              also, California self defence require "Retreat if possible" before use weapons to defend themselves (except inside of own resident)
                              but California peace officers do not need retreat before defend themselves.

                              Peace officer may release suspect or book him after arrest (peace officer have choice to book or release)
                              Vs once citizen arrest person, arresting party MUST take him to peace officer (Citizen may not release once he arrest somebody)
                              Peace officer can arrest first then think.
                              Citizen's arrest is final. if he arrest somebody he has no authority to release him.
                              If action was wrong, arresting party may face to both criminal and civil liability.
                              Addition to P/O's releasing authority, P/O's arrest is protected from civil liability.
                              Citizens(Security) have to think twice and three times before arrest sombody or risk himself to civil and criminal liability which peace officers are waived from.

                              Peace officer has power to detain (Not arrest yet, but person is not free to go, mostly for questioning and traffic stop, issuing citation etc)
                              Civilian (Security) may not detain (except retail security).
                              arrest or let him go freely.

                              Security may search for Weapon, nothing but weapon search AFTER arrest(include retail security).
                              they may not search weapon nor touch BEFORE arrest.

                              As far as I remember now for difference between P/O and Security is those but P/O are protected many other way by law.
                              Last edited by Limo LA; 01-22-2008, 06:50 PM.
                              Not many but few chauffeurs are armed to protect clients.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X