Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Cis

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • locknid
    replied
    too bad phoenix pd basically kicked COPS out awhile back because some officer decided to go a little too far for the camera. Phoenix would be a great city, tons of crazy stuff happening all the time.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    Originally posted by Hank1 View Post
    Yes I have, on 3 seperate ocassions. Furthermore, during a traffic stop on one of our housing communities on 15th Street (Tampa) a COPS 2 man film crew (sound man and camera man) jumped out with a female SES Deputy. They pulled over a subject for not using his turn signal and determined that the driver had numerous priors for marijuana possession/use. She requested and received permission to search his car. The deputy found nothing but gave him a ticket the violation. I was her cover officer and protected her (which we do often) during her search. The camera caught me many times as she was talking with me and twice focused on my shoulder patch. I am assuming that the 30 minute traffic stop will not make it past the editing room floor because her search yeilded nothing at all. Secondly, the show is titled "COPS" and not "Security Officers" LOL! So, I have had my 15 minutes of fame I think......

    Be safe,

    Hank
    That must be the female deputy that they had on the show. I believe she said she was the only female in the unit. She looked to be maybe 5 feet tall in shoes. I give small females credit for becoming LEO's though. It can be a daunting task for big guys, I can't imagine being 5-2 and 100 pounds and doing the job.

    I actually see more female LEO's than Security Officers. Our local force has around 100 sworn females out of 550 cops. That is a much higher percentage than I see around here in security work.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
    Have you seen the COPS shows that have been in Hillsborough County lately? They seem pretty interesting. Especially the one with the tranny dressed as Pochahontas!

    Ever see any of those deputies at your sites? I know it was cool when COPS was in Minneapolis a long time ago to see cops and sights that I knew.
    Yes I have, on 3 seperate ocassions. Furthermore, during a traffic stop on one of our housing communities on 15th Street (Tampa) a COPS 2 man film crew (sound man and camera man) jumped out with a female SES Deputy. They pulled over a subject for not using his turn signal and determined that the driver had numerous priors for marijuana possession/use. She requested and received permission to search his car. The deputy found nothing but gave him a ticket the violation. I was her cover officer and protected her (which we do often) during her search. The camera caught me many times as she was talking with me and twice focused on my shoulder patch. I am assuming that the 30 minute traffic stop will not make it past the editing room floor because her search yeilded nothing at all. Secondly, the show is titled "COPS" and not "Security Officers" LOL! So, I have had my 15 minutes of fame I think......

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
    Have you seen the COPS shows that have been in Hillsborough County lately? They seem pretty interesting. Especially the one with the tranny dressed as Pochahontas!
    LMAO I remember seeing that episode, nearly as entertaining as the 'vertically challenged individual' who kept trying to climb the lamp post to avoid the LEO (who ended up finding the guy a job)

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    Have you seen the COPS shows that have been in Hillsborough County lately? They seem pretty interesting. Especially the one with the tranny dressed as Pochahontas!

    Ever see any of those deputies at your sites? I know it was cool when COPS was in Minneapolis a long time ago to see cops and sights that I knew.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    [QUOTE=N. A. Corbier;36462]
    Originally posted by Hank1 View Post

    There are some problems with Florida law that displease me. I've worked with FASCO and a few other organizations to try to fix some of them.

    Here's my biggest problem with with Florida law: A property owner may remove a trespasser by force. A Class D licensee may not. Chapter 493.6118(j) overrides the use of force statute, making your use of force illegal.

    I know that this sounds odd, and contrary to our training. Billy Holcomb read several of my posts on this, and came to the same conclusion, starting a campaign to get this turned around.

    Florida law makes it extremely hard to protect the interests of our clients as licensed security officers. While an untrained bellhop may pick a man up and throw him out, the licensed security officer doing so commits a crime of violence which can result in arrest (All 493 violations are misdemeanors), loss of license, fine for licensee, and fine for employing licensee.

    FASCO's detention bill, which would of allowed licensed security officers to do something very important towards property rehabilitation: Holding, Identifying, and having trespassed from the property unwanted elements; had a fatal flaw. You could not use force to detain unless your safety was threatened by physical attack.

    Since you require to use offensive force to gain compliance in a physical arrest or detention, you become the aggressor (lawfully) like the police officer does. Unfortunately, the police officer does not have 493.6118(j) stating that any use of force contrary to defense from physical attack is a crime.

    Getting residents to communicate is important, but so is being able to identify and remove the threat. And Florida laws are designed to stand in the way of that, unless you can tote around a police officer with you.

    You are preaching to the choir my friend! I cannot argue with you.....

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    [QUOTE=Hank1;36444]
    Originally posted by bigdog View Post

    Dog~
    CIS' policies are more strict than Florida law says a S/O can do (as any agency can be) ....For us to detain on a subject on a felony commited in our presence it has to forciable/violent in nature only, i.e. Domestic violence, Agg. Battery car jacking. Otherwise, we become good witnesses for the proscecution later on down the road. But, progress / success in a crime riddled community goes beyond detaining the bad guys!!! It's getting the residents to participate, trespassing ect., ect. Most criminologists are of the belief that long term crime reduction is rehabilitation and stabilization......Not immediate arrests/detention as they are most likely short term fixes. This is why CIS has had success in it's policies and methodologies. With respect to breach of peace issues, we stand by and notify local LE.

    Be safe,

    Hank
    There are some problems with Florida law that displease me. I've worked with FASCO and a few other organizations to try to fix some of them.

    Here's my biggest problem with with Florida law: A property owner may remove a trespasser by force. A Class D licensee may not. Chapter 493.6118(j) overrides the use of force statute, making your use of force illegal.

    I know that this sounds odd, and contrary to our training. Billy Holcomb read several of my posts on this, and came to the same conclusion, starting a campaign to get this turned around.

    Florida law makes it extremely hard to protect the interests of our clients as licensed security officers. While an untrained bellhop may pick a man up and throw him out, the licensed security officer doing so commits a crime of violence which can result in arrest (All 493 violations are misdemeanors), loss of license, fine for licensee, and fine for employing licensee.

    FASCO's detention bill, which would of allowed licensed security officers to do something very important towards property rehabilitation: Holding, Identifying, and having trespassed from the property unwanted elements; had a fatal flaw. You could not use force to detain unless your safety was threatened by physical attack.

    Since you require to use offensive force to gain compliance in a physical arrest or detention, you become the aggressor (lawfully) like the police officer does. Unfortunately, the police officer does not have 493.6118(j) stating that any use of force contrary to defense from physical attack is a crime.

    Getting residents to communicate is important, but so is being able to identify and remove the threat. And Florida laws are designed to stand in the way of that, unless you can tote around a police officer with you.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Hussard
    replied
    I love your Anti-terrosim officer men you are more equiped then police force i think i will move to florida lol your chief financial officer had a french canadian name he come from quebec

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    [QUOTE=bigdog;36422]
    Originally posted by Hank1 View Post

    you guys are taught that a private citizen can arrest for a breach of peace right? and that Citizens arrest for felonies only is company policy and not state law?
    Dog~
    CIS' policies are more strict than Florida law says a S/O can do (as any agency can be) ....For us to detain on a subject on a felony commited in our presence it has to forciable/violent in nature only, i.e. Domestic violence, Agg. Battery car jacking. Otherwise, we become good witnesses for the proscecution later on down the road. But, progress / success in a crime riddled community goes beyond detaining the bad guys!!! It's getting the residents to participate, trespassing ect., ect. Most criminologists are of the belief that long term crime reduction is rehabilitation and stabilization......Not immediate arrests/detention as they are most likely short term fixes. This is why CIS has had success in it's policies and methodologies. With respect to breach of peace issues, we stand by and notify local LE.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    [quote=Hank1;36383]
    Originally posted by bigdog View Post
    Hank , does CIS allow you to make citizens arrests for both breach of peace and felonies or just felonies?[/QUOTE

    Citizens arrest for felonies only....
    you guys are taught that a private citizen can arrest for a breach of peace right? and that Citizens arrest for felonies only is company policy and not state law?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    [QUOTE=bigdog;36376]Hank , does CIS allow you to make citizens arrests for both breach of peace and felonies or just felonies?[/QUOTE

    Citizens arrest for felonies only....

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    Hank , does CIS allow you to make citizens arrests for both breach of peace and felonies or just felonies?

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    Originally posted by locknid View Post
    I have been to CIS website and like what I see, too bad I live on the complete opposite side of the US. The company I work for is much newer and smaller than CIS but does much of the same thing when it comes to multi-housing communities. We can clean up the worst properties in a matter of days to weeks, it's amazing. Too bad there aren't more companies with the effectiveness and professionalism as CIS.

    Also what is your arrest policy when you don't have police present. thanks
    No arrest powers than the average Joe! We are not LE. It is the philosophies and methodologies CIS has developed over the past 20 years. We are effective because of our systems, officers, supervisors and training the officer receives that make us successful.....Not to mention our relationship with local LE.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • locknid
    replied
    I have been to CIS website and like what I see, too bad I live on the complete opposite side of the US. The company I work for is much newer and smaller than CIS but does much of the same thing when it comes to multi-housing communities. We can clean up the worst properties in a matter of days to weeks, it's amazing. Too bad there aren't more companies with the effectiveness and professionalism as CIS.

    Also what is your arrest policy when you don't have police present. thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    A happy crew work together more efficiently and more importantly more effectively!

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X