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Which AHA CPR course should Security Guards take?

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by Blade Runner View Post
    I'm a Fireman as well as a S/O, so all my training (cpr, first aid, aed, etc.) was and is taken care of through my FD.
    I was also a FF. Fire Department paid for and took care of everything too. Now that I'm no longer with them it's a royal pain trying to keep everything up.

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  • Blade Runner
    replied
    I'm a Fireman as well as a S/O, so all my training (cpr, first aid, aed, etc.) was and is taken care of through my FD.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    Around here training is easy to get. Its offered at the local junior college. But yeah, its a pain to do. I almost forgot about arranging hospital observation time, ambulance ride along time (I need to check and see if its still emt 1a only or if they're doing b now too) and those fun recerts.

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    FYI, Similar Security/EMT jobs can be found in area casinos.

    https://www.hrapply.com/pngaming/App...t.jsp&op=reset

    http://www.belleofbatonrouge.com/employment/#353

    Just so you know.

    Steve

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Oh, and ddog, when I mentioned having the equiptment available I'll clarify that my primary duty at the plant is as an EMT responder. Because of that I get a van for patrols and responding, a minivan not an ambulance, with gear such as Spine board, folding litter, BLS bags, O2 cylinder and other gear. Here's a shot of the inside of our messy little van. Nothing fancy but it's ok.

    Upon being hired I was also required to provide my own BP cuff and stethescope.
    Additionally I am responsible for administering Kroll Lab drug screens (pee in the cup) on employees after accidents or if suspected of working impaired. I also see employees for medical complaints such as puking and snotting. I give out Imodium, Tylanol and PeptoBismol nightly. This is done at the plant in our little First aid/nurses clinic.
    When not doing medical related work I'm at the main gate sitting at the desk answering phones and logging in vehicles with the guard/s.
    Hoping these posts give you a good idea of what you are looking for.

    Steve

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    The reason I wouldn't recommend going for the EMT-B level is that, unless you are working in a EMS/Medical capacity with the gear available to you then it's really overkill.
    First Responder covers most of the subjects found in the EMT-B course, Splinting, bandaging, spinal and O2 admin, etc. That is why I can get Continuing Ed hours sitting in on First responder classes and assisting the instructor. The FR course is considerably shorter, 48 vs 130 hours, and doesn't require half the continuing education and recert hours that EMT-B does.
    Trust me. It's a bitch to find the training if you don't work in the EMS field. We are working right now to get our Security Company to assist us with finding classes and paying for them.
    I tell most people that EMT is like a advanced First Responder class. The difference in the two, as I explain sometimes, is with First Responder they teach you to do certain things on scene. With EMT-B you start to get into anatomy, more details about how things work and you learn WHY you do certain things on scene.
    Example, a First Responder is taught how to obtain a blood pressure. After that it's just a couple of numbers that get written down and given to the EMS crew when they arrive. EMT-B class explains how the heart beats, about blood flow and factors which can affect the readings we get when obtaining BP. So now you have the same numbers the FR has but you know a bit more about what they mean.
    Get what I'm saying? I hope this helped some.

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  • Chimpie
    replied
    Originally posted by mh892 View Post
    I don't have references handy, but, in Florida you are covered by the Good Samaritan Law if you attempt to assist someone needing immediate help.
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    I can't imagine why they'd be worried about liability. If you perform as trained you're covered by the good samaritan laws.
    That depends. If you are responding as a lay citizen, then yes, you are covered by the Good Samaritan Law. However, if you are responding as part of your job duties you are not covered. Hopefully your employer and his insurance will cover you <snicker> but there are also companies out there that you can buy coverage from for only a couple of hundred bucks a year.

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  • EH126
    replied
    If it's affordable, I'd go for either first responder or EMT-B training. It has helped save lives at the site I work at.

    One our guys used his EMT-B training to save an infant one time. Of course the minimum training has helped us numerous times as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • craig333
    replied
    I can't imagine why they'd be worried about liability. If you perform as trained you're covered by the good samaritan laws.

    I've had cpr and first aid (and later emt) training since back when they were still teaching the pre-cordial thump.
    So, while I haven't yet done cpr on anyone, I've performed first aid more than a few times. Interesting thing is, you always think in terms of helping a stranger, but at least with me, its been 1)co-workers mostly (and some that I could not have helped with just basic first aid) more than anything. 2)friends and family. 3)strangers.
    Something to think about if you want to just get the minimum training.

    Leave a comment:


  • UtahProtectionForce
    replied
    with the company i work for we have AED, First AID, CPR and EMT-B, certs... not all officers a required to have them, it is optional, except some sites require them..

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  • ddog
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
    My job assignment requires me to have Healthcare Provider CPR and to be a National Registered EMT-Basic.
    At the plant where I'm assigned there are about a dozen plant employees who take annual Medical First Responder classes.
    For non medical related Security jobs I think you'd be fine with the 4 hour non certified CPR course and then you can carry a pocket mask or face shield on a key ring. The Red Cross First Aid course shoud be enough unless you will have access to BLS gear such as back boards or O2 tanks in your job setting. That's when you get into the stuff First Responder certification covers.
    Yeah, that's what I wanted to know. I am not going to assume the equipment is available so cpr and first aid from MTI and Bluecross for $55 + CPR book and 8 hours. That should be well worth the money and time. I started investigating options when I saw your name EMTGuard, lol. Thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • gcmc security part 2
    replied
    First Responder is now the minimum required for all Firefighters in the state of Florida. Used to be all that was required was CPR and basic first aid. The course isn't too bad and covers some good aspects. Definitely more than just your run of the mill first aid class, but not anything super fancy. A good course I'd recommend for security

    Leave a comment:


  • mh892
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    U. S. Security Associates dba Advance Metro Security required every guard to sign a form stating they are not authorized to perform CPR, First Aid, or otherwise intervene.

    Securex Services, now part of ITS International, must of got a copy of the identical one, cause they had the same form with a different logo.

    Weiser Security also made me sign the form as part of my employment packet.

    Not every company does this, but the warm body outfits seem to love to limit exposure by removing what you can do.
    Dear Lord. That is an absolute sin. Telling one person they are restricted from assisting another in need, citeing financial fears.

    Leave a comment:


  • FrankW438
    replied
    The contract I work on requires all S/O's to have current, valid CPR and First AID training. We used to use Red Cross Adult/infant/child CPR and First AID, but we recently switched to Heartsaver's. I am not really all that impressed with Heartsavers, but I may be biased because I used to teach Red Cross classes for a previous employer.

    I haven't heard of any employer barring a S/O from providing aid, but I can see the liability issues that may concern some companies. I am curious about whether or not any of you are REQUIRED to give aid in an emergency. Do your post orders/company policy state that you MUST give aid in a medical emergency? Most of the places I have worked previously encouraged it, but left some room for officer's discretion.

    -- Frank

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  • EMTGuard
    replied
    My job assignment requires me to have Healthcare Provider CPR and to be a National Registered EMT-Basic.
    At the plant where I'm assigned there are about a dozen plant employees who take annual Medical First Responder classes.
    For non medical related Security jobs I think you'd be fine with the 4 hour non certified CPR course and then you can carry a pocket mask or face shield on a key ring. The Red Cross First Aid course shoud be enough unless you will have access to BLS gear such as back boards or O2 tanks in your job setting. That's when you get into the stuff First Responder certification covers.

    Leave a comment:

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