Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Which AHA CPR course should Security Guards take?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Which AHA CPR course should Security Guards take?

    Our local Manatee Technical Institute has a BLS for Healthcare Providers which looks like it uses all kiinds of equipment and is certified for 8 hrs of class.

    http://www.manateetechnicalinstitute..._provider.html

    And then there's a CPR for Family and friends non-certified at 4 hrs which looks like it has the tools I'd have available: none.

    http://www.manateetechnicalinstitute...pr_family.html

    I just didn't know if there would be any advantage of the certified course since it would be 'mostly' with healthcare provider tools. Seems like a good tool to have so I won't look like a dumbass in an emergency. Had some CPR training in the US Army Basic Training, but it was a total of 10 minutes training, tops. And "D" class Security training basically said this is good training to have.

    Thanks for any help

  • #2
    Since I am a strong believer that Security Guards should be First Responders in ALL emergencies I would go for the best one offered within my price range. I'd also suggest the 45 hour First Responder course.
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

    Comment


    • #3
      I'm not currently an emt, but I'm sure glad I had the training. Most basic first aid courses are barely worth the time. One of the best things you learn is not to panic.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by ddog View Post
        Our local Manatee Technical Institute has a BLS for Healthcare Providers which looks like it uses all kiinds of equipment and is certified for 8 hrs of class.

        http://www.manateetechnicalinstitute..._provider.html

        And then there's a CPR for Family and friends non-certified at 4 hrs which looks like it has the tools I'd have available: none.

        http://www.manateetechnicalinstitute...pr_family.html

        I just didn't know if there would be any advantage of the certified course since it would be 'mostly' with healthcare provider tools. Seems like a good tool to have so I won't look like a dumbass in an emergency. Had some CPR training in the US Army Basic Training, but it was a total of 10 minutes training, tops. And "D" class Security training basically said this is good training to have.

        Thanks for any help
        Go across the street from MTI-East campus to the American Red Cross and take their Emergency Response (First Responder) class. It is well worth the money. If they don't offer it there, drop me a PM and I'll see when the next time the Sarasota County ARC is having theirs. Heck, I may even be helping teach it.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Chimpie View Post
          Go across the street from MTI-East campus to the American Red Cross and take their Emergency Response (First Responder) class. It is well worth the money. If they don't offer it there, drop me a PM and I'll see when the next time the Sarasota County ARC is having theirs. Heck, I may even be helping teach it.
          From looking on Bradenton's site, it looks like Emergency Response is a class that will require 6 students to sign up for a class. I'll give them a call. That looks good and may need the CPR beforehand anyway.

          EMT looks a little time consuming and a little beyond my aspirations of medical duty and liability: don't want to be called everytime medical liabililty raises its ugly head, ha-ha. I just want to do my job properly, and those two courses you cite look adequate. There are so many other things to be concerned about learning with new jobs, schedules, bosses, and getting proper body armor.

          I appreciate the heads up, and am looking forward to this new challenge. It involves mastering many things I've always wanted to do, but never could seem to work in. I'm actually pretty happy Just glad I found this site! Thank You!

          Comment


          • #6
            ARC First Responder is fine for security in Florida. Three things to remember.

            1. Your client or company may prohibit you from performing life-saving measures (including BLS or CPR) while on duty. This does not violate the "duty to report" statute as it is merely a duty to report, not provide heroic life-saving measures.

            2. Unless you're going for a FD/Ambulance Service, having EMT is going to be next to useless in Florida.

            3. First Aid for Healthcare Providers is for healthcare workers in clinical settings. You wouldn't be authorized to touch anything, even if you did have it, since you do not work under a medical director.

            4. First Responder through ARC is the "advanced" version of the First Aid class the state "suggests" you take. Generally, the state recongizes that some security personnel may wish to make a personal decision as to saving someone's life and requires basic (very basic) first aid which amounts to teaching: Call 911.

            5. Make sure you didn't sign anything, or your post orders don't state, that you will be terminated if you take heroic measures (this is basically doing anything more than calling 911) on the firm's time.

            6. Unlike Quebec, Florida only has a duty to report, not intervene.
            Some Kind of Commando Leader

            "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
              ARC First Responder is fine for security in Florida. Three things to remember.

              1. Your client or company may prohibit you from performing life-saving measures (including BLS or CPR) while on duty. This does not violate the "duty to report" statute as it is merely a duty to report, not provide heroic life-saving measures.

              2. Unless you're going for a FD/Ambulance Service, having EMT is going to be next to useless in Florida.

              3. First Aid for Healthcare Providers is for healthcare workers in clinical settings. You wouldn't be authorized to touch anything, even if you did have it, since you do not work under a medical director.

              4. First Responder through ARC is the "advanced" version of the First Aid class the state "suggests" you take. Generally, the state recongizes that some security personnel may wish to make a personal decision as to saving someone's life and requires basic (very basic) first aid which amounts to teaching: Call 911.

              5. Make sure you didn't sign anything, or your post orders don't state, that you will be terminated if you take heroic measures (this is basically doing anything more than calling 911) on the firm's time.

              6. Unlike Quebec, Florida only has a duty to report, not intervene.
              Well, I was going to ask my new bosses to see if they would pay for it . I'd like to feel more confident to support someone better while waiting on 911 response time, so would probably go ahead with the classes anyway. I realize its not going to be certified RN type stuff anyway. I just feel the liability of doing something bonehead compared to doing my job in a professional manner, is a significant difference. It seems like a worthwhile investment for 3 one-half days.

              I've had business law and understand the liabilities; and definitely do not blame the companies for not trusting a non-certified $10/hr Guard to preform emt duties.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                6. Unlike Quebec, Florida only has a duty to report, not intervene.
                BTW it is federal law (Canadian Criminal Code that says if you have been trained to provide the aid & someone needs the aid, you must provide it, not Quebec law.

                I'm always amazed at the differences in our 2 countries. We have 1 Criminal Code for the whole country, the provinces take care of other things like workers safety etc. Your States have their own crininal codes (you can even get the death penalty in one state but not the other) yet you have things that are federally run like OSHA.
                I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                  3. First Aid for Healthcare Providers is for healthcare workers in clinical settings. You wouldn't be authorized to touch anything, even if you did have it, since you do not work under a medical director.
                  As a certified EMt and CPR instructor I have to disagree with these statements. Healthcare Provider CR does not need medical direction. This may be different where you are from but generally you do not need a medical director. This is meant for Police,Fire, EMS, Doctors , Nurse any one who is likely to be a professional rescuer. Security can also fall under this field. The healthcare provider covers one and two rescuer CPR , AED and BVM. So anyone likely to be at a post with AED should have this training. Now this may be different near you But AHA doesnt require medical direction for CPR in this level.
                  Robert
                  Here endith the lesson

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                    ARC First Responder is fine for security in Florida. Three things to remember.

                    1. Your client or company may prohibit you from performing life-saving measures (including BLS or CPR) while on duty. This does not violate the "duty to report" statute as it is merely a duty to report, not provide heroic life-saving measures.

                    2. Unless you're going for a FD/Ambulance Service, having EMT is going to be next to useless in Florida.

                    3. First Aid for Healthcare Providers is for healthcare workers in clinical settings. You wouldn't be authorized to touch anything, even if you did have it, since you do not work under a medical director.

                    4. First Responder through ARC is the "advanced" version of the First Aid class the state "suggests" you take. Generally, the state recongizes that some security personnel may wish to make a personal decision as to saving someone's life and requires basic (very basic) first aid which amounts to teaching: Call 911.

                    5. Make sure you didn't sign anything, or your post orders don't state, that you will be terminated if you take heroic measures (this is basically doing anything more than calling 911) on the firm's time.

                    6. Unlike Quebec, Florida only has a duty to report, not intervene.
                    One more small thing we might disagree on Nathan. I personaly don't know of any company that would think of preventing an employee from giving aid. Not a smart business move, I would think. I don't have references handy, but, in Florida you are covered by the Good Samaritan Law if you attempt to assist someone needing immediate help. Of course one should act within one's scope/level of training in an effort to preserve life or give aid. As for my personal feelings on the matter. It doesn't matter if I'm on the clock or not I will (have) stop to evaluate and offer/give what assistance I can to a person in need of immediate attention. It's just the right thing to do.
                    Sorry if that sounds old fashion but thats the way I was raised.
                    Last edited by mh892; 08-06-2007, 01:39 AM.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We are all first responders and we respond to medicals all across our corporate campus, even in the restaurants and other leased spaces. We will not respond to a security incident in a leased space, but we will respond to a medical.

                      It seems stupid that some companies would actually forbid a trained employee from rendering life saving first aid. But, there are companies out there, a lot of them, that prevent you from intervening if an employee is getting beaten up right in front of you. Nothing in security really surprises me.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
                        We are all first responders and we respond to medicals all across our corporate campus, even in the restaurants and other leased spaces. We will not respond to a security incident in a leased space, but we will respond to a medical.

                        It seems stupid that some companies would actually forbid a trained employee from rendering life saving first aid. But, there are companies out there, a lot of them, that prevent you from intervening if an employee is getting beaten up right in front of you. Nothing in security really surprises me.
                        We don't patrol the leased areas (Banquet halls, restaurant, bar & garage) but we do respond security incidents even in these leased places.
                        I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                        Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          U. S. Security Associates dba Advance Metro Security required every guard to sign a form stating they are not authorized to perform CPR, First Aid, or otherwise intervene.

                          Securex Services, now part of ITS International, must of got a copy of the identical one, cause they had the same form with a different logo.

                          Weiser Security also made me sign the form as part of my employment packet.

                          Not every company does this, but the warm body outfits seem to love to limit exposure by removing what you can do.
                          Some Kind of Commando Leader

                          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
                            U. S. Security Associates dba Advance Metro Security required every guard to sign a form stating they are not authorized to perform CPR, First Aid, or otherwise intervene.

                            Securex Services, now part of ITS International, must of got a copy of the identical one, cause they had the same form with a different logo.

                            Weiser Security also made me sign the form as part of my employment packet.

                            Not every company does this, but the warm body outfits seem to love to limit exposure by removing what you can do.
                            Shameful, absolutely shameful. Not surprising though. I wonder if all the employees at their sites realize that the officer, even if trained in first aid/CPR, is just going to stand there and watch them die after calling 911.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              This is one of the reasons why I have refused several offers from security companies here in Florida. The flat out refusal to respond to emergencies.

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X