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10 Codes poll

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  • ycaso77
    replied
    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
    I was surprised to see security still using ten codes. I was working for CDF at the time they transitioned from 10-codes to clear text and it went very smoothly. Was handy to have them buried in my memory when I got this job.
    We still use them. Helps when there's 4 different departments so you know when the other guys have something. Also cuts down on those endless radio transmissions.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    My understanding is that ICS/NIMS doesn't require agencies to use plain-language for normal everyday operations - just emergency multiagency situations that would activate the command/incident system.
    Correct, but to prevent confusion during such incidents local agencies have started dropping 10 codes entirely. My local 911 dispatch/EOC switched to plain speech last year. When I worked for Baton Rouge EMS/911 during Christmas last year most of the 10 codes had been dropped and we were told that all would be eliminated soon.
    It's the Train as you Fight metality.

    Leave a comment:


  • EMTGuard
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    EMT/GUARD I'm a long time scanner buff. What's your Yahoo group?
    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/scanbatonrouge/

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    I've currently got 4, 2 portables, one mobile rig & an antiquated Realistic Pro-2011 desktop... they keep you company on those long overnight static shifts
    And good supervisory tools. After I finish my shift at 23h00 the Officers working at the 3 hotels are supposed to call me as soon as they can when an emergency has occured. They all know that they better because I'm usually listening to my scanner & will catch them if they don't.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post
    That would cost money. Most companies only train when you come to work, because the client will not pay for additional training hours.

    Only the largest companies, and those who are smart enough to make the client pay for training time, can afford in-service training.
    Ah... I was referring to those few optimum minutes prior to change of shift, that's the time I utilise (in my other employment) to familiarise new staff/casuals with workplace layout, fire & safety etc.

    I'm not a Senior SO nor a Supervisor... but I'd presume that would be the best time to 'go over' radio protocol with non-compliant (or unseasoned) SO's perhaps on a one-to-one basis?

    How do you (or anyone here) assist new SO's into a companies operational practices?


    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    It certainly is . It<s been my hobby for about 35 years now. I remember my first, one of the Radio Shack models that took crystals & had 4 flashing leds! Now it's a Bearcat Unicen digital truck tracker with hundreds of channels!
    I've never owned one of those but I've seen one used by a volunteer fire fighter

    I've currently got 4, 2 portables, one mobile rig & an antiquated Realistic Pro-2011 desktop... they keep you company on those long overnight static shifts
    Last edited by Maelstrom; 07-30-2007, 09:44 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • DarkMetalWolf
    replied
    This is a good debate. Having used several different forms of 10 codes for years, I think they are both obsolete and necessary depending on the company. For ex sample, for those cheap companies out the that give you a radio so old that you can no longer even buy parts or chargers for them and they only work about 25% of the time, then 10 codes are necessary for that short and sweet transmission and you hope it got out. Then you have companies that give you decent equipment that works 95% of the time, depending on location of course, and issue you an "ear piece" to go with it. Thus making the 10 codes obsolete giving officers the ability to talk normally with more details. I do believe technology is good enough to get rid of the 10 codes. Not to mention, out here in Sacramento, just about all of the companies have different 10 codes. Which does cause confusion to officers that have learned one set of ten codes then goes to another company that is using another form of the 10 codes. In an emergency situation you do not want to have people standing there going..... huh? I do hate to say it, but it does happen especially when security out here has a high turn over rate and it seems officers bounce from company to company. Now I understand that training is the solution....... If the company will train you to use their 10 codes. There are those companies that say here and go there then you never see anyone again until payday. Just my two cents........

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  • Hank1
    replied
    I have to say that I am torn between using them and tossing them. All of the previous texts are excellent replies. I can see making the obselete. But 10 and signal codes pertaining to sensitive incidents should remain. Incidents such as anything related to children or medical (Universal precautions) for communicable diseases. Excellent topic and even better debate. Just my thoughts.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    As am I... it's infectious isn't it?


    As for emergency codes, they do still use those here though not the 10 codes as such, however any good scanner magazine/handbook contains these details

    If SO's are having difficulty using the radios correctly... sounds like a pre-duty inservice session eh?
    That would cost money. Most companies only train when you come to work, because the client will not pay for additional training hours.

    Only the largest companies, and those who are smart enough to make the client pay for training time, can afford in-service training.

    Leave a comment:


  • Qarlo X64
    replied
    I'm in favor of keeping them in all honesty. I find it easier to rack off the numbers and know what it means than to put out a full sentence, but that comes from years of using the 10 codes. I do like the alternative I've used with other PSCs in the past though, where it's a Nokia Cellphone Network walkie-talkie set up and you can speak normally too. What I'm in favor of keeping but seems to be used less and less is the Alphabet Codes.

    I'd rather tell S/Os 271 and 140 to 10-25 me at Sierra Tango than to say, "S/Os in my sector link up at Super Target". In the past there were problems with ppl on your end overhearing where you wanted to meet someone and you'd have a wave of rubberneckers there before you got there, using the military phonetics makes more sense to me, but most PSCs aren't really using them and most Security Directors don't bother to learn them themselves sadly.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by Maelstrom View Post
    As am I... it's infectious isn't it?
    It certainly is . It<s been my hobby for about 35 years now. I remember my first, one of the Radio Shack models that took crystals & had 4 flashing leds! Now it's a Bearcat Unicen digital truck tracker with hundreds of channels!

    Leave a comment:


  • jeff194307
    replied
    At the college where I work, their are radios in every dorm carried by resident managers. There are also a switchboard that has the main transmitter and as many as 6 security officers. We use the ten code simply to abbriviate radio traffic. Ther could be an emergancy situation suddenly happen at any of these locations and the ten code is the quickest way to let others know that help is needed. The real problem with ten codes is that they ar not standardized accross the country and this needs to be done. I had to re-learn the codes after using the west coast ten code for 15 or so years.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity View Post
    EMT/GUARD I'm a long time scanner buff. What's your Yahoo group?
    As am I... it's infectious isn't it?


    As for emergency codes, they do still use those here though not the 10 codes as such, however any good scanner magazine/handbook contains these details

    If SO's are having difficulty using the radios correctly... sounds like a pre-duty inservice session eh?
    Last edited by Maelstrom; 07-30-2007, 01:29 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • FireEMSPolice
    replied
    I am actually trying to implement them at my mall. I already know my Assistant Security Manager is against them. I dont know how the management feels either. We also need to get people to know how to use the radio first. We have officers who will read a novel over the radio and others who will "force their traffic" regardless of what the dispatchers have going on, such as:

    SEO: 46 (unit #) clear escort
    Dispatch: clear

    or

    SEO: 46 (unit #)
    Dispatch: Standby land-line
    SEO: I will be clear of the escort

    people at my work can be dumb with the radios

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    We never thought of 10-codes as a "secret"...just an efficient way to communicate. It's not much different from other "trade lingos" that use various abbreviations, etc. to communicate efficiently.

    Hang around a nursing desk and you'll hear sort of the same kind of thing:

    "Hang vanco on 410B stat"...."Start an IV line with vancomycin on the patient in room 410, bed B immediately."

    "Room B is PERRLA"..."The patient's pupils in exam room B are equal, round, reactive to light and accommodation"

    ...etc. Not 10-codes, but the same idea.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 07-30-2007, 03:22 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
    Yeah but they aren't getting Homeland Security grants from the US government and don't have to comply with ICS/NIMS as US departments are.
    My understanding is that ICS/NIMS doesn't require agencies to use plain-language for normal everyday operations - just emergency multiagency situations that would activate the command/incident system.

    Leave a comment:

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