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  • Charger
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    I don't think most of these considerations are really that important for the city police department now. State HP and some counties, yes. London, Hong Kong, Stockholm, Berlin and many other large city PDs do just fine without driving around in full-size vehicles.
    That may be true, and I won't argue that some city/municipal departments don't have a huge need for large, high-performance vehicles. (Hence NYPD's love of the Impala, for example) But again, there's the issue that very few departments train their officers on FWD emergency driving. That alone is a huge issue for departments, as they'd rather stick with vehicles they're already familiar with, than spend some huge amount of money to re-train everybody. Especially when you look at some of the large departments with hundreds of officers.

    As for the size of the vehicle, that's ALWAYS an issue when you're talking about stuffing prisoners in the back seat. Especially here in "obese" America..

    This stuff can be argued all day until we're blue in the face, but the fact of the matter is it all comes down to what a department really needs the vehicle to do. Some departments can certainly get by with a smaller foreign car. Some need large, powerful ones. Luckily, there's a huge variety of vehicles out there on the market to choose from.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Charger View Post
    Being a former GM employee myself, I would tend to agree that the (quasi-) American makers need to up their quality... But I disagree that departments buy the CVPIs/Chargers/Caprices/Impalas/etc for PC reasons...

    For one thing, the foreign companies offer very few, if any, RWD vehicles. The vast majority of PDs do all of their emergency driving training in RWD vehicles, and wouldn't want to pay the $ to get their entire force re-trained on a FWD setup...

    Add to that, the fact that the foreign companies simply don't offer a true "full-sized" sedan, and the sedans they do offer simply don't put out the same kind of power/performance as the domestics..

    Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against (MOST OF) the foreign car makers... But they simply don't offer anything that would be well-suited for police work... For now, at least.. If they start offering true full-sized sedans with powerful engines that are RWD in the future, we may very well start seeing more foreign PD vehicles..
    I don't think most of these considerations are really that important for the city police department now. State HP and some counties, yes. London, Hong Kong, Stockholm, Berlin and many other large city PDs do just fine without driving around in full-size vehicles.

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  • The Hussard
    replied
    the only foreign car that i can see to police work is the toyota avalon. during the 90s in quebec a lot of PD had volvo police car

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  • Charger
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Hate to say it, but I don't think an American manufacturer can even still today compete in terms of longevity, quality with the Hondas, Toyotas, Subarus, Nissans and if police departments didn't more or less "have" to buy American to be "politically correct", I doubt you'd see nearly as many Caprices or Crown Vics running around.
    Being a former GM employee myself, I would tend to agree that the (quasi-) American makers need to up their quality... But I disagree that departments buy the CVPIs/Chargers/Caprices/Impalas/etc for PC reasons...

    For one thing, the foreign companies offer very few, if any, RWD vehicles. The vast majority of PDs do all of their emergency driving training in RWD vehicles, and wouldn't want to pay the $ to get their entire force re-trained on a FWD setup...

    Add to that, the fact that the foreign companies simply don't offer a true "full-sized" sedan, and the sedans they do offer simply don't put out the same kind of power/performance as the domestics..

    Don't get me wrong, I have nothing against (MOST OF) the foreign car makers... But they simply don't offer anything that would be well-suited for police work... For now, at least.. If they start offering true full-sized sedans with powerful engines that are RWD in the future, we may very well start seeing more foreign PD vehicles..

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    You might also look at the Honda Element. Tons of room, AWD, completely "washable" interior, very decent mileage, etc. Look something like junior hummers and present a very decent appearance when decked out with light bar & spots. Ride might be a bit stiff for roads with jillions of pot-holes, though.

    The Honda Ridgeline and CR-V are also good alternatives and I once saw a very mean-looking Accord decked out with the goodies, painted blue/white...and it was FAST!

    Hate to say it, but I don't think an American manufacturer can even still today compete in terms of longevity, quality with the Hondas, Toyotas, Subarus, Nissans and if police departments didn't more or less "have" to buy American to be "politically correct", I doubt you'd see nearly as many Caprices or Crown Vics running around.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 07-13-2007, 09:21 PM.

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  • BoyInBlue
    replied
    Nothing beats an H2

    Last edited by BoyInBlue; 07-13-2007, 07:11 PM.

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  • kingsman
    replied
    MAybe the Subarus are great, but I would like to see you buy american.

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  • Hank1
    replied
    Our Agency uses late model Chevy Impalas and Ford Crown Victorias for normal street patrols. However, for our HAZOPS teams, we utilize Ford Expeditions and Ford F350 kingcab trucks. Here in Florida though, we don't have much use for 4x4 units.

    Be safe,

    Hank

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  • Andy Taylor
    replied
    The Subaru is a good idea. Personnally I would look at the Jeep Liberty, Patriot, or Cherokee. I just don't like the looks of the Compass.
    Last edited by Andy Taylor; 07-13-2007, 01:16 PM.

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  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    I'm with Mike on this one.

    Little story for ya. Where I lived and worked in Alaska, we had a few fleets of taxicabs running around town. One company exclusively had Subarus, one had a mix of Subs and Honda CRVs, and one had a few Honda CRVs and a Toyota Rav-4.

    When winter came on, only the Subarus ran. Period. The Hondas and Toys just did not have the stuff to run 24/7 in -60* weather. At the PD, when it got really cold (-30 and colder), we let the Ford Expeditions we ran idle 24/7, forgoeing the block heater as it just wasn't powerful enough. I watched a cabbie unplug his iced over Forester at -50*, start it up, scrape off the windows and roll away for a fare.

    Most of the Subarus had come from Anchorage or Fairbanks and had been bought used. Most had over 200k on the clock and ran stronger than our Fords.

    And oh yeah, did I mention we had NO paved roads? I would put the Forester and Outback up against any other car there and they'd win, hands down.

    1998 Subaru Forester at -58*:

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  • Michael Ledgerwood
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002 View Post
    My only problem with the Subaru, and any other import economy car, is the wear & tear and maintenance. The initial cost may be cheaper, but they are not meant to run at idle for extended periods of time. They won't be very forgiving to the numerous driving styles they may endure from multiple officers. What might be a simple repair on a typical LE fleet vehicle (Crown Vic, Impala, etc.) could be a costly and very time consuming repair on an economy import.

    Uh What??? Subaru's have a much higher reliability rate than any of our current american police fleet. Subaru's are one of the most common cars used for patrol duty in Europe. Several American jurisdicitions, especially those high up in the mountains, use Subaru's due to their great incliment weather handling. Both the Outback and Forester are known for their reliability. Granted while they might be expensive to repair they will last far longer than a Crown Vic. I know several people that drive Subaru's and some of them have well over 200,000 miles without needing any more than a tune up. The Imports are far better than any domestic car. Why do you think the big 3 auto makers are struggling so bad. The Subaru is definately worth a look.

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  • The Hussard
    replied
    Ford Explorer maybe also a good choice a little bit smaller than the tahoe

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  • Charger
    replied
    Taurus' are bad for patrol work in ANY conditions. (We have 5, currently decommissioning and getting rid of them) They've been absolute terrors to maintain. Talk about not being able to handle the wear & tear! LOL

    On one hand, Davis brings up a good point about the durability of the foreign cars. They're not notorious for being able to handle all the hard duties that the typical patrol cars go through. I CAN say though, their quality has definitely improved over the years. The rest of our fleet is Hyundai Sonatas & Santa Fes... They don't have as many miles on them (yet) as the Taurus' do, but so far they've actually held up BETTER to all the abuse... So much for Ford quality, eh?

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  • The Hussard
    replied
    my boss will not buy a non-4x4 right now we have a ford taurus station wagon and it a really piece of sh**** with the type of work we do

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  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
    Subarus are awesome in the snow and get much better mileage than some of the other vehicles out there. A decked out Tahoe would be very nice but most security departments I know of do things on the cheap.
    My only problem with the Subaru, and any other import economy car, is the wear & tear and maintenance. The initial cost may be cheaper, but they are not meant to run at idle for extended periods of time. They won't be very forgiving to the numerous driving styles they may endure from multiple officers. What might be a simple repair on a typical LE fleet vehicle (Crown Vic, Impala, etc.) could be a costly and very time consuming repair on an economy import.

    Leave a comment:

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