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  • Question about Florida licenses

    I am new to the job market here in Florida. I am new to the state, and I am planning to apply for a Concealed Weapons Permit soon. I was wondering if anyone can tell me about what types of licenses are required to do security work in Florida..i.e.(carrying a concealed firearm, or at least having one available for use while on duty)..I understand that there may be training involved..I have been out of the loop so to speak..for about twenty or so years. I'm not sure if you have to be licensed here to even work security.

    I have a bad knee, and I am in my late 40's.. I'm just a vet w/prior military LE experience that is looking for a night job..I worked security in the past w/NO weapon.. I will never do that again..I am unable to really do some of the physical stuff, like running, etc..(due to a bad knee)..any comments would be greatly appreciated. I am large in stature/weight that may be well suited for blocking the door, and that's about it..lol..

  • #2
    I can tell you that to work unarmed security you have to have a Class D license. I believe that it starts out with a 20 hour course, followed by a refresher course within two years, but I forget the length of it.

    To worked armed security you have to have a Class G license.

    There are others here who have more experience in Florida than I do so I will let them fill in blanks.
    Last edited by Chimpie; 06-19-2007, 03:07 PM. Reason: Cause I type too fast.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by juking View Post
      I am large in stature/weight that may be well suited for blocking the door, and that's about it..lol..
      *sigh* I'm not even going to bother with this one.

      Comment


      • #4
        Class D Unarmed Security Officer License= 40 hours. You may take a 24 hour course get your license then before you renew your license (2 years) you must take the remaining 16 hours.

        Class G Statewide Firearms License (armed officer) = 28 hour class.


        You have no need for a CCW in Security. The only time you can carry concealed is for special details usually not lasting more than a day or two. And then you are covered under your G license.

        If you don't feel like taking off your duty belt to drive to and from work get a CCW and throw a jacket over your uniform shirt and weapon

        Comment


        • #5
          A Citizen Concealed Weapon permit is not valid for a security officer (regardless of their title) while performing security duties. A Class D licensee may not have access to a firearm (this means keeping one in your car with the keys in your possession!) while on duty unless they are both a Class G licensee (statewide firearms permit) and the post authorizes the arming of the employee(s) with a firearm.

          Basically, your CCW is useless while you're on duty.

          You must have a 28 hour course, called a Class D course, before applying to a security company. Security companies cannot take applications of non-licensed employees. The cost is posted on the state website, which Google will find by searching for: Florida Division of Licensing.

          You must be trained at a DS licensed facility, which can be a Junior College, or a private business. They are authorized to give you the 40 hours of training for the D course (28 and 16 hour courses), as well as a Class G (Firearms) course.

          Do not bother taking the Class G course (Firearms) unless you have an employer willing to sign your application. Without the Manager of a licensed security company signing your application, your application is invalid.
          Some Kind of Commando Leader

          "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by GCMC Security View Post
            Class D Unarmed Security Officer License= 40 hours. You may take a 24 hour course get your license then before you renew your license (2 years) you must take the remaining 16 hours.

            Class G Statewide Firearms License (armed officer) = 28 hour class.


            You have no need for a CCW in Security. The only time you can carry concealed is for special details usually not lasting more than a day or two. And then you are covered under your G license.

            If you don't feel like taking off your duty belt to drive to and from work get a CCW and throw a jacket over your uniform shirt and weapon
            IMPORTANT NOTICE

            DATE: October 2, 2006

            TO: Class “B” Security Agencies and Class “BB” Security Agency Branch Offices
            Class “DS” Training Schools and Facilities

            FROM: W. H. “Buddy” Bevis, Director, Division of Licensing


            SUBJECT: Revised Requirements for Submitting Proof of 16 Hours' Training

            As you know, for many years, individuals applying for a Class “D” Security Officer license could
            submit an application for licensure after having completed only 24 hours of the 40 hours of total
            training required for licensure. The licensee could then submit proof of completion of the
            remaining 16 hours of training when the license was scheduled for renewal in two years. During
            its last session, the Legislature passed House Bill 7239, a bill that revises the timetable for
            submitting proof of the 16 hours of training.
            Effective January 1, 2007, an applicant for the Class “D” license can still submit an application
            for licensure after having completed only 24 hours of training but will no longer have the option
            of waiting until first renewal to submit documentation of completing the remaining training.
            Instead, the applicant will have to submit proof of having successfully completed the 16 hours of
            supplemental training within 180 days of the date on which the initial application was submitted.
            If documentation of completion of the 16 hours of training is not submitted within the 180 days,
            the individual’s license will be automatically suspended until proof of the required training has
            been submitted to the Division.
            Although this change will not require anyone who is licensed before January 1, 2007, to
            complete additional training hours in order to renew an active license, if there is an initial
            application pending and the license has not been issued by January 1, 2007, the applicant must
            submit proof of having successfully completed the 16 hours of supplemental training by June
            30, 2007.
            If you have any questions about the revised requirements for submitting proof of completion of
            the 16 hours of supplemental training, please call one of the service representatives in our
            Public Inquiry Section at 850-245-5665 or telephone the Regional Office nearest you.
            Last edited by bigdog; 06-20-2007, 12:40 AM.
            "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by bigdog View Post
              IMPORTANT NOTICE

              DATE: October 2, 2006

              TO: Class “B” Security Agencies and Class “BB” Security Agency Branch Offices
              Class “DS” Training Schools and Facilities

              FROM: W. H. “Buddy” Bevis, Director, Division of Licensing


              SUBJECT: Revised Requirements for Submitting Proof of 16 Hours' Training

              As you know, for many years, individuals applying for a Class “D” Security Officer license could
              submit an application for licensure after having completed only 24 hours of the 40 hours of total
              training required for licensure. The licensee could then submit proof of completion of the
              remaining 16 hours of training when the license was scheduled for renewal in two years. During
              its last session, the Legislature passed House Bill 7239, a bill that revises the timetable for
              submitting proof of the 16 hours of training.
              Effective January 1, 2007, an applicant for the Class “D” license can still submit an application
              for licensure after having completed only 24 hours of training but will no longer have the option
              of waiting until first renewal to submit documentation of completing the remaining training.
              Instead, the applicant will have to submit proof of having successfully completed the 16 hours of
              supplemental training within 180 days of the date on which the initial application was submitted.
              If documentation of completion of the 16 hours of training is not submitted within the 180 days,
              the individual’s license will be automatically suspended until proof of the required training has
              been submitted to the Division.
              Although this change will not require anyone who is licensed before January 1, 2007, to
              complete additional training hours in order to renew an active license, if there is an initial
              application pending and the license has not been issued by January 1, 2007, the applicant must
              submit proof of having successfully completed the 16 hours of supplemental training by June
              30, 2007.
              If you have any questions about the revised requirements for submitting proof of completion of
              the 16 hours of supplemental training, please call one of the service representatives in our
              Public Inquiry Section at 850-245-5665 or telephone the Regional Office nearest you.
              Oh very interesting. Thank you

              Comment


              • #8
                >>>>SNIP<<<<<
                the Legislature passed House Bill 7239, a bill that revises the timetable for
                submitting proof of the 16 hours of training.

                >>>>SNIP<<<<<

                As I understood it (years ago), the additional 16 hours were intended to be a refresher of the initial 24 hours training. So now you sit for and additional 16 hours, only sooner than previously required, to see the same (30 year old) films, read the same book and hear the same instructions you just sat thru?

                This "40" hours seems to be a magic number someone simply plucked from the sky. There is only so much a "D" student needs to know and 24 hours is adequate to disseminate the information.

                GEEZE. Time for more letter writing.

                O.K. Off the soap box. Your turn NA (LOL).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Here's the syllabus of the 40 hour florida security officer course,

                  Course A (24 hours)
                  Chapter 493, Florida Statutes and 1.5 hrs.
                  Chapter 5N-1, Florida Administrative Code
                  • Legislative Intent, s. 493.6100
                  • Definitions, s. 493.6101(1),(2),(3),(7),(8),(9),(13),(14),(18),(19 ),(23)
                  • Inapplicability, s. 493.6102(1)
                  • Initial Application For License, s. 493.6105
                  • License Requirements, ss. 493.6106 and 493.6303
                  • Investigation of Applicants by Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,
                  s. 493.6108
                  • License; Contents; Identification Card, s. 493.6111
                  • Renewal Application For Licensure, s. 493.6113
                  • Cancellation or Inactivation of License, s. 493.6114
                  • Weapons and Firearms, s. 493.6115
                  • Grounds for Disciplinary Action, s. 493.6118(1)(a)-(t), (2),(6)
                  • Violations; Penalties, s. 493.6120
                  • Use of State Seal, s. 493.6124
                  • Classes of License, s. 493.6301
                  • Uniforms; Required Wear; Exceptions, s. 493.6305
                  • Vehicles Used By Security Agencies; Lights, s. 316.2397
                  • Unlawful Symbols of Authority, ss. 843.085 and 493.6118(1)(i)
                  • Complaints, 5N-1.100(4)
                  • Probable Cause Determination, 5N-1.100(4)
                  • Disciplinary Guidelines, 5N-1.113
                  • Filing Application, 5N-1.120
                  • License Issuance; Transferability, 5N-1.120(1)
                  • Operation of Licenses, 5N-1.124(1)
                  • Licensed Firearms Instructors, 5N-1.134
                  • Ammunition, 5N-1.129
                  • Fees, 5N-1.116(3)
                  • Fingerprint Fee, 5N-1.116(3)
                  • Schools or Training Facilities, 5N-1.134
                  • School License, 5N-1.134(2)
                  • School Staff; Licensing Requirements; Standards, 5N-1.138
                  • School Curriculum; Examination, 5N-1.140
                  Legal Issues; Liability 2.5 hrs.
                  • Florida criminal laws relative to common crimes, such as theft,
                  assault, battery, robbery, and burglary
                  • Limitations of arrest authority (citizen arrest; retail theft)
                  • Legal use of force and Chapter 776, Florida Statutes
                  • Response to crimes in progress
                  • Guidelines for when a client requests a search
                  Basic Emergency First Aid 2.0 hrs.
                  • Provide the student with the basics of first aid techniques so that
                  he will be able to service a victim's needs until professional
                  assistance arrives
                  • Basic first aid instructions on various injuries, wounds and shock;
                  emergency response requirements
                  • Provide information about the Florida Good Samaritan Act
                  • Orientation to blood borne pathogens
                  Emergency Procedures 2.0 hrs.
                  • Fire and bomb threat evacuations
                  • Riot and protest preparation
                  • Natural disaster preparation and responses (hurricane and floods)
                  • Major electrical failure
                  Ethics and Professional Conduct 2.0 hrs.
                  • Describe what professional conduct is for a security officer
                  • Code of Conduct or Code of Ethics (defined)
                  • Uniform and personal grooming
                  • Effective assertiveness
                  • Discipline
                  • Readiness: Shift work and sleep adjustment
                  • Alertness
                  • Honesty
                  • Developing rapport with management, employees and guest
                  Patrol Techniques 2.0 hrs.
                  • Define patrolling
                  • Purposes for patrol
                  • Types of patrols
                  • Identify required equipment for a security officer
                  • Mobile patrol and vehicle safety (defensive driving techniques)
                  • Preventative patrols and fire watches
                  • Fixed post duties and vehicle control
                  Observation Techniques and Report Writing 3.0 hrs.
                  • Observation techniques
                  • Field note-taking, prerequisite to good reporting
                  • Report elements: the five interrogatives (who, what, when, where,
                  and how) defined
                  • Characteristics of a good report (clear, neat, complete, brief,
                  accurate, prompt)
                  • Procedure (outline, draft, final product)
                  • Importance of proofreading
                  • Sample reports common to the security industry
                  • Punctuation and capitalization
                  • Grammar guidance
                  Interviewing Techniques 1.0 hr.
                  • Explain what an interview is
                  • Explain the styles of interviewing
                  • Provide an understanding of how to develop rapport with the victim,
                  witness, or suspect
                  • Explain how to motivate the person being interviewed
                  • The interview approach
                  • Explain how to end an interview
                  Fire Detection, Suppression and Life Safety 2.0 hrs.
                  • Mission of the security officer regarding fires
                  • Definition of fire, highlighting the necessary ingredients
                  • Responsibilities of security officer regarding:
                  - Fire prevention
                  - Safeguarding of others
                  - Fire extinguishing
                  - Salvage work
                  • Procedures for controlling small fires
                  • Fire extinguishing methods (cooling, smothering, starving)
                  • Use of extinguishing agents:
                  - List of extinguishing agents
                  - Identification of extinguishers and relative markings
                  • Sodium fires
                  • Acids
                  • Life safety issues, such as:
                  - Fire fighting equipment not previously identified
                  - Life safety plans
                  - Fire detection, location and intensity
                  - Evacuation
                  • Explain s. 877.15, Florida Statutes, failure to control or report a
                  dangerous fire
                  Crime and Accident Prevention Techniques and Practices 2.0 hrs.
                  • Methods of prevention (thefts by use of lock, inspection or
                  alarm technology)
                  • Methods of prevention (injury, eliminating hazards and reporting)
                  • Methods of prevention. Securing company equipment, property and
                  reporting deficiencies
                  Crime and Accident Scene Protection 1.0 hr.
                  • Definition of a crime/accident scene
                  • Value of crime/accident scene integrity (to investigators, etc.)
                  • Duties of the first security officer on the scene:
                  - Determines what makes up the crime/accident scene
                  - Isolating and protecting the crime/accident scene
                  • Methods to protect the crime/accident scene
                  • Evidence preservation
                  • Contamination of evidence
                  • Chain of custody
                  • Identifying witnesses
                  Terrorism Awareness 2.0 hrs.
                  • Definition and history of terrorism
                  • National Threat Levels
                  • Types of terrorist attacks
                  • Role of Security Officer
                  • Recognition and response to potential terrorist activities
                  Examination 1.0 hr.
                  Note: Additional subject material may be added, but core topics
                  and subtopics must be stressed.
                  Total 24.0 hrs.
                  Course B (16 hours)
                  Public Relations 2.0 hrs.
                  • Private security/law enforcement relations
                  • Firefighter and EMT interaction
                  • Relations with the media
                  • Community relations
                  • Courtesy and etiquette issues
                  Courtroom Procedures 1.0 hr.
                  • Explain the security officer's role as a witness in both criminal
                  and civil court
                  • Explain the roles of the judge, prosecutor, defense attorney and jury
                  • Explain the security officer's rights as a victim/witness
                  • Identify the types of questions a witness may be asked
                  • Use of reference records
                  - Value of good notes and reports
                  - Use of security records in court
                  • Explain subpoena, deposition and pretrial hearing
                  - Who is required to attend
                  - Discussing the case, do's and don'ts
                  • Courtroom testimony issues
                  - Preparation
                  - Giving testimony
                  • Courtroom demeanor
                  Fundamentals of Personal Security 2.0 hrs.
                  • Explain the proper use of cognitive and affective skills - calmness,
                  courtesy, patience, and self-control
                  • Provide an awareness of the types of weapons which might be used
                  against a security officer - batons, chemical weapons, knives, guns, etc.
                  • Responding to violent crimes
                  • Defusing hostility
                  • Evasive tactics
                  • Weapon safety awareness
                  • Insight as to legal problems encountered by a security officer
                  firing weapons on the job
                  • Review the security officer's use of weapons as outlined in
                  Chapter 493, Florida Statutes
                  • Explain the steps to be followed when responding to a potentially
                  violent situation
                  Interpersonal Communications 2.0 hrs.
                  • Perception factors - appearance, body language, tone of voice
                  • Clarifying verbal and written communication (speaking well)
                  • Demonstrate professional communication
                  • Identify the effects of threats or challenges which
                  are directed toward the security officer
                  • Identify the effects of threats or challenges that are directed
                  toward a citizen by the security officer
                  Professional Communications 1.0 hr.
                  • Two-way radio use and procedures
                  • Telephone etiquette
                  • Other professional communication techniques
                  Traffic Direction 1.0 hr.
                  • General responsibilities of traffic controllers
                  • Areas where security officers may direct traffic
                  • Position and posture in directing traffic
                  • Identify practical hand signals
                  • Identify safety equipment
                  • Use of the whistle
                  • Use of the flashlight
                  • Use of traffic cones and flares
                  Crowd Control 1.0 hr.
                  • Types of crowds (peaceful, hostile, demonstration, etc.)
                  • Characteristics of crowds
                  • Identify methods for directing flow of crowd traffic
                  • Teamwork among security officers in crowd control situations
                  • Crowd control techniques
                  - Interaction procedures
                  - Effective assertiveness
                  - Issuing directives
                  - Eliciting cooperation
                  • Effective security officer behavior in crowd control situations
                  Special Problems for Security 4.0 hrs.
                  • Fundamentals of understanding unique behavior
                  - Dealing with disabilities
                  - Emotionally distressed
                  - Elderly
                  - Juveniles
                  - Street people (trespassers)
                  • Controlled substances
                  - Identification and recognition
                  - Dealing with people under the influence
                  • OSHA first responders duties (such as hazardous materials)
                  - How to read and understand labels
                  - Responding to hazardous materials incidents
                  • Violence in the workplace
                  - History and scope of the problem
                  - Awareness of potential violence
                  - Security actions to prevent workplace violence
                  - Physical security measures
                  - Detection of abnormalities
                  - Reporting incidents
                  - Responding to violent behavior
                  - Role of crisis management and trauma teams
                  (security officer's role in providing assistance)
                  Terrorism Awareness 1.0 hr.
                  • Definition and history of terrorism
                  • National Threat Levels
                  • Types of terrorist attacks
                  • Role of Security Officer
                  • Recognition and response to potential terrorist activities
                  Examination 1.0 hr.
                  Note: Additional subject material may be added, but core topics
                  and subtopics must be stressed.
                  Total 16
                  "Get yourself a shovel cause your in deep Sh*t"

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    [QUOTE=bigdog;32727]Here's the syllabus of the 40 hour florida security officer course,

                    Thanks BD. Appears there have been some changes since the last boring 16 hour class I sat thru.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Sounds like Florida accually teaches some useful stuff. I wish CA's 40 hours had more useful information.
                      "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Looks good on paper, doesn't it?

                        Here's the reality:

                        The training syllabus you see? That's all your "DI" licensed instructor gets. No other training materials are provided, and its up to the instructor to flesh out that syllabus.

                        Which means that for "first aid," all they have to do (and one school does this) is go over the basics of first aid without talking about CPR, then go, "If you are required to perform first aid, tell your company that we provide a real first aid course for $59.95 per student."

                        I had always thought that was hilarious. It says "provide first aid till professional help arrives," and the training materials were: CALL 911.

                        Other things like that abound. Being told what ABC means for fire extinguishers, but never actually seeing a fire extinguisher, let alone seeing the kick that one gives when a commercial 10 pound is deployed.

                        As Jerry MacCauley said: "I didn't bother renewing my DI license when they told me that the 4 hours of anti-terrorism training would be 'whatever I thought best.'"

                        And I agree with him. Its all paper, and most security "schools," (They're businesses, not schools, usually owned by security companies) are teaching a rehash of "observe and report" for their anti-terrorism block, without actually addressing threats of terrorism, etc. Why? Because they have no earthly idea what to teach!
                        Some Kind of Commando Leader

                        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                        Comment

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