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  • Homeless

    I also have a lot of homeless in the area I work. Why I havent found any inside yet I have no idea. Its a nice air conditioned building with lots of places to hide including a whole unoccupied sixth floor I was told not to patrol (but i do anyway). So far they just stop for a few minutes and move on (don't know, maybe my stern glance gets em) but I"m sure I'll have problems down the line. I haven't been at this site long.

    So, any tips and techniques you like for dealing with the homeless?

  • #2
    You need to reference your post orders and understand how they apply to specific events as they develop. Homeless or not, follow your post orders. If your working under competent management they will already have thought this out and designed your post orders (at least in part) around the issue.

    Be meticulous though concise in your log and should homeless behavior trend towards a situation that compromises the security of specific areas/times that YOU are responsible for, than this should be noticed by management and dealt with in a productive way.
    formerly C&A

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    • #3
      Stay off the 6th floor.
      Anything that hits the fan,
      Will not be evenly distributed.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by craig333 View Post
        I also have a lot of homeless in the area I work. Why I havent found any inside yet I have no idea. Its a nice air conditioned building with lots of places to hide including a whole unoccupied sixth floor I was told not to patrol (but i do anyway). So far they just stop for a few minutes and move on (don't know, maybe my stern glance gets em) but I"m sure I'll have problems down the line. I haven't been at this site long.

        So, any tips and techniques you like for dealing with the homeless?
        You patrol where your told 'not to patrol'?

        Homeless poeple are still people. What does a homeless person look like? I see no reason to differentiate folks because of what they 'seem or may look to be'.

        Yes. I have a tip. Treat all people you meet the same. Don't be looking for social status traits to use in a judgemental scale.

        I apologize if I am incorrect, but, you seem to have some fear/distrust of "homeless people" or you await the opportunity to confront one of them for an opportunity to display your superiority.

        "Steet People" and "Homeless People" ain't stupid. Some are down on thier luck and some choose the way of life. They will have you figured out in two seconds. And word does get around.

        Technique; Treating "them" with kindness and respect goes a long way and gains the respect of "these folks", which may come in real handy one day should you need thier assistance. "Hey. How ya doin' buddy? You O.K.?" gets around just as quickly as, "I'm the Security Guard and you gotta get outta my building."

        "Hi. Pretty hot out there ain't it? Listen, you sit here a few minutes until you feel better. But don't get me fired. O.K.? I got kids to take care of."

        In what we refer to as 'homeless areas' there is a hiarchy amongst these folks. Once you befriend or show respect to a few, the word will get around that you are a good guy and not to be messed with. This is not to say be lax in your assignment. You must enforce your post orders and show limits but do it respectfully.

        You'll do alright. Just be aware and show respect.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mh892 View Post
          You patrol where your told 'not to patrol'?

          Homeless poeple are still people. What does a homeless person look like? I see no reason to differentiate folks because of what they 'seem or may look to be'.

          Yes. I have a tip. Treat all people you meet the same. Don't be looking for social status traits to use in a judgemental scale.

          I apologize if I am incorrect, but, you seem to have some fear/distrust of "homeless people" or you await the opportunity to confront one of them for an opportunity to display your superiority.

          "Steet People" and "Homeless People" ain't stupid. Some are down on thier luck and some choose the way of life. They will have you figured out in two seconds. And word does get around.

          Technique; Treating "them" with kindness and respect goes a long way and gains the respect of "these folks", which may come in real handy one day should you need thier assistance. "Hey. How ya doin' buddy? You O.K.?" gets around just as quickly as, "I'm the Security Guard and you gotta get outta my building."

          "Hi. Pretty hot out there ain't it? Listen, you sit here a few minutes until you feel better. But don't get me fired. O.K.? I got kids to take care of."

          In what we refer to as 'homeless areas' there is a hiarchy amongst these folks. Once you befriend or show respect to a few, the word will get around that you are a good guy and not to be messed with. This is not to say be lax in your assignment. You must enforce your post orders and show limits but do it respectfully.

          You'll do alright. Just be aware and show respect.
          Most of this, I couldn't agree with more. You answered his question big time. Having a reputation of being decent and fair will go a very very long way towards keeping the situation from going in a bad direction.

          True for anyone you deal with as an S/O. Unless there is an emergency situation taking place, the first thing I say to anyone (even trespassers) that I come across is, "Hello, is everything ok? Is there anything I can help you with?" The response to these opening lines tells me allot I need to know about who is there, what their general intent is, and what I need to do to make/keep things right.

          My experience is that almost anyone you come into contact with on the job lives in the area or is in the area frequently. God forbid, but if your getting your head stomped on by a couple of crackheads at 3 in the morning, you don't want the neighbors and passersby to think, "Oh that ignorant security guard probably mouthed off to the wrong people," you want them thinking, "Thats a pretty decent guy over there getting hurt, I better et some help quick!".
          formerly C&A

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by mh892 View Post
            "Hi. Pretty hot out there ain't it? Listen, you sit here a few minutes until you feel better..."
            God please don't say this. This is what a push-over says. If you introduce yourself with a comment like this the battle is already lost.

            Realise there are two types of homeless people out there:

            1.) Poor people - down on their luck, in a bad financial situation
            2.) Drug addicts / mental cases - out of their minds, dangerous

            Always show respect and 100% humanity to people, no matter how they look... but homeless that are out of their minds can be very dangerous so watch out.
            Police Officer

            Experience: Bouncer, EMT, Theme Park Security, Money Transport, Armed Guard

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by dannyr619 View Post
              God please don't say this. This is what a push-over says. If you introduce yourself with a comment like this the battle is already lost.

              Realise there are two types of homeless people out there:

              1.) Poor people - down on their luck, in a bad financial situation
              2.) Drug addicts / mental cases - out of their minds, dangerous

              Always show respect and 100% humanity to people, no matter how they look... but homeless that are out of their minds can be very dangerous so watch out.

              Thank you Danny.

              Yes be kind and respectful, but don't look like a pushover. Be clear about the boundries and rules, but do it with respect.

              "Hi, Good afternoon. I know it is hot outside, but you can't stay here. Loaves & Fishes is just up the street." Of course be sure that they don't need medical attention, especially in this heat we've had this week. If you think they might, then get it. It is better for them to refuse treatment to the medics than to you. You covered your a$$ by calling. We do not need a repeat of last summer.
              "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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              • #8
                On hot nights I'll let a few of the people on our campus come in and get a drink of water. If they ask if the cafe is still open, I ask them if they have money. If they do I might let them come in and get something to eat. I have been burnt by it once and ended up having to cuff up the guy I was trying to be nice to. Kinda sucked but he got an ear full from me.

                You will learn who your regulars are. You will learn who will take your charity and leave, and who will take the mile with that inch you gave. I always preface my actions when I do this by saying, "Don't take my kindness as weakness"
                "You gotta look like Rico Suave, Think like Einstein and, only if that fails...fight like Tyson." -Dougo83's FTO

                Me- "Should we call the police?" My FTO- "Justin, here, we are the police. Go get em."

                Originally posted by Black Caesar
                some people just need killin!!!!! (Or Tasing, or pepper spraying or whatever).

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by craig333 View Post
                  I also have a lot of homeless in the area I work. Why I havent found any inside yet I have no idea. Its a nice air conditioned building with lots of places to hide including a whole unoccupied sixth floor I was told not to patrol (but i do anyway). So far they just stop for a few minutes and move on (don't know, maybe my stern glance gets em) but I"m sure I'll have problems down the line. I haven't been at this site long.

                  So, any tips and techniques you like for dealing with the homeless?
                  Craig, I worked uniformed contract security for a while myself. Contrary to what others here thought, I understood your comment concerning the unoccupied sixth floor to be that you were told you didn't need to patrol it because it's unoccupied. I'm guessing that whoever was assigned to train you gave you that information. Am I right?

                  Now, if you were ordered to stay out, that's one thing. But if a lazy FTO told you it doesn't need to be patrolled ("no one ever goes there anyways"), I'm sure you're doing the right thing.

                  Secondly, as far as homeless are concerned, I worked downtown high rise buildings where I contacted many homeless people in the area during graveyard shifts. The client did not want people, homeless or not, sleeping on the property. In addition to vagrancy, homeless people often littered in the area and urinated publicy on the building and grounds.

                  There's no reason to approach a homeless person any differently than a trespasser. I would approach, keep a respectful distance, and call out, "Sir" or "Ma'am" to wake them up. I would then inform them I was a security officer with "X company" that owned the property. Regretfully, they did not want anyone sleeping on the property and it was considered trespassing.

                  I never had any problems with this approach. Most people woke up, apologized and said they didn't know they couldn't sleep there, and would move on without any problems. I'd engage in some friendly small talk and they'd be on their way. Several were very "out of it" due to substance abuse and would need some further verbal prodding to keep them awake.

                  As a side note, I was trained to document any contacts with trespassers and allow them one warning. If I contacted them again in the future, I was told to call the police due to the violation of a trespass after warning.

                  In addition, I suppose if you can educate yourself about any programs for the homeless or shelters in your area, you'd have some additional tools at your disposal by being able to refer people to them. In those cases, you could tell them, "I'm sorry, you can't sleep here, but you can head down the street to 'X shelter' and they have hot meals for free."

                  Good luck!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    All of you have provided meaningful input. I'd like to put this out for your consideration. Street people are a treasure trove of very useful intelligence. A kind word, a cup of water or hot coffee or hot breakfast not only mark you as a decent human being but in the world of security gaining valuable insight into the real happenings in a particular environment.
                    When you get this information use it wisely, don't burn sources and make sure it gets to the right authority as soon as possible. You can help bust theft rings, drug dealings, prostitution rings, discover bad cops and security officers and have corrupt building owners and managers prosecuted. The list goes on and on.
                    Enjoy the day,
                    Bill

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                    • #11
                      Bill you're exactly correct! When I worked plainclothes LE I had very strong ties to the homeless. I also went into the jail and had breakfast or lunch with the inmates, many of which I helped place there. I received a wealth of information which helped me solve many felony crimes. Officers would ask me why I was so successful. My only reply would be - treat people like humans.
                      Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                      Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                      Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

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                      • #12
                        You guys are right.

                        Some of them are only homeless looking for a place to sleep.I approach them with respect even if they insult me BUT...some of them are under alchool and/or drugs influence.Then the situation could easily get dangerous.For example a situation that happened recently in a ATM bank local.The homeless was under HEAVY drugs.Me and another agent approach him and tell the control we are about to proceed on an expulsion so he can keep an eye on us with the cameras.

                        The guy slowly wokes up but he seemed dizzy.He grabbed a sharpened screwdriver from under his sleeping bag and tried to stab me in the leg.I moved quiclky backward and got my nightstick out.The noise calmed him down and he dropped his screwdriver.He then left calmly.

                        I mean those guys are used to get throw out of buildings by security but never underestimate them because they are sleeping homeless.Some of them know the drills and could take advantage of the situation where you are alone.Just watch your six at all times and never take an elevetor with them.
                        Ain't war hell?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by War113 View Post
                          You guys are right.

                          Some of them are only homeless looking for a place to sleep.I approach them with respect even if they insult me BUT...some of them are under alchool and/or drugs influence.Then the situation could easily get dangerous.For example a situation that happened recently in a ATM bank local.The homeless was under HEAVY drugs.Me and another agent approach him and tell the control we are about to proceed on an expulsion so he can keep an eye on us with the cameras.

                          The guy slowly wokes up but he seemed dizzy.He grabbed a sharpened screwdriver from under his sleeping bag and tried to stab me in the leg.I moved quiclky backward and got my nightstick out.The noise calmed him down and he dropped his screwdriver.He then left calmly.

                          I mean those guys are used to get throw out of buildings by security but never underestimate them because they are sleeping homeless.Some of them know the drills and could take advantage of the situation where you are alone.Just watch your six at all times and never take an elevetor with them.
                          Very true. One of my fellow bouncers was almost stabbed by a homeless guy just walking by... luckily he had just gotten back from a Close Protection Academy and disarmed him quickly.
                          Police Officer

                          Experience: Bouncer, EMT, Theme Park Security, Money Transport, Armed Guard

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Ièm with Dannyr519 on this one. Montreal has a lot of street people. It gets very cold here in the winter & very hot in the summer. Some of these people do not want to go to the many shelters available. (They can't get in while under the influence & choose to stay under the influence etc).

                            We get them all the time at my downtown hotel. They panhandle the guests arriving at the hotel & sitting on the terrasse of the bar. They enter the hotel & roam the hallways looking for food left on room service trays that have been left in the hallways. Then they go & find a mechaincal room or the top of a stairway & sleep, usually urinating in the same place.

                            Our biggest prblm is with Inuit people. I learned recently that there problem with drinking is not really their fault. They are missing an enzime in their blood & their bodies can not process alcohol. This being understood I still have to take a hard line with them rather than a soft approach. With no trespass to property act in Quebec, if you just ask them to leave you can & I have spent a whole shift chasing them out of the hotel.
                            I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                            Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                            • #15
                              I treat them with as much respect as they allow me to. Treating them with some dignity goes a long way, especially if they are in a group. you don't want to create a situation where they have to act macho to save face.

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