Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Minnesota IPC Mall Guards In Big Trouble

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
    There goes the neighborhood...
    The guy that shot the Robinsdale cop the other day, yeah, he was a manager at Wolf...Supposedly he hasn't worked for them in 6 weeks. Actually, it's not the first time he stopped working for them.


    http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/myfox...Y&pageId=1.1.1

    From what I've been told, that shoot may be justified. The cop wasn't a cop to a reasonable person when he was shot, I have been informed, and only became a cop when he called in the fact he'd just taken two rounds to the legs.

    Leave a comment:


  • FireEMSPolice
    replied
    Here is a link to the article.

    Imagine that, IPC stealing. Try ordering from their "sister" company, Uniformity Inc. That in and of itself is theft at its finest.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    SecTrainer put his finger on the majority of the problems we face in security, effective leadership. We give short shrift to leadership. We are enamored with the concept of "management." We stray to our discomfort when we fail to understand things are managed and people are lead. Quality of leadership, I believe, was best defined by General John J. Pershing when he stated, "A good leader will get service from mediocre soldiers while a poor leader will demoralize the best trained soldiers."
    This is not meant to be a philosophical diatribe. Substitute the word "security officer, guard what have you" for "soldier" and you have the crux of the matter.
    A good leader knows what is going on. The best way for a leader to find out what is going on is to get off his mattress and go into the ranks and find out.
    So many supervisors, leaders, are apple polishers feckless or narcissisist or both. Thus the true mission is not achieved.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002 View Post
    I know a little bit about who was involved. The 25-year-old suspect was a supervisor, and he was basically the "leader" of all this from what I am told.
    There goes the neighborhood...
    The guy that shot the Robinsdale cop the other day, yeah, he was a manager at Wolf...Supposedly he hasn't worked for them in 6 weeks. Actually, it's not the first time he stopped working for them.


    http://www.myfoxtwincities.com/myfox...Y&pageId=1.1.1
    Last edited by sgtnewby; 06-09-2007, 09:50 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    Supervision here seems to have very clearly been MIA...or was the supervisor taking a cut, perhaps?
    I know a little bit about who was involved. The 25-year-old suspect was a supervisor, and he was basically the "leader" of all this from what I am told.
    Last edited by davis002; 06-09-2007, 08:03 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Note the comment by the VP of IPC to the effect that he was "upset" because the SO's had met their "strict hiring criteria".

    So what if they did? The issue here isn't how or why these guards were hired. The issue here is: Where was the oversight with respect to these guards after they were hired? Supervision here seems to have very clearly been MIA...or was the supervisor taking a cut, perhaps?

    Your responsibility as a company to ensure the integrity of your officers doesn't end with the fact that you performed a pre-employment background check, no matter how thorough. This must be followed up by ongoing, never-ending vigilance with respect to your officers. This is not a matter of cynical suspicion, but the simple recognition that anyone in a position of trust might yield to the unusual opportunities and temptations they have to commit crimes, let alone simply knowing that they're not shirking their duties.

    ...and not just the officers, but the supervisors must be overseen as well. When I was area security manager for an area retail chain some years ago, all store security managers underwent annual polygraphs and their criminal, credit and driving record checks were refreshed...and the area managers also! This process led to several investigations and the recovery of nearly $50,000, I believe, in one of the East Coast regions, but it was dropped a couple of years after I left due to "the expense". If oversight is "too expensive", we might well ask: How costly is an incident like this?
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 06-09-2007, 07:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christopherstjo
    replied
    Unfortuntely, whether these individuals are guility or innocent, the fact remains that it gives all of us a bad name and worse yet, while the media reports such things they tend not to report if a person is found innocent later on and thus, images such as this continue to linger on in the minds of society and officials.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    started a topic Minnesota IPC Mall Guards In Big Trouble

    Minnesota IPC Mall Guards In Big Trouble

    Rosedale mall thefts: Inside job?
    Merchandise and thousands in cash were seized by police, who accuse two guards of helping themselves after hours.

    By Joy Powell, Star Tribune

    Last update: June 08, 2007 – 10:19 PM

    It was, if the allegations are true, security guards gone wild.
    After their nightly rounds at Rosedale Center, at least two guards set to work with burglary tools and safe combinations, then sneaked off with cash, flat-screen TVs, skateboards, clothing, margarita makers and more, according to search-warrant documents filed Friday.

    Four people have been arrested in connection with the heists, which began in October at the mall in Roseville. The guards sold some of the loot or returned it to other stores for cash; the rest they stashed in an apartment they shared and also in an apartment leased by one of their girlfriends, the documents allege.

    In searches of Roseville and Minneapolis apartments and also of a car on Wednesday, police seized more than $20,000 in property.

    It's believed to have come from Williams-Sonoma, Abercrombie & Fitch, Caribou Coffee, Air Traffic, Zumiez, Verizon, Foot Locker, Rosetta Stone, World Poker Store, Bath & Body Works, and Things Remembered, according to police inventories.

    In his 23 years of law enforcement, Roseville police Lt. Lorne Rosand said, he has never seen anything quite like it. "I see it as a shocking event," Rosand said. "The people whom you should trust, obviously in this specific incident, you can't trust."

    Charges are pending, said Jack Rhodes, chief of staff for the Ramsey County attorney's office.

    He wouldn't comment further Friday evening, as the case continued to unfold.

    Roseville police arrested the four on Wednesday, interviewed them and released them from the Ramsey County Law Enforcement Center.

    Meanwhile, prosecutors are reviewing piles of evidence, which include a wafflemaker, a panini press, sunglasses, watches and framed art.

    The guards' scheme came to light May 30 after a concerned citizen called IPC International Corp., which provides shopping center security for Rosedale Center, and said two male guards were committing late-night thefts and burglaries.

    Chad Potenziani, the regional manager for Illinois-based IPC, called Roseville police. Neither he nor any other spokesman for the firm, which bills itself as a leading provider of shopping center security, would return a reporter's call Friday evening.

    Police soon learned that one of the suspects, a 20-year-old man, had been bragging of stealing from the stores and their storage rooms at the mall. The court documents say he boasted that he would often remove the hinge pins on doors, jimmy locks or scoot around security gates. The documents also say he boasted of how he sometimes joined the 25-year-old guard, who also stole on his own, in the burglaries and thefts.

    A trunk of goods

    Then on Tuesday, another concerned citizen told police that she had seen one of the guards trying to peddle Abercrombie & Fitch clothing and Bath & Body Works products out of the trunk of his car.

    Many of the items were recovered from the apartment one guard shared in Roseville with a roommate.

    And at the Minneapolis apartment of the 20-year-old suspect's girlfriend, the court papers say, were expensive cookware, a convection oven, vegetable choppers, clothing, cologne and dozens more items that had been reported stolen. Much of it was in the original boxes, or had price tags still attached.

    In the Roseville apartment, police say they found burglary tools, nearly $4,700 in cash, bank deposit bags from Abercrombie & Fitch, a sensor-tag removal device and many other items that were believed to have been stolen.

    'Upset by charges'

    "We're very concerned and upset by the charges," said Donald Lantz, senior executive vice president of IPC International. "IPC and the state of Minnesota both have strict hiring criteria in place for security officer applicants, and these individuals met this criteria."

    The guards have been suspended without pay, he said.

    "Our first priority is to provide a safe, secure environment for mall visitors and employees," Lantz said, "and our staff at Rosedale Mall is being reinforced to ensure that service continues."

    Rollin Hunsicker, mall vice president and general manager, called the case troubling. He said the investigation could potentially uncover more guards involved in such activity.

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X