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  • Omg, can it really be this bad?

    So today, third day at this site, first time locking up, I happen to notice, "hey, this one door has a electric opener (for wheelchair patients)". I check the lock, its locked. I hit the electric opener, the door opens. Well once you're inside it wouldnt be so bad would it? I mean the stairwell doors all are locked. Well yeah they are, but the elevators sure aren't. If thats not bad enough, the chain link fence to the parking garage (like thats not easy enough to cut through) has a gap almost big enough for me to crawl through. Then theres one door that has a panic type latch. Send the kid in, hit the opener, have him open the door to the outside and boom, access to the whole building. This is a medical building too. Would anyone be tempted by that? Can they really be so unconcerned about security? After hours we go home and the place is ripe for the picking. Amazing.

  • #2
    Craig, welcome to the whacky world of physical security and access control. Observe, comply with your post orders, take copious notes and keep your body and mind in good shape.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

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    • #3
      Things like that used to surprise me too.
      "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Andy Taylor View Post
        Things like that used to surprise me too.
        Yep, same here...

        We have several condo villages at my site, and each has its own recreation/activity center; These centers are the property of the Homeowner's Association (read: Interval Ownership ), and only Owner's or guests of those particular villages are entitled to use...

        One center I lock up each night has an indoor pool and an outdoor hot tub; Now mind you, there is a wrought iron fence (ok, so it's only 7' high) around the hot tub, the main entryway to the center and the door from the tub to the indoor pool requires a keypad security code for access. Green Mountain College has limited use of the building, restricted to the lower level and 2 classrooms...

        I've forgotten how many times I've written it up, left notices for the faculty, logged in my reports to the rec center manager, that literally almost every single day that I close up the center, the exterior door that the college students use to get in and out is unlocked, an there isn't a soul in the building!

        The kids come in, do their studying, go back to the dorm for the night, and leave the galldarn door unlocked all the friggin' time

        There is but one other door between the college area and the rest of the rec center, and there isn't a lock on it whatsoever...

        So, needing a security code to get in upper level doors of the rec center is mucho negated by the fact these numbnuts leave their exterior door unsecured when they head out....
        “Two wrongs don't make a right, but three rights make a left”
        "I swear to God, I'm going to pistol whip the next guy that says 'Shenanigans' "... Capt. O'Hagan, "Super Troopers"

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        • #5
          I worked the back lot at an auto mall. This is where the 30 some dealerships would store excess inventory. All new cars, left unlocked with the keys in them. Employees from the various dealerships would come and get cars all the time. Salesmen/detailers etc. So you couldn't judge by their dress whether or not they were suposed to be getting cars or not. We were not suposed to stop them or ask an questions of them because we might offend them. I used to wonder why we were even there, but as I learned more about security I realised it must be for insurance reasons.
          "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Bill Warnock View Post
            Craig, welcome to the whacky world of physical security and access control. Observe, comply with your post orders, take copious notes and keep your body and mind in good shape.
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill
            Hmmm, just what I learned in guard school. Unfortunately I don't have any post orders and the others officers told me "oh, we don't do dar's anymore".

            If it weren't that I have perfect hours to get more schooling I'd be upset.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by craig333 View Post
              Hmmm, just what I learned in guard school. Unfortunately I don't have any post orders and the others officers told me "oh, we don't do dar's anymore".

              If it weren't that I have perfect hours to get more schooling I'd be upset.
              Get you a good notebook. Preferably one of the composite book type that is hard to remove the pages. Number each page. During every shift use it as your own DAR. Put the hours of your shift, Post, Any other Officers on Duty. Document each incident that you have.

              Here at the hospital Supervisors don't do DARs. I started to do the above so I would have documentation of my activities and be able to look back as needed. Basically I have my own little book of DARs as well as another notebook I use for actual notes.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by flashlightcop509 View Post
                Yep, same here...

                We have several condo villages at my site, and each has its own recreation/activity center; These centers are the property of the Homeowner's Association (read: Interval Ownership ), and only Owner's or guests of those particular villages are entitled to use...

                One center I lock up each night has an indoor pool and an outdoor hot tub; Now mind you, there is a wrought iron fence (ok, so it's only 7' high) around the hot tub, the main entryway to the center and the door from the tub to the indoor pool requires a keypad security code for access. Green Mountain College has limited use of the building, restricted to the lower level and 2 classrooms...

                I've forgotten how many times I've written it up, left notices for the faculty, logged in my reports to the rec center manager, that literally almost every single day that I close up the center, the exterior door that the college students use to get in and out is unlocked, an there isn't a soul in the building!

                The kids come in, do their studying, go back to the dorm for the night, and leave the galldarn door unlocked all the friggin' time

                There is but one other door between the college area and the rest of the rec center, and there isn't a lock on it whatsoever...

                So, needing a security code to get in upper level doors of the rec center is mucho negated by the fact these numbnuts leave their exterior door unsecured when they head out....

                It's job security. If people didn't do things like this, they wouldn't need us!!
                I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by GCMC Security View Post
                  Get you a good notebook. Preferably one of the composite book type that is hard to remove the pages. Number each page. During every shift use it as your own DAR. Put the hours of your shift, Post, Any other Officers on Duty. Document each incident that you have.

                  Here at the hospital Supervisors don't do DARs. I started to do the above so I would have documentation of my activities and be able to look back as needed. Basically I have my own little book of DARs as well as another notebook I use for actual notes.

                  Good advice. You can never go wrong documenting stuff. On my way to office depot. Thanks for the advice.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by craig333 View Post
                    Good advice. You can never go wrong documenting stuff. On my way to office depot. Thanks for the advice.
                    Becareful in keeping such documentation - as a work product it actually belongs to your employer and if your actions are discovered, it could have adverse effects on you for not (at the barest minimum) providing your employer a copy. In some states this might be grounds for termination on a claim of concealing job related info from your employer and / or taking confidential info from your employer.

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                    • #11
                      Christopher I completely agree with you. I wouldn't understand why you would even stress yourself out with something like a DAR nothing good could ever come from that.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Cpt.Laners View Post
                        Christopher I completely agree with you. I wouldn't understand why you would even stress yourself out with something like a DAR nothing good could ever come from that.
                        I'm hoping there's sarcasm there that I don't see.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Cpt.Laners View Post
                          Christopher I completely agree with you. I wouldn't understand why you would even stress yourself out with something like a DAR nothing good could ever come from that.
                          And this means what?

                          What is abundantly clear is that while s/o's profess to know their jobs what they fail to know are the many - many employment and other laws governing their jobs on all fronts. Hence, while some may think it is no big deal to take secrete notes about what goes on during their shifts; employment law generally says it is a big deal and is grounds for immediate termination on the premise that it is stealing confidential information from their employer or concealing relevant facts from the employer about ones job duties and job activity.

                          If a person is discovered and terminated for doing so, it is likely they will lose their legal ground to claim and receive unemployment benefits and it might also alter their chances in obtaining other compensation, as well. Hence, it is most likely not a good idea to publicly broadcast that you are engaged in such actions.

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                          • #14
                            I'm sorry.....I must have forgotten the part where I said I secrete my notes from my employer.

                            Let me tell you something....DON'T YOU EVER PUT WORDS INTO MY MOUTH.

                            My employer knows about my notebook, all the way up to the Branch Manager. I have never tried to keep them from anyone. I have had my notebooks subpoenaed before and complimented on my attention to detail.

                            As shift supervisor at a major trauma hospital, I alone see anywhere from 20-40 calls for service a shift. How easy do you think it is to remember the name of someone you let into an office on a day you let 15 people into offices when administration asks you 3 weeks later? How easy do you think it is to tell a prosecutor the exact time you were first informed about an incident occurring? Or what time the infant abduction alarm went off?

                            Now I'm sorry I forgot I was talking to Super-PseudoCop. You must have some extraordinary powers of recall, I'm but mere mortal and have to write things down.


                            You are so lucky this forum has a censor on it.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Notwithstanding the fact that if you had actually read my post you would have noticed that I was giving Craig333 advice. Below is the specific statement you wrote:


                              Originally posted by GCMC Security View Post
                              Get you a good notebook. Preferably one of the composite book type that is hard to remove the pages. Number each page. During every shift use it as your own DAR. Put the hours of your shift, Post, Any other Officers on Duty. Document each incident that you have.

                              Here at the hospital Supervisors don't do DARs. I started to do the above so I would have documentation of my activities and be able to look back as needed. Basically I have my own little book of DARs as well as another notebook I use for actual notes.
                              Now, please show me where exactly where it is that you wrote you share your notes with your employer - In fact, you specifically wrote "Basically, I have my own little book of DARs as well as another notebook I use for actual notes."

                              Hence, your statement presents reasonableness to believe you are keeping a double set of books - one for your employer and one for you. Thus, it is not I who is putting words in your mouth when it is you who really should pay more attention to what you write before accusing someone of misquoting you in the first place.
                              Last edited by Christopherstjo; 06-05-2007, 02:24 AM.

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