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  • The Lord of the Keys
    replied
    As far as I know in New York State a Police Officer is a type of peace officer but a peace office is not necessaraly a Police Officer. Private Colleges are allowed to have Peace Officers with extended powers. 4 year state (SUNY) schools have full Police Officers (State University of New York Campus Police) and since 2004, two year community colleges like the one I work at can also have peace officers. Prior to that year they could only have guards.
    So at the Academy my fellow recruits include people hired by Police Departments and what are called pre-hires. These are people who have paid to take the first phase of training (not including firearms) in hopes of getting hired by a Police Department in the future. Then of course there are us campus peace officers.

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  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by sgtnewby View Post
    Here in Minnesota, the DNR (Department of Natural Resorces) cops are lisenced police and have full powers.

    Here's the job description and qualifications.

    http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/jobs/careerinfo/co.html



    Having worked in a hospital, every time I see the letter "DNR together, I think about the "Do Not Resucitate" orders some patients had (meaning don't put them on life support or interfer with their dying in any way).

    So when I saw "DNR Cops", I took me by suprise for a moment. I'm like "wow, those cops really don't want you coming back to life now do they"...

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier View Post

    Here in Wisconsin, there are DNR Wardens who are not considered LEOs, but are Peace Officers because they can enforce the traffic code and DNR rules on DNR land. (Department of Natural Resources is DNR, btw...)

    They can carry a concealed weapon because the statute says any peace officer may, but they can't go around arresting people off DNR land for murder on their state tin.
    Here in Minnesota, the DNR (Department of Natural Resorces) cops are lisenced police and have full powers.

    Here's the job description and qualifications.

    http://www.dnr.state.mn.us/jobs/careerinfo/co.html

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    The Peace Officer designation means that you can enforce one or more laws of the State of New York. When I asked several NY police officers about "what is a peace officer, and is it a law enforcement officer," I learned that it is not considered a police officer. One noted that the building inspector in some towns are given peace officer powers so that they can write ordinance violations.

    We had a problem with someone long ago, who eventually moved to South Carolina and became a police officer, claiming to be a private college peace officer on this forum.

    Since a private college cannot have sworn law enforcement officers, as they're not a political sub-division of the state, they can request the state legislature pass a law to authorize them to have peace officers.

    When I contacted the "someone's" employer to find more information, I was told that they were confident that the legislature would authorize peace officer status.

    Its kinda like... Know how some states have park rangers who aren't police officers, but can still write you a conversation law ticket? They are usually "peace officers," or "Conservators of the Peace," who are charged with enforcing one or more laws of the state. Even if they are authorized to enforce just one law, they get peace officer status and can carry guns (in some states) and make arrests (for that one law.)

    Here in Wisconsin, there are DNR Wardens who are not considered LEOs, but are Peace Officers because they can enforce the traffic code and DNR rules on DNR land. (Department of Natural Resources is DNR, btw...)

    They can carry a concealed weapon because the statute says any peace officer may, but they can't go around arresting people off DNR land for murder on their state tin.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Ah, I see.

    I've got a couple of questions.

    #1. Do all Colleges/Universities (who have campus police) do the same thing (ie have Peace officers), or do some have peace officers and some have police?

    And

    #2. Related to #1, is there some kind of restriction for some colleges/universities? What I mean is, can the institution choose between peace officers and police, or is it just peace officers only for colleges/universities.

    I'm always curious about how other states do it (not just campus police, but policing in general). I admit how other states do things tend to confuse me.

    In Texas we tend to keep it real simple, but I've seen some complecated things in other places, like where in some places campus police have to be "subordinate" to the city police (the only time that happens here is with Transit police being subordinate to the "jurisdictional" police in their area), or how campus police have to be auxillary city police (in other words, they are not police in their own right) ect ect.

    I don't think Oregon (among other states) even has campus police, I visited the Oregon State Universite website a few days ago and their security is handled "jointly" by the OSU Department of Public Safety (headed by a director) and a Detachment of the Oregon State Police (led by a Lieutenant).
    Man, I just couldn't imagine that, 2 seperate organizations on the same campus, that just wouldn't work here, which is why some Texas School districts are ending their contracts with local PDs (the PDs provide School Resource officers) and creating their own School Police.
    ~~~

    Anyways, I think you'll like the change from contract to "in-house", I know I did.
    Last edited by Black Caesar; 05-31-2007, 07:09 AM.

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  • The Lord of the Keys
    replied
    Actually we will be completing what is called phase 1 of the police academy. Its the first 13 weeks. Full Police Officers have to go through 26 weeks. We will be peace officers. Instead of the normal 40 hours of firearm training for peace officers we will be given the 80 hours required of police recruits.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by The Lord of the Keys View Post
    We are getting 13 weeks at full pay includeing full police officer weapons training instead of the lesser number of hours required for peace officers. We will be issued the Glock in .45 ACP.
    Good for you. The full police certification can open other doors later on too I'd think.

    (on a side note)

    About 3 years ago I met my wife's half brother for the 1st time, he was a Campus peace officer with the City College of New York. During our conversation he mentioned that he was going to test with the Suffolk County Police and thought he had a good shot at it, the only thing he didn't like was (in his words) "If i get on with them, I have to go to the full police academy, I'm just a peace officer right now". (He didn't, him and his wife moved back to Georgia when she got a better job offer, now he works for the Savannah Chatham Police)

    Being from Texas I was perplexed. He said he was a peace officer already, but he'd have to "go to the full police academy" if he got the other job. We were simply on different pages because our states do things so differently.

    In NY there is a differance between Peace Officer and Police Officer and the training requirements are different (as far as i know talking to my brother in law and others I've met, correct me if I'm wrong).

    Texas dosen't have anything like that, here every Law Enforcement Officer is a "Peace Officer" and the different types (Police officer, Marshal, constable, Sheriff, game warden, State trooper, Airport police, Tranist, police, Campus police ect ect ect) are just differant Flavors (so to speak) of Peace Officer. So when someone says to me they are a Peace officer, I believed they'd have gone for the full ride of a police academy. I knew other states do it differently, but I didn't know how differently.

    To further complicate things, my wife's father (who she just met in person for the 1st time 3 years ago also) was a retired Deputy City Sheriff in Virginia. Before I met him, I didn't know there was such a thing as a City sheriff lol...

    America can be a confusing place .....


    I'm still working one night a week at the site with securitas. It gives me a chance to unwind. I'd like to know who else is or has worked in a similar envirnonment.
    Me of course, I work for a Community College District. I love it, which puts me at odds with a few other Campus cops I work with, but most of those types do their 2 years here and go work for some city PD or County sheriff so i don't have to put up with them for long .

    It can be frustrating as hell dealing with the various "factions" on campus, from the very liberal ex-flower child professors and admin types, to the little wannabe gang bangers who like to hang out on campus ect ect, But I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

    There's nothing better than watching people you protected walk across that stage and get that degree.......

    Leave a comment:


  • The Lord of the Keys
    replied
    We have it good here. The Academy is at the college I'll be working at which is also the college I've been guarding with Securitas. Four of my fellow recruits are my co-workers from securitas and a total of 8 recruits will be working at he college with me when we graduate.
    We are getting 13 weeks at full pay includeing full police officer weapons training instead of the lesser number of hours required for peace officers. We will be issued the Glock in .45 ACP.
    I'm still working one night a week at the site with securitas. It gives me a chance to unwind. I'd like to know who else is or has worked in a similar envirnonment.

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Congrats and good luck! Hopefully in the next year or two I will have a similar post. We have a lobbyist working on legislation right now to convert our security department into a licensed police department. Aside from the VA, we'd be the first hospital police in MN. So I may one day be in your shoes. Just focus young grasshopper, and you'll do fine.
    And to quote Black Caesar, no question is a dumb question. As an FTO, if you don't know something, there is only one way you'll ever figure it out, "ask ask ask." The people that don't ask questions are the one's that worry me, they start to seem like "know-it-alls."
    Last edited by sgtnewby; 05-28-2007, 01:28 PM.

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  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
    This point is probably the most important of all the responses you've had to your question. I'd say if you follow this single piece of advice and don't remember anything else we've suggested, you'll still succeed.

    Ask questions until you get it, otherwise the trainer can only assume you understand the point and move on. Chances are, if you're not getting it someone else isn't getting it either, but even if the whole class thinks you're dumb for asking questions, your trainer won't think so, I assure you. If anything, he'll think you're probably the one who's paying attention.
    Dynamic answer. The point to always while in training, role playing and exercises in general comes from military training, "Sweat more now, bleed less later." Ask yourself this question, "Would I rather be partnered with someone who just did enough to get by or someone who applied themselves 110% of the time all the time?" If they think all training is a waste of time or they know all this stuff already, would you want this person as your backup or depend upon them to save your life? I think not.
    If you failed to prepare for the class, then it is your fault and questioning something you should know is inexcusable. If however you have gone over the material and still don't under the concept, keep asking until you get it down pat.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Caesar View Post
    About the academy, the thing that stuck with me the most is "no question is a stupid one". Ask ask ask.
    This point is probably the most important of all the responses you've had to your question. I'd say if you follow this single piece of advice and don't remember anything else we've suggested, you'll still succeed.

    Ask questions until you get it, otherwise the trainer can only assume you understand the point and move on. Chances are, if you're not getting it someone else isn't getting it either, but even if the whole class thinks you're dumb for asking questions, your trainer won't think so, I assure you. If anything, he'll think you're probably the one who's paying attention.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-27-2007, 10:21 PM.

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  • Contact
    replied
    Originally posted by ff000525 View Post
    My tip: Pay attention and take everything seriously. The academy I'm finishing up is great, and taught by well qualified instructors, but some of the students don't take things all that serious. Their take on it is "I can just do the minimum right now, because I'll learn it all on the "street" anyways." or they find the role playing funny, so when we do traffic stops (practice) they can't keep a straight face because their classmate is the one giving them a hard time.
    I take everything to heart and try to pretend in my mind that these were/are real situations. When we get the Redman (TM) gear on or practice defense tactics, I don't hold any punches or "go easy" on the guy because I know him and I expect others to do the same with me. This way I know I can stay calm under stress, regardless if its "funny" stress or hostile stress, I know I can take a punch or 5 (or a knee to the face, yeah took one of those in training), and I know that when I need to defend myself, my body won't have to decide if I'm going to "take it a little easier" on the BG.
    I also concur about paying attention to the academics, because when you start working you won't have to worry about learning or relearning them, that way you'll have more time to hone and build on the skills you already have.

    Good job on getting hired!
    You know, I can sympathize with some of those guys. Right now I'm in an Advanced First Aid class at college and the first couple times I had to role play as a first responder or victim, I couldn't keep a straight face because I am pretty good friends with the hot chick I had to examine. I told her that if I was her first responder, she was going to have a few more bruises by the time we got to the hospital. After that though I was able to start role playing without laughing, because honestly, this training might save someones life.

    Leave a comment:


  • ff000525
    replied
    My tip: Pay attention and take everything seriously. The academy I'm finishing up is great, and taught by well qualified instructors, but some of the students don't take things all that serious. Their take on it is "I can just do the minimum right now, because I'll learn it all on the "street" anyways." or they find the role playing funny, so when we do traffic stops (practice) they can't keep a straight face because their classmate is the one giving them a hard time.
    I take everything to heart and try to pretend in my mind that these were/are real situations. When we get the Redman (TM) gear on or practice defense tactics, I don't hold any punches or "go easy" on the guy because I know him and I expect others to do the same with me. This way I know I can stay calm under stress, regardless if its "funny" stress or hostile stress, I know I can take a punch or 5 (or a knee to the face, yeah took one of those in training), and I know that when I need to defend myself, my body won't have to decide if I'm going to "take it a little easier" on the BG.
    I also concur about paying attention to the academics, because when you start working you won't have to worry about learning or relearning them, that way you'll have more time to hone and build on the skills you already have.

    Good job on getting hired!

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Bravo. You'll do fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by The Lord of the Keys View Post
    I just wanted to share the good news. At the college where I work for Securitas, we have lost the contract. Thats good for me because the college has decided to go with armed peace officers for security. I was one of the few current officers who qualified and applied. I start the academy this coming tuesday at full pay and benefits. My family and I are very exited. Does anyone have any advice for someone entering the acedemy?
    Good goin Keys, I love it when someone's hard work and loyalty pays off.

    About the academy, the thing that stuck with me the most is "no question is a stupid one". Ask ask ask. The Police Academy (going through it and getting out of it alive lol) was one of the best experiences of my life, right behind my wedding and the births of my children.

    Also, maintain the balance.

    By that I mean 2 things:

    #1. Be proud of the fact that you've made it in the gate, but don't let that turn to arrogance like soooo many recruits do. Thinking you are the God of Police and Lord of Man is the quickest path to failure and defeat you can imagine IMO.

    And #2. Be concerned about your progress, but don't let that concern turn to fear that will cause you to second guess yourself on crucial end of subject Test or practical exam. If you study and you know the material, thats all you need to do. And don't let the State Test at the end of the academy scare you either, just push on through.

    Good luck man.

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