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  • Batten Down the Hatches!

    For all you working in Atlantic and Gulf coastal states, this from NOAA yesterday regarding the current hurricane season (reprinted with permission):

    __________________________________________

    05/23/2007
    NOAA Predicts Above-Average Hurricane Season

    Experts at the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Prediction Center are projecting a 75 percent chance that the Atlantic hurricane season will be above normal this year-showing that the ongoing active hurricane era remains strong.

    NOAA predicts the occurrence of 13 to 17 storms this season with up to 10 of those storms becoming hurricane strength. And, the storm activity may be even stronger than predicted if La Niña cycles. A possible transition to La Niña conditions could occur within the next 1 to 3 months.

    To get ready for this active season, "National Hurricane Preparedness Week" began May 20th, and NOAA recommends those in hurricane-prone regions to begin their preparation plans. For your facility, those plans should include:

    * Repairing hurricane/storm shutters, patching roofs, and caulking windows.

    * Checking security and flood lighting.

    * Identifying and securing items that may be blown around.

    * Identifying emergency power requirements and determining if a generator needs to be purchased or rented. Test the generator monthly during peak season.

    * Determining computer support for employees who need to remain operational during a natural disaster.

    * Verifying that communications equipment is operational.

    * Stocking necessary emergency supplies. All emergency supplies should be clearly marked and stored in an area accessible in an emergency.

    * Preparing a list of vendors (and their telephone numbers) critical to your daily operations.

    The Atlantic hurricane season runs from June 1 through November 30, with peak activity occurring August through October. According to NOAA, an average Atlantic hurricane season brings 11 named storms, with 6 becoming hurricanes, including 2 major hurricanes.
    _________________________________________

    You might want to share this "action list" with authorities at your worksite(s). One other action item for security forces: Make sure every member of the security force has, understands, and has practiced the post orders or site instructions pertaining to hurricane events. We have no guarantees that Katrina can't happen all over again, so don't count on "outside help"! The more self-sustaining your venue is, the better off you'll be with respect to all disasters, not just hurricanes.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-24-2007, 01:38 PM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

  • #2
    That SecTrainer was an excellent posting. I find it sad when on a survey the one question to which the response is a blank stare or one of object bewilderment, "Where is your disaster preparedness annex to this plan?" So many security managers do not have one and corporate management has no clue. Even though the security guide is sent to them in advance of my site visit, many think security has no meaningful role in this. You would have thought by now since the disasters we've endured, the word will finally filtered down.
    You can't or shouldn't expect public assistance for your business when the public sector is already stretched to the limit.
    When Isabel came to call, people at the local Lowe's got into fistfights or had guns drawn to see who would buy the last dozen electrical generators.
    It's funny to see some of your neighbors wanting to store frozen foods in your freezer or take hot showers or "borrow" a couple gallons of water to flush toilets. You become really popular. Only a few are willing to return the favor with gasoline midterm in the crisis. Somehow they think it your civic duty to care for their needs.
    Thank you for bringing that to our attention.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Comment


    • #3
      People are such ostriches, sticking their heads in the sand. They don't want to think about bad stuff happening. (This is a problem generally in our line of work.)

      I had a friend who nearly went bust with a "disaster preparedness" store called Ready Or Not, despite having a great location, newspaper ads, the whole magilla. He really carried some neat gear and I couldn't see anything wrong with his prices.

      The place was a tomb whenever you walked in, no matter what day or time.

      Just before he was about to go down for the third time, he had a brilliant idea. He threw all his Coleman stoves, etc. in the window, renamed the store Campers Corner and turned business around within a few months. Same products, etc.

      Go figure.
      Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-24-2007, 05:11 PM.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
        People are such ostriches, sticking their heads in the sand. They don't want to think about bad stuff happening. (This is a problem generally in our line of work.)

        I had a friend who nearly went bust with a "disaster preparedness" store called Ready Or Not, despite having a great location, newspaper ads, the whole magilla. He really carried some neat gear and I couldn't see anything wrong with his prices.

        The place was a tomb whenever you walked in, no matter what day or time.

        Just before he was about to go down for the third time, he had a brilliant idea. He threw all his Coleman stoves, etc. in the window, renamed the store Campers Corner and turned business around within a few months. Same products, etc.

        Go figure.
        SecTrainer, he was among the very lucky few. Normally, when unprepared, seven out of 10 go down for the count and fail to return. In this day and age, I tell anyone willing to "hear" as opposed to "listen," there are few if any second chances.
        You cannot afford to just have a plan, it must be both realistic and practiced. You must be prepared to go it alone without commercial services for at least five days. You and your employees may have to shelter in place for at least the first 24-hours unless there was ample warning time and employees could be sent home. That means food, water and sanitation
        Enjoy the day,
        Bill

        Comment


        • #5
          He couldn't get anyone to come into the store when it was selling "emergency preparedness supplies and gear"...people didn't want to think about having any needs in that line.

          But, the minute he started selling the very same things as "camping and outdoors supplies and gear", the customers started to come to the store. They had no problem with "camping" (i.e., leisure time)...but thinking about "survival" (i.e., disasters) turned them off. Weird, eh?
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-24-2007, 09:47 PM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

          Comment


          • #6
            When Katrina hit my suprvisor and another SO rode out the storm in the guard shack at the steel mill. This is less than 20 miles from New Orleans. The next day I got through 3 State Police roadblocks to releive him.
            At the time the plant had a police that a skeleton crew of 1 EMT/SO, 1 SO, 2 supervisors from plant maintance and 1 employee of the water plant would ride out anything up to a Cat 4 hurricane. Those of us that worked during the Emergency period, (the day before, of and 2 days after the hurricane), got $100 bonus per shift.
            Since Katrina the policy has been revised. Anything bigger than a Cat 1 and everything shuts down and everyone leaves.
            Hospital Security Officer

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SecTrainer View Post
              He couldn't get anyone to come into the store when it was selling "emergency preparedness supplies and gear"...people didn't want to think about having any needs in that line.

              But, the minute he started selling the very same things as "camping and outdoors supplies and gear", the customers started to come to the store. They had no problem with "camping" (i.e., leisure time)...but thinking about "survival" (i.e., disasters) turned them off. Weird, eh?
              Sheep.

              .

              Comment


              • #8
                katrina

                Originally posted by EMTGuard View Post
                When Katrina hit my suprvisor and another SO rode out the storm in the guard shack at the steel mill. This is less than 20 miles from New Orleans. The next day I got through 3 State Police roadblocks to releive him.
                At the time the plant had a police that a skeleton crew of 1 EMT/SO, 1 SO, 2 supervisors from plant maintance and 1 employee of the water plant would ride out anything up to a Cat 4 hurricane. Those of us that worked during the Emergency period, (the day before, of and 2 days after the hurricane), got $100 bonus per shift.
                Since Katrina the policy has been revised. Anything bigger than a Cat 1 and everything shuts down and everyone leaves.
                you lucky i got nothing for staying for the strom i did get lot of ot but no bonus
                i was at best buy on westbank expway in my pov when strom hit
                Last edited by CAPTAIN KOOLAID; 05-30-2007, 05:38 AM. Reason: mispell
                CAPTAIN KOOLAID 9594


                oh ya

                Comment

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