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  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by kingsman View Post
    Michigan Security officers have police powers? I don't think so.

    Michigan has nealy no oversite or rules regarding Security. The only authority
    I have is due to the fact that I work for the federal government as a security
    officer.
    Your right. A Security Officer in MI has no Police Powers. He was talking about the Security Police Officers aka ACT 330 Security Officers.

    As for Oversight, even though there is no licensing there is always someone to answer to. In Michigan, for over 30 years it was MSP. In 2002 oversight was given to Department of Consumer and Industry Services, EXCEPT Act 330 Officers which still fall under MSP and assigned to MCOLES Division.

    Leave a comment:


  • kingsman
    replied
    Michigan Security officers have police powers? I don't think so.

    Michigan has nealy no oversite or rules regarding Security. The only authority
    I have is due to the fact that I work for the federal government as a security
    officer.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I just wore the full bat belt when I got dressed, and took it off with my uniform when I got home. Since employees were "on duty" when we left the house, and off duty when we entered the house, it was legal under FL statutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arff312
    replied
    I carry my firearm in a paddle holster to work. With my duty belt in the back of my car. When i get to work i transfer it over. I drive to work in full uniform so that i dont have to hurry up and change if we have something go down when i get to the office.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You know, I don't think I'd bring a shotgun on a public bus without a case. A discreet case. Long guns are hard to keep control of in tight spaces at times, and you don't want to have to put the hurt on some kid for grabbing it cause he thinks its funny the fake bacon has a gauge.
    Yeah tell me about it. That seems and sounds like something out of a Police Academy movie series.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    You know, I don't think I'd bring a shotgun on a public bus without a case. A discreet case. Long guns are hard to keep control of in tight spaces at times, and you don't want to have to put the hurt on some kid for grabbing it cause he thinks its funny the fake bacon has a gauge.

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier

    The State of Texas calls all armed security officers Commissioned Security Officers, and they are commissioned by the state to carry a firearm.

    .
    Beat me too it.

    In Texas, commissioned SOs can be armed to and from work. This turmps many other laws.

    For instance, the Transit police detained a guy in a SO uniform for openly carrying on a bus, just to find out what he was doing was legal because he was on his way to work. DART Transit cops will still asked to see a SOs commision card, but will still presume that the SO is going to or from work now (after the big blow up that resulted for that guy being detained).

    We have bus stops on our campuses. At one of them a guy shows up 5 days a week in a SO uniform carrying a shotgun. People have asked us (Campus police) if he can do that being that we're a gun free zone, and we tell them "yea he can" because he's on his way to work. Same thing with the Armored Car guys who fill the ATMs (sort of, they can come on campus armed because they are working, and have a contract for the service with the College district to boot).

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    Originally posted by GCMC Security
    FL states that you may only be armed in performance of your duties. That means you can't have it on to and from work.

    NOW there is a couple ways around it.

    1) If you have a CCW, when you leave work you can throw a sweatshirt/jacket/big tshirt/whatever over your uniform and gun and you are now carrying on your CCW. This does not include putting a company jacket on because you will still be "in uniform"

    2) The second one is a lil bit stretching it. Your company states that you are not off duty until you pull into your driveway. You are subject to being called back until you go 10-7.
    thats something i was thinking of bringing to fasco's attention . allowing security officers to carry to and from work.

    Leave a comment:


  • davis002
    replied
    Our company has no restrictions.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigdog
    replied
    In FL all security officers that all armed whether they are inhouse or contract must HAve a D & G license.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by bigshotceo
    It should be noted that said statuatory authority is not automatically granted to all security guards in Michigan, but rather is something that has to be applied for. Currently (or as of when the state last updated the website) there are nine organizations which have said PSPO's, including a hospital, shopping mall and school district.
    The rest of s/o's in the state have absolutely NO licensing requirements, whether they are armed or unarmed.

    Leave a comment:


  • bigshotceo
    replied
    Originally posted by Christopherstjo
    The state of Michigan is another state that has such laws; s/o's there are called "private security police officers" and have expressed statutory authority of police.
    It should be noted that said statuatory authority is not automatically granted to all security guards in Michigan, but rather is something that has to be applied for. Currently (or as of when the state last updated the website) there are nine organizations which have said PSPO's, including a hospital, shopping mall and school district.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christopherstjo
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy
    I stand corrected in your particular situation (special police officer status), although I did qualify my opinion by allowing for that exception. I have no problem with security officers receiving additional state powers.
    Its' cool.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Christopherstjo
    I realize the thought of private security officers being vested with police and arrest powers is a hard concept for most security officers who have no such authority to grasp let alone accept; presupposing that the security officer is a "wannabe" and so forth when they speak of such things. And yet, while I personally do not think it is a wise idea for states to be enacting such laws to give police and arrest powers to private security officers, in the absence of the proper mandated training; I did not pass the laws and it is what it is.

    The state of Michigan is another state that has such laws; s/o's there are called "private security police officers" and have expressed statutory authority of police.
    I stand corrected in your particular situation (special police officer status), although I did qualify my opinion by allowing for that exception. I have no problem with security officers receiving additional state powers.

    As far as I know, Washington State does not grant special police officer status.

    Leave a comment:


  • Christopherstjo
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy
    I would not call a private security license a commission, as that implies authority granted from a governing body, such as that which police officers are given. The only exception would be if you are considered a special police officer.
    I realize the thought of private security officers being vested with police and arrest powers is a hard concept for most security officers who have no such authority to grasp let alone accept; presupposing that the security officer is a "wannabe" and so forth when they speak of such things. And yet, while I personally do not think it is a wise idea for states to be enacting such laws to give police and arrest powers to private security officers, in the absence of the proper mandated training; I did not pass the laws and it is what it is.

    The state of Michigan is another state that has such laws; s/o's there are called "private security police officers" and have expressed statutory authority of police.
    Last edited by Christopherstjo; 05-15-2007, 11:54 AM.

    Leave a comment:

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