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  • #16
    Originally posted by BHR Lawson
    In my old PD as Explorers we drove this...



    Police cars look like this...



    We didn't actually have a "ViPS" but we had "Senior Patrol" which were Senior Citizens 55 and older who did things like attend a booth at fairs, walk in parades, do vacation house checks, etc... They drive a police car that has the old stripes on it.

    I've seen quite a few agencies with ViPS cars. I am relatively sure ViPS is a National Foundation.

    As far as the Reserve Academy goes in Washington, it is a minimum of 220 hours of instruction, with most academies providing more.
    A few other questions, if I may:

    1. Are these state academies, or departmental?

    2. If departmental, do they train to a state standard?

    3. Do you know if they typically offer training schedules that accommodate people with jobs, or do interested people have to use up vacation time, etc. to attend?
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by SecTrainer
      A few other questions, if I may:

      1. Are these state academies, or departmental?

      2. If departmental, do they train to a state standard?

      3. Do you know if they typically offer training schedules that accommodate people with jobs, or do interested people have to use up vacation time, etc. to attend?
      Each academy is hosted by an individual law enforcement agency such as a Police Department or Sheriff's Office. Typically one agency will host all the local LE agencies rather than each one having their own. Every academy must meet certain standards and teach from provided material from the Washington Criminal Justice Training Commission. The WSCJTC also has certain instructors that will come in. They also have certain standards on who can teach what, for instance... Criminal Law and Criminal Procedures must be taught by a Prosecutor. Firearms, EVOC, and Defensive Tactics must be instructed by WSCJTC certified Firearms, EVOC, and DT instructors.

      At the end of the academy you must take the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission Reserve Peace Officer Examination which is proctored by WSCJTC.

      The academies typically come with a set schedule. If you cannot make the schedule, you cannot attend the academy. I know during my academy time I lost a TON of hours at work which my boss was most gracious to give me off LWOP and Vacation.

      EDIT TO ADD:

      I am not certain, but certain community colleges may have Reserve Officer Classes that are more time flexible. I am not sure about this, they may still be around, but I think they have done away with them.
      Last edited by Lawson; 05-10-2007, 10:34 AM.
      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
      "The Curve" 1998

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by BHR Lawson
        Each academy is hosted by an individual law enforcement agency such as a Police Department or Sheriff's Office. Typically one agency will host all the local LE agencies rather than each one having their own. Every academy must meet certain standards and teach from provided material from the Washington Criminal Justice Training Commission. The WSCJTC also has certain instructors that will come in. They also have certain standards on who can teach what, for instance... Criminal Law and Criminal Procedures must be taught by a Prosecutor. Firearms, EVOC, and Defensive Tactics must be instructed by WSCJTC certified Firearms, EVOC, and DT instructors.

        At the end of the academy you must take the Washington State Criminal Justice Training Commission Reserve Peace Officer Examination which is proctored by WSCJTC.

        The academies typically come with a set schedule. If you cannot make the schedule, you cannot attend the academy. I know during my academy time I lost a TON of hours at work which my boss was most gracious to give me off LWOP and Vacation.

        EDIT TO ADD:

        I am not certain, but certain community colleges may have Reserve Officer Classes that are more time flexible. I am not sure about this, they may still be around, but I think they have done away with them.
        Thanks for the good poop, Mr. Lawson!
        "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

        "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

        "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

        "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
          Ok, I've wondered about this. Talking with Derick002, I found out that "reserve police" in Minnesota are totally different than what I'm used to. A Reserve Police Officer to me is a volunteer who works as a sworn law enforcement officer when "on duty," and patrols with another full-time professional sworn officer, or works with another sworn reservist.

          The "reserve program" described to me would be called a "Volunteer in Policing" or "Auxiliary Police" force to me. Non-sworn, no enforcement authority, handling minor problems and providing visible patrol.
          In Minnesota it varies by department what the Reserve Police Officers are able to do. What you described is pretty much right on. I have found that sometimes certain reserves "forget" they are not licensed officers.

          Comment


          • #20
            Personally...I'm no longer interested in LE work. I was at one point, but not now. Heck, in the 6 years that has passed since I last worked security and now, I've found I'm a completely different person in how I handle situtations. To be honest, even though I try and still perform the duties I'm given as professionally as possible, I'm much less willing to risk my safety over some college kids having a party or whatnot especially considering the pay I'm making. Given the circumstances I've been put in lately, I'd feel safer working at the county jail as a detention officer, but I don't want to deal with the politics again, but I will say the comraderie at the sheriff's office was better than the "CYA" attitude in the security field.
            ‎"If you can't tolerate humor directed at you, you do not deserve to be taken seriously"

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by Taktiq
              I will say the comraderie at the sheriff's office was better than the "CYA" attitude in the security field.
              Really? I'd think that the one place you'd want to CYA is in a jail!

              (Oh, gar, I cracked myself up - NO PUN INTENDED)
              Last edited by SecTrainer; 05-10-2007, 11:31 AM.
              "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

              "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

              "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

              "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by BHR Lawson
                In my old PD as Explorers we drove this...



                Police cars look like this...



                We didn't actually have a "ViPS" but we had "Senior Patrol" which were Senior Citizens 55 and older who did things like attend a booth at fairs, walk in parades, do vacation house checks, etc... They drive a police car that has the old stripes on it.

                I've seen quite a few agencies with ViPS cars. I am relatively sure ViPS is a National Foundation.

                As far as the Reserve Academy goes in Washington, it is a minimum of 220 hours of instruction, with most academies providing more.
                That's so awesome. The PD, where I was a explorer with didn't have a car just for the explorers. We drove the police cars (yes, with the red and blue light bar, without the out-of-service banner.) We had "explorer" magnets that went somewhere on the car.
                "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                Comment


                • #23
                  Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                  Now for the fun question: Why do police explorers need police cars, even with amber lights?
                  At my old PD we did countless traffic control details. One year we saved the city over $50,000 in OT costs. We were the only explorer's on the east coast that were allowed to drive police cars.
                  "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Originally posted by BadBoynMD
                    We were the only explorer's on the east coast that were allowed to drive police cars.
                    Which is strange, because LFL strictly forbids explorers from driving marked police vehicles.

                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Policy Statement on Driving Marked Cars

                    There have been sufficient reports of Law Enforcement Explorers driving marked patrol cars to cause concern for their safety. Law Enforcement Explorers in uniform driving patrol cars may readily be identified by the (good guy) public (in emergency need) or a bad guy (i.e. gang, drug dealer, etc.) as an official law enforcement officer. This is potentially putting inexperienced (immature) youth in harm's way. A Law Enforcement Explorer should never be placed in a situation that would present the appearance of him/her being a legal law enforcement officer.

                    The following policy statement is in effect immediately:

                    "NO LAW ENFORCEMENT EXPLORER,
                    WHETHER IN UNIFORM OR NOT,
                    SHOULD DRIVE A MARKED PATROL VEHICLE."


                    The only exception to this policy is in authorized competitions in which an adult law enforcement official shall ride in the front passenger seat.

                    National Law Enforcement Ride-Along (addendum)
                    • Use of armored vest is recommended as available on Ride-Along.
                    • The following offensive/defensive equipment use and carrying (other than in training experiences) is prohibited: firearms, chemical sprays, and baton. It is also strongly recommended that Explorers do not carry handcuffs.
                    • The qualified Ride-Along officer must be off probation and have a one-year departmental tenure in good standing.


                    Source: LFL Law Enforcement Exploring Policy
                    Last edited by davis002; 05-10-2007, 12:56 PM.
                    "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      LFL guidelines are simply for BSA insurance purposes. As an Explorer Post you are allowed to set your own guidelines, which includes allowing Explorers to drive cars.

                      If however; an Explorer becomes injured while performing an activity that is not covered by LFL policy, they will not be covered under the BSA insurance.
                      "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                      "The Curve" 1998

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        I did Security and was an Auxiliary Deputy Sheriff then moved and got hired as a Sergeant/Shift Supervisor at a mall. I am trying to get back into the LEO thing.

                        As far as Explorers go, great program. I was a Sheriffs Office explorer, a Police Explorer, Fire Explorer and EMS Explorer. We never drove cruisers aside from training but as a Fire Explorer, we were trained in pumps and overall operations of the fire apparatus. Those we drove "hot" to the scene, and you had to be at least 17 years of age to do that.
                        Last edited by FireEMSPolice; 05-10-2007, 01:34 PM.
                        "I am not a hero. I am a silent guardian, a watchful protector"

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Originally posted by BHR Lawson
                          LFL guidelines are simply for BSA insurance purposes. As an Explorer Post you are allowed to set your own guidelines, which includes allowing Explorers to drive cars.

                          If however; an Explorer becomes injured while performing an activity that is not covered by LFL policy, they will not be covered under the BSA insurance.
                          That's incorrect. It's a policy and not a guideline. If your post is affiliated with LFL, then it must follow the policies set by LFL. You cannot pick and choose what policies you follow.
                          "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by davis002
                            Which is strange, because LFL strictly forbids explorers from driving marked police vehicles.

                            ------------------------------------------------------------------------

                            Policy Statement on Driving Marked Cars

                            There have been sufficient reports of Law Enforcement Explorers driving marked patrol cars to cause concern for their safety. Law Enforcement Explorers in uniform driving patrol cars may readily be identified by the (good guy) public (in emergency need) or a bad guy (i.e. gang, drug dealer, etc.) as an official law enforcement officer. This is potentially putting inexperienced (immature) youth in harm's way. A Law Enforcement Explorer should never be placed in a situation that would present the appearance of him/her being a legal law enforcement officer.

                            The following policy statement is in effect immediately:

                            "NO LAW ENFORCEMENT EXPLORER,
                            WHETHER IN UNIFORM OR NOT,
                            SHOULD DRIVE A MARKED PATROL VEHICLE."


                            The only exception to this policy is in authorized competitions in which an adult law enforcement official shall ride in the front passenger seat.

                            National Law Enforcement Ride-Along (addendum)
                            • Use of armored vest is recommended as available on Ride-Along.
                            • The following offensive/defensive equipment use and carrying (other than in training experiences) is prohibited: firearms, chemical sprays, and baton. It is also strongly recommended that Explorers do not carry handcuffs.
                            • The qualified Ride-Along officer must be off probation and have a one-year departmental tenure in good standing.


                            Source: LFL Law Enforcement Exploring Policy
                            Strange, yet very much true. I, recall the faces of the county police exploreres, when they realized we showed up to the county fair in one of the brand new police cruisers, without any of the police officers from our department present. This was 12 years ago give or take a year. We were covered under the cities insurance. We all had radio's, call signs and were authorized to stop for disabled vehicles and traffic accidents. It was fun times and we trained alot..specially when, I made post captain.
                            "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by BadBoynMD
                              Strange, yet very much true. I, recall the faces of the county police exploreres, when they realized we showed up to the county fair in one of the brand new police cruisers, without any of the police officers from our department present. This was 12 years ago give or take a year. We were covered under the cities insurance. We all had radio's, call signs and were authorized to stop for disabled vehicles and traffic accidents. It was fun times and we trained alot..specially when, I made post captain.
                              If this was 12 years ago, then that makes sense. LFL is not the same now as it used to be. This policy went into effect during my time as a Police Explorer in the late 90s.
                              "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                As an Explorer we did tons of stuff, I drove marked units all the time under the city's insurance policy. We had a park patrol detail where we patrolled our city's 25 parks looking for criminal activity and trespasses between 7pm and 3am, we would contact people, fill out information on them then turn it in at the end of the night. If we had to, we had an officer come out and make an arrest.

                                Never once had any run-ins with LFL, from what I got, LFL policies dictate for BSA insurance policies and any post may form their own policies, but if they go against what LFL says, they are not covered under the Insurance provided in their Post Charter.
                                "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                                "The Curve" 1998

                                Comment

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