Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

SO Conduct Question

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Bern Wheaton
    replied
    Sounds like the supervisor should take a chill pill and went home. and kept his personal life out of company time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Maelstrom
    replied
    Write up the incident and forward it onto his immediate superior, you can't deal with him directly by the sounds of it...

    BTW leave his ex-girlfriend alone even if she is smokin' hot!

    * sorry that humour switch kicked in again *

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    As stated earlier, using foul language with a Officer in the public eye and dealing with a volatile situation all at once is completely unprofessional and uncalled for. Leaders are supposed to train and mentor their subordinates. This "supervisor" did a coule of things that may have damaged the confidence of officer. Embarrasment as well as undermining his authority. This Supervisor gave this industry a black eye to all who stoodby and watched this scenario play out. And as to the question why a security officer is handling a domestic dispute/violence in the first place...... It happens all the time. Most often, it is the security officer that is the first responder. Under these circumstances, I have detained, given first aid, called for EMS and LE and called for my own back up. All because I was in the area at the time.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Security_Noob
    replied
    I am an in house s/o who works on private property. So I have been istructed to get involved, up to the point where I deem it unsafe to do so. At which time I am to contact LE. I took over Chargers job at Bridgegate apartments

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    So, are you supposed to actually involve yourself in situations, or call 911 and not become involved?

    Leave a comment:


  • Security_Noob
    replied
    My question in all this is not who showed more professionalism, but why, if you witnessed this incident, did you not step in?

    Because I was the S/O being dressed down

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Sounds like some supervision/command training is needed here, as well as better supervision of the supervisors.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    I am a boss and I occasionally stop into work while off duty to check e-mails, my mailbox, see if there are any questions, etc. Of course, I am in-house. If the supervisor in question is in-house, I am guessing the same is true for him.

    However, I would never think of dressing down my staff in front of anyone, especially in the middle of a situation and with something that didn't even involve a job performance issue.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    ...I wonder if the client will drop the account for this?
    Not likely. He's in-house.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Ok, lets see...

    First, what you do in a domestic (is it domestic violence? A disturbance without battery? That makes a lot of difference in response by police, and should for security as well.) depends a lot on what kind of protection the client wants and expects.

    If you are there to observe and report, you leave the area and call 911 and tell them that you cannot go back to the area to get more information because you cannot become involved. Period. That's what you're paid to do.

    if you are there to intervene, or have a charge of enforcing laws on private property, then you should be doing what you're paid to do. Determine the situation, take enforcement action, contact the police if needed.

    As far as this supervisor, the first thing I would of determined was why he was on a site off-duty to begin with. Most companies are smart and do not let hourly supervisory personnel work off-duty, as they can file a claim. After that, counseling would be required (as stated in a policy manual) for his violations of company policy. Which would be numerous.

    This is a very good reason why companies should have Employee Assistance Plans in place, so that they can find an outlet for their personal problems before they affect their job, and cost the company money.

    Also, if I was "in charge" and found out about this, I would make a special order and place it in the supervisor's personnel jacket that he is not to come in unnecessary contact with the employee while on duty.

    Violation of a direct order is always(*) grounds for termination in my hire book.

    (*) Documented extended circumstances may always apply.


    I wonder if the client will drop the account for this?

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    [QUOTE]
    Originally posted by Investigation
    Domestics, along with traffic stops, are one of the most dangerous things to deal with (in LE terms). And, having a supervisor acting out of line does not help. Dialing 911 would have been a good choice along with a well written letter to upper management that explains what occurred.
    Absolutely! A domestic can turn ugly in a matter of a second. I don't see a problem with security officers handling domestics. That is only if it's to keep parties seperated till the police arrive. Questioning shouldn't occur, at all. That's the job of the police. However, this security supervisor obviously isn't supervisor material. Obviously whoever trained him didn't embed into his head that when you are OFF you are OFF.

    There is no place for a supervisor like this in the Security Industry. If I were managing this guy he would have been fired or bumped down in rank and sent to watch an abandoned oil well during 3 watch.
    I wouldn't even give him that responsibility. I'd assigned him to midnights watching a shed in the middle of the woods.

    Leave a comment:


  • Taktiq
    replied
    Originally posted by Security_Noob
    I ran into a situation the other day that really disturbed me. I witnessed a new Security Officer getting publicly berated by his training officer. The new SO was trying to deal with a domestic disturbance when his supervisor (who was off duty at the time) started to shout at him about a laundry room door that was not checked. The SO calmly asked his supervisor which laundry room he was refering to, at which the supervisor replied, " It doesn't [email protected]#$ing matter!" He then went on to publicly and with multiple expeletives, acuse the SO of having an affair with his ex-girlfriend who had just broken up with him. This, coupled with the arrival of another combative subject, elevated the situation from a simple call that should have lasted no more than 20 minutes, to a very tense situation that lasted more than an hour. Now I ask you, who showed more professionalism?
    First off, in my opinion, if the FTO was off duty, he had no business getting involved in the situation and the moment he started becoming verbally abusive is when he could be treated as any other verbally abusive subject. Supervisor or not, if he's not supposed to be there under any circumstances and he become out of control as the other subjects and refused reasonable commands to leave the property, then he's trespassing and is risking getting hooked up as well. Simple as that.

    Secondly, when it comes to domestics, unless it what called out as a noise complaint or whatnot, I always did as the police do...call for assistance, wait for their arrival and then proceed.

    My question in all this is not who showed more professionalism, but why, if you witnessed this incident, did you not step in?
    Last edited by Taktiq; 05-05-2007, 05:16 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Investigation
    replied
    Domestics, along with traffic stops, are one of the most dangerous things to deal with (in LE terms). And, having a supervisor acting out of line does not help. Dialing 911 would have been a good choice along with a well written letter to upper management that explains what occurred.

    There is no place for a supervisor like this in the Security Industry. If I were managing this guy he would have been fired or bumped down in rank and sent to watch an abandoned oil well during 3 watch.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMS 525
    replied
    In my case, least thing would get a complaint about your conduct to the upper echelon staff. Worst case, you'd get my sap up along side your fat, thick head!!! If that security company thinks someone like that is management/training material, I think it's time to find another company to work for.

    Only once did I ever make a scene in public with one of my charges is because he brought it on himself.

    And domestics; something security shouldn't really get involved in any more than they have to, and that's just to either eject the problem from their account, or to insure no one gets hurt, until the LE arrives to take over.

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    It's days like this, that the hardest thing about my job is insuring the pumps
    are working at the sewer treatment plant.

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X