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    Hello everyone, my name is David M. Marchetti and I am from Connecticut. I am a 20 year vet of the industry and for the last fourteen years I have been the operator/ owner of a security agency that's licensed by the Department of Public Safety a Division of the State Police. Just by chance I found this site and I think it's great that we fellow public safety professionals have a place to vent and have some good conversation.
    Last edited by Marchetti, David, M; 01-22-2007, 05:41 AM.

  • #2
    Welcome to the mix. I hope you will find it as interesting as I do.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Comment


    • #3
      Welcome to the forums.


      The concept of citations for line of duty performance is not new to me, but the actual deployment of that concept as reality is. So far, the only company I have seen actually issue "pins" or "certification bars" is IPC, which signify company instructors, life savers, etc.

      In my own SOP manual, several "Premier Uniform and Accessories" citation pins, as well as citation pins from Smith and Warren Badge Makers, are stipulated as authorized wear. These pins and citations include such things as membership in select units (HRSU, CRO, Bicycle Patrol, etc); service awards (Good Conduct, Leadership, etc), and other such things.

      Most security guards consider such things "cheap immitations of the police," but they're also working for a warm body company from 9 am to 5 pm, and don't expect to be woken from their reading during that shift - or perform the duties of a uniformed receptionist.

      Any company that uses such awards and HR principles, which in other service organizations (retail, police, fire, EMS, sales, etc) have demonstrated a quantifable increase in employee "self-worth" and retainability will reap such rewards as increased comraderie, esprit de corps, loyalty to the agency, and loyalty to supervisors.
      Some Kind of Commando Leader

      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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      • #4
        I love this idea personally.... However the companies I worked for previously did not allow them in any way, shape, or form. The uniform code had to be adhered to STRICTLY. Now, though, I wear a few various pins on my uniform signifying certifications/training I've completed. (ASP, OC Instructor, etc.) I also wear a pin issued to me from a local Police Agency for completing their 'Citizen's Academy'/Volunteer program. That one in particular seems to get me a little more respect from LEO's, as it points out that I actually AM interested in what they do, and am willing to volunteer my time to help them whenever I can.
        Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
        Originally posted by ValleyOne
        BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
        Shoulda called in sick.
        Be safe!

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Bridgegate
          Now, though, I wear a few various pins on my uniform signifying certifications/training I've completed. (ASP, OC Instructor, etc.)
          I'd like to do that as well, but our uniform standards are super-strict. Behind our photo ID, we have to carry laminated copies of our ASP, OCAT, CPR/AEAD, etc etc certs, but no pins.

          I'd like to wear my old "tactical unit" and "fto" bars, but I need the steady paychecks

          Comment


          • #6
            Welcome to the forum.
            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
              .....I see that some members make mention of how some police do not like private security providers, this is very very true sad to say.
              Many police departments are stretched thin, budget wise and personnel. When petty crimes occur, criminal mischief, etc., the police are irritated when the complainant expects them to investigate the crime. Often, the violation is simply listed as "record only," and it's off to a more pressing matter.

              If the police could handle every criminal problem, then security would not be needed. The fact is, they can't. Even so, some officers get upset when we end up in their jurisdiction. The public is tired of having their concerns buried under the ever increasing mountain of paperwork and higher priorities.

              Security is the answer to those and other problems. The security industry will continue to grow considerably in order to meet the demands that the police can no longer handle by themselves. Those who refuse to recognize this will be steamrolled as terrorism gains a foothold in the USA and the public DEMANDS to feel protected. Police assets will then be devoted towards countering this threat and security will have to supplement LE to get the job done.
              Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

              Comment


              • #8
                The idea of wearing awards on the uniform is a nice idea IMO. Several of the places I worked, including the company I work for now, use medals to signify certifications, awards, and things such as tenure. We do have specific pins for "officer safety", "driver safety", and "felony arrest". The felony arrest pin was only awarded after the successful arrest and conviction of a felony suspect. A couple of the officers I know built up quite a resume by documenting each case like that they worked and putting them in a portfolio. This created quite an impression when some went to apply for law enforcement positions. They were hired in pretty quickly. Fabulous idea if you ask me.
                "We appreciate all the hard work you've done, the dedicated hours you have worked, and the lives you have saved. However, since this is your third time being late to work, we are terminating your employment here."

                Comment


                • #9
                  If I remember correctly, it is not against United States Code, or the UCMJ, to wear a military ribbon on a civilian or para-military uniform if the award device or ribbon was lawfully awarded for military or civilian service in the US/Allied Armed Forces. It is always safe practice to have a copy of the order promulgating the award of the device on file, in case some idiot decides to go after the employee wearing it, and a copy of their DD-214. (Which you should have on file anyway, especially if they're claiming Veteran's Points, if you have a Veteran's Preference Program in your HR policies.)

                  Police Citations, however, is a grey area. If the citation has the words "Police, Law Enforcement," etc, that would make a reasonable person believe that the device indicates the wearer is a sworn LEO, then its bad. But, if your wearing one that says "F.T.O.," or a standdard "Good Conduct" citation which the NYPD seemed to create, and is used in security and LE the country over... Its not a LE citation, its simply some colors on a bar.
                  Some Kind of Commando Leader

                  "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
                    Hey Guys,

                    .... Here in Connecticut we can arrest on sight for any offense, however we must see the offense committed......
                    Does your company regularly make misdemeanor arrests? If so, what kind (other than trespass or shoplifting)? What happens when you encounter a "he said; she said" defense in court due to one eyewitness testimony w/o corroborating evidence?

                    The reason I ask is because many security companies shy away from misdemeanor arrests for fear of a legal backlash.
                    Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jimmyhat
                      I always like to see Security/Police Officers displaying some sort of miniature badge, or ribbon that denotes Military service or qualification. It kind of lets me know where I stand with that person, knowing their past experience if I'm familiar with the award. The only time I may disagree is when wearing Jump or Air Assault wings. It almost says that the private security company can operate in this capacity. AIR ASSAULT SECURITY. Now, that would be hard-core!!

                      Myself, I've worn a particular Army Infantry badge on every uniform I've ever been issued since the day I earned the award. I'd hate to think of myself as vain, I just love talking to people who recognize the badge and share their same experiences with me.

                      Mr. Marchetti mentions that security personnel in Connecticut can't display Military decorations, I'd hate to be the supervisor that has to tell a U.S. Marine that he/she can't display the Globe and Anchor!!!!
                      Is it bad that part of my SOP, 5.1.14 Authorized Wear - Non Standard Tie Bars, specifically authorizes USMC tie bars, in the second line? The first was "Cultural Heritage Organizations"

                      Definately not going to tell a jarhead that he can't wear a globe and anchor on a squared away uniform. That'd be like telling an Irishman he can't wear his Irish/USA Flag pin.
                      Some Kind of Commando Leader

                      "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mr. Security
                        Does your company regularly make misdemeanor arrests? If so, what kind (other than trespass or shoplifting)? What happens when you encounter a "he said; she said" defense in court due to one eyewitness testimony w/o corroborating evidence?

                        The reason I ask is because many security companies shy away from misdemeanor arrests for fear of a legal backlash.
                        Marchetti, David, M . Did you copy?
                        Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
                          Hey Guys,

                          Things here in Connecticut are a little bit different I guess from where you are. Here in Connecticut we are licensed by the Department of Public Safety a Division of the State Police that's who we have to answer to. Company policies vary between companies some have no touch policy's, etc. As for myself I go by the book and use the laws that are provided to us as I am not scared of being sued. Here in Connecticut we can arrest on sight for any offense, however we must see the offense committed. We may use reasonable force to effect an arrest, to protect people & property. Meaning if I tell you to leave the property I can physically remove you or even arrest you for trespass. We are authorized to investigate the commission of any offence upon client property, tow and impound vehicle as directed, and a host of other things, we don't even need a license to carry a night stick in our vehicles and we can be armed.

                          The State of Connecticut defines us as: "Security officer" means the licensed and registered person hired to safeguard and protect persons and property, by (A) the detection or prevention of any unlawful intrusion or entry, larceny, vandalism, abuse, arson or trespass on property such security officer is hired to protect, or (B) the prevention, observation, or detection of any unauthorized activity on property the security officer was hired to protect. Such security officer may be (i) employed by a security service, or (ii) employed by a business and is a uniformed employee who performs security work on the premises of the employer's business when such premises are located in an area that is accessible and unrestricted to the public, or has access only by paid admission.

                          To some degree you fellow sound overly regulated :O( almost like your hands are tied. As for citations yes we can not wear POLICE or MILITARY citations however we can wear custom citations that are diffrent in design :O). As for rewarding my employees I have just always given them up to $100.00 bonus for a job well done.
                          J

                          Just curious here, when you refer to your arrest powers you mean citizens arrest powers? Also the reasonable force is also under state supreme court rulings as a private citizen or in aid/directed by a police officer. Unless you have been appointed a special constable you have no arrest authority other than that of a private citizen that I am aware of. Yes, it is easier on private property as a security officer to enforce some of the clients regulations but once you hit public domain, without post certification you're Joe Public and asking for a lawsuit.
                          Old age and treachery will defeat youth and enthusiasm every time-

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by ycaso77

                            Just curious here, when you refer to your arrest powers you mean citizens arrest powers? ....
                            In his case, yes.
                            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              I don't know if this has been posted elsewhere but in Canada the criminal code covers the whole country. Criminal laws do not vary province by province. (Civil laws do). Here we, being a private citizen, can arrest when we see someone committing an Indictable Offense. (You in the US call them felonies). A private citizen can not arrest for Summary Conviction Offenses (lesser crimes) unless the person is being chased by someone who has the right to make the arrest. There is an extra power that we as Security have. The owner of property or his agent can arrest for Indictable offenses AND Summary Convictions that take place on or in relation to his property. Off hand I can't remember which laws are involved but in a few cases it actually gives us more power than a police officer. Some laws require them to get a warrant that, as long as the crime was committed on or in relation to our property, we don't need.
                              I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                              Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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