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Hospital Security Kudos

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  • echo06
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You respond to 911 calls for police service? Wow, I've never heard of that before. Did they just reprogram 9-911 to dial the security office, or does the 911 dispatch center transfer all calls to the hospital security dispatcher?
    It gets transfered to to our command center and the police dept all at the same time here.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by djg_1982
    In my 2 years experience in hospital security, one of the worst experiences was when our hospital pharmacy was robbed while I was on duty. The suspect supposedly had a weapon, but did not show one. A good thing for me is that the suspect got away. Because we are not armed and the only weapon I could of used was my radio and handcuffs. Close by our hospital is a youth prison. And the city jail holds inmates for township in the area, so of course we get alot of prisoners. I once had a drunk prisoner spit in my face.
    Psh don't knock having a radio, we had an officer attacked by an irate visitor, he struck him with the radio, which stopped the suspect long enough for another officer to take him to the ground.

    Leave a comment:


  • djg_1982
    replied
    In my 2 years experience in hospital security, one of the worst experiences was when our hospital pharmacy was robbed while I was on duty. The suspect supposedly had a weapon, but did not show one. A good thing for me is that the suspect got away. Because we are not armed and the only weapon I could of used was my radio and handcuffs. Close by our hospital is a youth prison. And the city jail holds inmates for township in the area, so of course we get alot of prisoners. I once had a drunk prisoner spit in my face.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Out here, I do not think we can legally deny a patient the right to call 9-1-1, so now the dispatchers will call us rather than sending units out this way.

    Leave a comment:


  • HospitalOfc.
    replied
    Originally posted by sgtnewby
    911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )

    Our phone system is set up the same way, and it does significantly cut down on the number of nuisance calls to Police Dispatch from Psych patients.

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    Unless people dial from their cell phones, of course, and then I presume the PD would then just notify you?
    If they know the location of the person calling from the cell phone, I think they would, but I haven't come across that one yet.

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  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by sgtnewby
    911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )
    Unless people dial from their cell phones, of course, and then I presume the PD would then just notify you?

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    One of my hotels has a system when someone dials 9 (for an outside line) & 9-1-1 an alarm goes off at the switchboard letting us know.

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    You respond to 911 calls for police service? Wow, I've never heard of that before. Did they just reprogram 9-911 to dial the security office, or does the 911 dispatch center transfer all calls to the hospital security dispatcher?
    911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )
    Last edited by sgtnewby; 04-22-2007, 10:38 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by HospitalOfficer
    Thanks to everyone for the kudos. I can speak from 3 years of experience. We have a saying at my facility "Their Worst Day Is Our Everyday" Burnout is very high. Your constantly dealing with homeless, overdoses, violent individuals, suicidals. I've had every type of body fluid known to man on me But I wouldn't be doing anything else. Once again guys its nice to see someone appreciates what we do!
    emphasis mine

    The sad thing is most the time it's not the hospital employees that we work for that appreciate what we do!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by sgtnewby
    Luckily for us, we are 911, so we get all of those calls. We have 1 psych eval unit next to the ER, and 6 in-patient psych units. We weren't always 911, but after so many rediculous 911 calls to MPD, they suggested that we become 911 for our hospital.
    You respond to 911 calls for police service? Wow, I've never heard of that before. Did they just reprogram 9-911 to dial the security office, or does the 911 dispatch center transfer all calls to the hospital security dispatcher?

    Leave a comment:


  • HospitalOfficer
    replied
    Thanks to everyone for the kudos. I can speak from 3 years of experience. We have a saying at my facility "Their Worst Day Is Our Everyday" Burnout is very high. Your constantly dealing with homeless, overdoses, violent individuals, suicidals. I've had every type of body fluid known to man on me But I wouldn't be doing anything else. Once again guys its nice to see someone appreciates what we do!

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky
    GCMC Your baker act is the same as our Section 12. The thing is that the person being observed can not be medicated while in custody because it would give a false outcome of their behaviour. Sorry if this offends anyone (NOT) but the local PD gets 911 calls from the Sec 12 unit with people stating that They are being held against their will and that there is a conspiracy against them. The PD has to respond irregardless to all and any 911 calls. The hospital does all they can to keep them away from phones but with all they have to do sometimes it slips through the cracks to lock or remove the phones.

    Luckily for us, we are 911, so we get all of those calls. We have 1 psych eval unit next to the ER, and 6 in-patient psych units. We weren't always 911, but after so many rediculous 911 calls to MPD, they suggested that we become 911 for our hospital.

    Leave a comment:


  • sgtnewby
    replied
    Thanks!

    Thanks for the kudos from Hennepin County Medical Center Security in Minneapolis!

    Leave a comment:


  • GCMC Security
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky
    GCMC Your baker act is the same as our Section 12. The thing is that the person being observed can not be medicated while in custody because it would give a false outcome of their behaviour. Sorry if this offends anyone (NOT) but the local PD gets 911 calls from the Sec 12 unit with people stating that They are being held against their will and that there is a conspiracy against them. The PD has to respond irregardless to all and any 911 calls. The hospital does all they can to keep them away from phones but with all they have to do sometimes it slips through the cracks to lock or remove the phones.
    Here, we take the phones out of the room. They are put in a hospital gown and their personal items are put aside for safekeeping. They are not allowed any visitors except for thier doctor or a lawyer.

    That's how it's supposed to work. It's not perfect adn sometimes thenursing staff lets them get away with things and all we can do is lodge a complaint that usually gets ignored. There have been times that I have allowed a family member in to the room because it calms the person down. Anything to make my job easier.

    Also here, a LEO can place someone in a baker act and they drop them off and leave us with them. I feel if they baker act them they should provide the sitter in the ER but nope.

    Leave a comment:

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