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  • #16
    Originally posted by HotelSecurity
    Once the frequencies are found the next challange it to figure out the 10 codes!
    No problem.

    1. Set a fire in a trash can in the lobby...and listen for the 10-codes.

    2. Stick up the front desk...and listen for the 10-codes.

    3. Rent a room and flood the bathroom....and listen for the 10-codes.

    4. Complain to the front desk about noise in the next room...and listen for the 10-codes.

    5. Throw your food at a waitress in the coffee shop...and listen for the 10-codes.

    6. Press the emergency button on the elevator...and listen for the 10-codes.

    7. Call for room service which you then deny ordering...and listen for the 10 codes.

    8. Blow up a homeless bum out in the back parking lot...and listen for the 10 codes.

    Gradually, you'll get the whole list. Heck, you might even be assigned your OWN 10-code! It may take awhile to work through all the codes, because you'll be in and out of prison. But hey - no pain, no gain, as they say. Anything worth doing is worth doing well.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 04-21-2007, 03:48 PM.
    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Chucky
      In a recent post I mentioned that I purchased a small scanner to use at work to help alleviate the boredom of watching folks walk around for 6.5 hours. Unlike my more expensive scanner at home this little sucker picks up any signal within 2 miles without having to program it in. Some unwanted and some very interesting. Within the range I pick up a local hospitals security.

      I have always known that Hospital Security is one of the most intensive on the go all the time types of security but after listening to their 3 person crew I am even more in awe of what they do and will be the first to admit that I could not hack it for 1 day. I sure hope you guys get paid well for all you do.

      Here is a small list of just some of the things that I heard them doing over a 2 day period. Not to include all the extensions that they have to call for what I would guess is more stuff that needs to be done.

      Open Library, Open gift shop, Open Pharmacy, Open Safe at main desk, Open Safe for the day, Code Yellow on the psycho ward. ( Out of control patient ) Answer any alarms that go off, Make ID cards and swipe cards for new employees, Man the helo pad fire apparatus when the Med Flight comes and goes, Assist in the ER to control patients fighting the med staff and assume control of their valuables, Witness that the person that croaked was pronounced as stated on the toe tag, Routine parking lot control, Assist day surgery patients to their cars, Set up beds in rooms as needed, Escort unwanted people off property. I forgot to mention that there are 2 state prisons near by and they bring knuckle heads to the hospital often with all sorts of problems. The security guys have not once complained that they are to busy to answer the next call.

      This is just some of the things that I was able to copy down as I could. Hats off big time to you guys.
      Let's not forget: Blocking off the entire ER entrance for pressure washing (at 9pm in the middle of the week) or one half of the parking garage on a Friday night (the other half on Saturday). Calls for jump starts (which our hospital doesnt do so when they call we get cussed out). Find wheelchairs for the ER (not our job but if we don't do it noone will and they always go to one source to complain). Observe a Baker Act (person placed in state custody for mental evaluation; we set the known record this week with 33.5 hours.)

      The bad thing about the baker act is we only observe them while they are in the ER. Usually they are transfered to a MH facility. Sometimes they are admited to the hospital and the floor provides a sitter. The ER officer is usually the one that sits on them so we effectively lose the ER officer. (see record above!)

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      • #18
        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
        How do the "Betty Bearcat" books and such get frequency tables? Guessing, or field observation? Or does the other agency publish them?

        Field observation. There are specially allocated bands of frequencies for fed use only, i.e. 162.xxx through 173.xxx, but there is so much stuff there, guessing would be useless.

        Besides, most of the feds I know from work (3 letter agencies) all use Nextel.

        Comment


        • #19
          GCMC Your baker act is the same as our Section 12. The thing is that the person being observed can not be medicated while in custody because it would give a false outcome of their behaviour. Sorry if this offends anyone (NOT) but the local PD gets 911 calls from the Sec 12 unit with people stating that They are being held against their will and that there is a conspiracy against them. The PD has to respond irregardless to all and any 911 calls. The hospital does all they can to keep them away from phones but with all they have to do sometimes it slips through the cracks to lock or remove the phones.
          THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
          THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
          http://www.boondocksaints.com/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Chucky
            GCMC Your baker act is the same as our Section 12. The thing is that the person being observed can not be medicated while in custody because it would give a false outcome of their behaviour. Sorry if this offends anyone (NOT) but the local PD gets 911 calls from the Sec 12 unit with people stating that They are being held against their will and that there is a conspiracy against them. The PD has to respond irregardless to all and any 911 calls. The hospital does all they can to keep them away from phones but with all they have to do sometimes it slips through the cracks to lock or remove the phones.
            Here, we take the phones out of the room. They are put in a hospital gown and their personal items are put aside for safekeeping. They are not allowed any visitors except for thier doctor or a lawyer.

            That's how it's supposed to work. It's not perfect adn sometimes thenursing staff lets them get away with things and all we can do is lodge a complaint that usually gets ignored. There have been times that I have allowed a family member in to the room because it calms the person down. Anything to make my job easier.

            Also here, a LEO can place someone in a baker act and they drop them off and leave us with them. I feel if they baker act them they should provide the sitter in the ER but nope.

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            • #21
              Thanks!

              Thanks for the kudos from Hennepin County Medical Center Security in Minneapolis!
              Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by Chucky
                GCMC Your baker act is the same as our Section 12. The thing is that the person being observed can not be medicated while in custody because it would give a false outcome of their behaviour. Sorry if this offends anyone (NOT) but the local PD gets 911 calls from the Sec 12 unit with people stating that They are being held against their will and that there is a conspiracy against them. The PD has to respond irregardless to all and any 911 calls. The hospital does all they can to keep them away from phones but with all they have to do sometimes it slips through the cracks to lock or remove the phones.

                Luckily for us, we are 911, so we get all of those calls. We have 1 psych eval unit next to the ER, and 6 in-patient psych units. We weren't always 911, but after so many rediculous 911 calls to MPD, they suggested that we become 911 for our hospital.
                Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

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                • #23
                  Thanks to everyone for the kudos. I can speak from 3 years of experience. We have a saying at my facility "Their Worst Day Is Our Everyday" Burnout is very high. Your constantly dealing with homeless, overdoses, violent individuals, suicidals. I've had every type of body fluid known to man on me But I wouldn't be doing anything else. Once again guys its nice to see someone appreciates what we do!
                  "If everyone is thinking alike, someone isn't thinking."
                  - General George Patton Jr

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by sgtnewby
                    Luckily for us, we are 911, so we get all of those calls. We have 1 psych eval unit next to the ER, and 6 in-patient psych units. We weren't always 911, but after so many rediculous 911 calls to MPD, they suggested that we become 911 for our hospital.
                    You respond to 911 calls for police service? Wow, I've never heard of that before. Did they just reprogram 9-911 to dial the security office, or does the 911 dispatch center transfer all calls to the hospital security dispatcher?
                    Some Kind of Commando Leader

                    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by HospitalOfficer
                      Thanks to everyone for the kudos. I can speak from 3 years of experience. We have a saying at my facility "Their Worst Day Is Our Everyday" Burnout is very high. Your constantly dealing with homeless, overdoses, violent individuals, suicidals. I've had every type of body fluid known to man on me But I wouldn't be doing anything else. Once again guys its nice to see someone appreciates what we do!
                      emphasis mine

                      The sad thing is most the time it's not the hospital employees that we work for that appreciate what we do!

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
                        You respond to 911 calls for police service? Wow, I've never heard of that before. Did they just reprogram 9-911 to dial the security office, or does the 911 dispatch center transfer all calls to the hospital security dispatcher?
                        911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )
                        Last edited by sgtnewby; 04-22-2007, 10:38 PM.
                        Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          One of my hotels has a system when someone dials 9 (for an outside line) & 9-1-1 an alarm goes off at the switchboard letting us know.
                          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            Originally posted by sgtnewby
                            911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )
                            Unless people dial from their cell phones, of course, and then I presume the PD would then just notify you?
                            "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                            "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                            "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                            "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              Originally posted by SecTrainer
                              Unless people dial from their cell phones, of course, and then I presume the PD would then just notify you?
                              If they know the location of the person calling from the cell phone, I think they would, but I haven't come across that one yet.
                              Apparently a HUGE cop wannabe...

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by sgtnewby
                                911 here, no matter how you dial it, goes to us. If you need police, you need to dial 9 for an outside line and call their non-emergency line. The only 911 calls here that go to the police are if our dispatch calls 911 from their console. So if we need PD, our dispatch has to call them. The few pay phones here, about 4 of them, will call PD 911, but they just call our dispatch and notify us and we handle it unless PD really is needed. ( As my partner just said while reading this, "we are an odd duck" )

                                Our phone system is set up the same way, and it does significantly cut down on the number of nuisance calls to Police Dispatch from Psych patients.
                                Drew Neckar
                                Hospital Security Supervisor
                                ---------------------------------------------------

                                Always forgive your enemies--nothing annoys them so much.
                                --Oscar Wilde—

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