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  • Chucky
    replied
    Originally posted by mjw064 View Post
    And yeah, I might have some experience being on the wrong end of an investigation regarding photos which appeared on facebook ... imagine that.
    Oh mjw I forgot to tell you . Chris Hansen from Dateline called and wanted me to ask you if you would give him a call regarding the above. Thanks

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    You are in a position of authority. You can, and will, be attacked before clients, corporations, courts of civil law, and even courts of criminal law based on your character or lack of.

    You go and shoot someone in lawful self-defense. Next thing you know, the state is pulling up myspace photos of you with enough firepower to destroy the Earth and nice little comments about how you want to shoot people.

    Obviously, this is an attack on character to prove that you were gunning to kill.

    It gets worse.

    A client is shown photos of you being a complete failure at life by the "nice family you're tormenting." Your character is in question now.

    Even worse is when the client or company is shown photos of you engaging in unsafe or unlawful activities. Guess what? You're a liability.

    If nothing else, you are stupid enough to post things for the entire world to see without thought. What else, btw, will you post?

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    I put nothing online that I wouldn't want to come out in a court of law. It's like the old saying, never write anything in a letter that you wouldn't want to see printed on the front page of the newspaper.

    On the other hand, I'm both abrasive and congenitally honest (though I escape a punch in the mouth because I'm often funny). So, here's some quotes for the prosecution:

    Many of my customers are dumb.

    A small but disturbing minority of my customers are perverts.

    I hate people who drive a Prius.

    I think hippies should be smacked repeatedly with a rolled up newspaper.

    Global warming... I'm against it. Except during the winter.

    I like trans fats. Sometimes, I order a hamburger with fries and a Coke, and I ask for a little cup of trans fats on the side. I suck it up with a straw. Yummy.

    I think we could legalize some of the weaker narcotics.

    The punishment for an athlete caught using performance enhancing drugs? Immidiate reassignment to a balet troupe. They can return to the game after one season of preformances.

    I like to drink alcohol sometimes.

    I no longer smoke, but people who try to ban smoking need a swift kick in the nuts.

    Everfocus sucks.

    Bosch sucks.

    Sony sucks.

    On occasion, my language can get a little "blue". And by "on occasion" I mean "often" and by "blue" I mean "like a sailor with Tourrete's syndrome".

    Some- hell, most Democrats are cool, but overall, liberals suck.

    Also, most of the Angry Left regularly provide aid and comfort to the enemy in time of war and should be hung by the neck until dead. This country would be a better place.

    Homosexuality is a sin... but so is working on the Sabbath. The government should never be in the business of legislating morality.

    Red Sox suck.

    Freedom of speech is awesome. Even when morons exercise it.

    We should bring back capital punishment. And flogging. I draw the line at tars and feathers, though.

    Soccer sucks.

    I am not a racist or a bigot. I hate all morons equally. If you can do your job, I don't much care what you look like.

    There, now I'll never get elected President.

    Leave a comment:


  • copelandamuffy
    replied
    Originally posted by davis002 View Post
    How do you use it as an investigative resource? I can see someone using it to stalk that cute bartender that goes to the local college, but any real investigative purpose???, I don't see it. I'm a licensed private investigator, so feel free to cue me in on the secret

    Our bartender where the wife and I socialize is in his mid-fifties, could lose about 30 pounds, dumpy looking, going bald, and smokes cigars. He aint cute

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by TACTICAL 785 View Post
    See I think its stupid, the employers would do that. what business of it is there what you do with your friends on your off time. So what if you have pictures of you passed out and someone staking beers cups on you...

    At least they know your a fun person...
    Depends on who you work for. Don't know how this works for private workers, but for public workers those social sites can be bad news. This was sent to everyone in my Department by the Chief.
    ------------------

    http://www.lyongorsky.com/articles/art-apr2008.html

    Articles

    By Chris Livingston
    Reprinted from “The Shield,” the official publication
    of the Dallas Police Association
    April 2008

    FREE SPEECH, FACEBOOK, MYSPACE AND MY POLICE JOB

    People will post just about anything on Facebook and MySpace. One of my favorites is this quote: “Don’t like the police…call a crack head the next time you need help!” One Texan posted this: “I’m not an alcoholic, I’m a drunkaholic.” Unfortunately for this Texas, he was involved in an injury accident and charged with DUI. The prosecutor’s job was all too easy once the jury saw the “drunkaholic” statement from his MySpace page. Yes, attorneys and employers are checking your page. And not just for articles like this one.

    On February 28, 2008, Brady Lewis, a police dispatcher in Anderson, Indiana was placed on administrative leave because “profanity, racially charged words and language that might be offensive to woman” was found on his MySpace page. Lewis was also a reserve police officer in a neighboring town. He was immediately asked to turn in his badge. None of his comments directly involved his position as a police dispatcher or reserve officer, but both departments found his conduct “unbecoming.” Lewis claimed that he only meant the page for friends and had marked his profile as private. Furthermore, he asserted a First Amendment right to post humor on his page. Lewis’ appeals fell on deaf ears. The Chief of Police succinctly stated, “I was shocked a little bit [upon viewing the page]. It’s not my kind of humor.”

    Police officers need to be aware of the fine line between protected speech and a statement that will send you to Internal Affairs; even an internet statement on MySpace or Facebook.

    In Garcetti v. Ceballos, 126 S. Ct. 1951 (2006), the United States Supreme Court held that “when public employees make statements pursuant to their official duties, the employees are not speaking as citizens for First Amendment purposes, and the Constitution does not insulate their communications from employer discipline.” Under Garcetti, police officers’ complaints about working conditions or a supervisor is not protected speech. In fact, the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals recently upheld disciplinary action against a University of Texas employee because the “speech” the employee engaged in was nothing more than “a personal grievance about his wages.” These statements should not be made to the media and are best left off you’re my Space page – even if the page is marked private.

    A famous Supreme Court Justice once stated that a police officer “may have a constitutional right to talk politics, but he has no constitutional right to be a policeman.” McAuliffe v. Mayor of New Bedford, 29 N.E. 517, 517 (Mass. 1892). Remember you have no constitutional right to be a police officer. When you post on the internet be yourself, but avoid obvious negatives. Do not post that Sergeant Blockhead and Mayor Gumby are idiots. Do not post that you hate your department or that you hate the citizen Kane. Also avoid posting sleazy or drunken photos; especially ones where anyone is even partly in uniform – your partner will thank you later. It may help to ask yourself whether you would want your mother, priest, pastor, son or daughter to see your site. You may not even want to admit homosexuality or extreme political or religious views. Instead, use your MySpace or Facebook page affirmatively to build visibility and credibility as an expert in police work or your hobby. Also consider joining more “serious” networking sites to help you in future job searches.

    Remember your MySpace or Facebook page might be used against you.

    __________________________________________________ ____________

    Chris Livingston is an attorney with Lyon, Gorsky, Haring & Gilbert, L.L.P., 3131 McKinney Avenue, Suite 100, Dallas, Texas 75204; 888/711-2583, website: LyonGorsky.com email Chris at [email protected].

    Leave a comment:


  • TACTICAL 785
    replied
    See I think its stupid, the employers would do that. what business of it is there what you do with your friends on your off time. So what if you have pictures of you passed out and someone staking beers cups on you...

    At least they know your a fun person...

    Leave a comment:


  • CameraMan
    replied
    MySpace is an open network, so everyone can see everyone else's information. MySpace also seems to attract a dumber element, and so there is more useful information there.

    On a personal level, I hate MySpace with a passion. Someone once asked me why I don't have a MySpace account. I find myself talking to that person less and less.

    Leave a comment:


  • Minneapolis Security
    replied
    Originally posted by dla4079 View Post
    Facebook and MySpace are ok, but too many wierdos on there...lol. There are only two "social networks" I am a part of:

    PoliceLink

    -and-

    The Correctional Officer Network
    There are weirdos on there as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • dla4079
    replied
    Facebook and MySpace are ok, but too many wierdos on there...lol. There are only two "social networks" I am a part of:

    PoliceLink

    -and-

    The Correctional Officer Network

    Leave a comment:


  • mjw064
    replied
    Originally posted by gixxer32404 View Post
    I see very little info on facebook.On myspace I see their friends, status, age,location,and sometimes phone numbers. I see millions of pictures.
    Ok, all that and much more is on facebook. You must not be looking at the info page ... just the wall.

    Leave a comment:


  • gixxer32404
    replied
    see my new thread about craigslist

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Any social site where people choose to publish information about themselves is not only a perfectly legitimate source of information about them, but also many times about their employers and other organizations that they belong to and talk about. Ditto, blogs. A significant percentage of employers now use various Web search protocols to check on applicants, to monitor their corporate reputation, etc. Prosecutors use Web searches especially in the sentencing phase of trials, sometimes finding things that have caused the defendant to be treated much more harshly (yes, people bragging about their crime or showing photos/videos of themselves drunk at a party while awaiting sentencing on a DUI/vehicular homicide charge).

    Of course, anything found by such methods must be independently verified because people also exaggerate, lie, distort, etc.

    Moral: It's not terribly smart to post anything about yourself, your lifestyle or your work that you wouldn't want ANYONE from your mother to your boss to the police to a corporate spy to see.

    Oh, and if you steal stuff don't fence it on Ebay or Craig's List.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 10-12-2008, 02:07 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • gixxer32404
    replied
    Originally posted by mjw064 View Post
    Facebook is 1,000,000,000 times more informative than myspace.
    And yes, I am on Facebook. It is a great social networking tool.
    I see very little info on facebook.On myspace I see their friends, status, age,location,and sometimes phone numbers. I see millions of pictures.

    Leave a comment:


  • mjw064
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec View Post
    The problem that I run into most often is that the majority of people are now keeping their Facebooks private and will not add someone who is not a friend. The renders it basically useless.

    I know that I will check for Facebook pages of potential hires. I believe that a lot of human resources departments do the same thing. Pictures of you passed out with your buddies stacking beer cups on you might be amusing to your friends, but it doesn't say much to a potential employer.

    I have heard of other investigators using the social networking sites as an investigative tool.
    It depends on your network too. For instance I am a Grad Student at GW, thus I can see the profile of basically anyone else on the GW network.

    The "New Facebook" allows users to determine what individual other users can and cannot see though. It's because of people like CorpSec who use the photo's against us. And yeah, I might have some experience being on the wrong end of an investigation regarding photos which appeared on facebook ... imagine that.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    The problem that I run into most often is that the majority of people are now keeping their Facebooks private and will not add someone who is not a friend. The renders it basically useless.

    I know that I will check for Facebook pages of potential hires. I believe that a lot of human resources departments do the same thing. Pictures of you passed out with your buddies stacking beer cups on you might be amusing to your friends, but it doesn't say much to a potential employer.

    I have heard of other investigators using the social networking sites as an investigative tool.

    Leave a comment:

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