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  • Security Question

    If a waitress at the restaurant that you are working in comes up to you, and informs you that she has been repeatedly harassed by one of the customers, what would you do?

  • #2
    Originally posted by JL_7
    If a waitress at the restaurant that you are working in comes up to you, and informs you that she has been repeatedly harassed by one of the customers, what would you do?
    Since your question is vague my answers are only speculative to hypothetical situations. Accordingly:

    it depends on who is allegedly harassing her. If it is another employee, she must go to management and needs to do so immeidately.

    If it is a customer, then I would most likely address the suspect depending on the nature of the alleged harassment.

    Some claims of harassment may be such that it boils down to nothing more than a personality conflict or that one person called the other person a name they didn't like. Thus, it may be rectified by simply having the waitress avoid the person all together.

    Still there are also times when claims of harassment are actually deeply rooted in domestic violence or divorse / child custody issues and thus, you are stepping right smack into the middle of a mine field if you get too involved that will nail you every time and make matters worse.

    Therefore, to be safe, I would not engage the suspect until I directly witnessed him or her actively harassing the waitress, so as to obstruct or prevent her from doing her job or working in a non-hostile environment.

    By doing this, I establish better grounds for my contact and any orders I may give to stop the conduct, and therein avoid any potential legal issues / allegations. Likewise, it helps to prevent the situation exploding even more.

    If on the other hand, the waitress reports conduct of a serious nature, for example there are issues of physical violence, hostile approaches, threats or intimidation tactics and so on. Then I would address the suspect so as to gain immediate control over the matter and de-esclate such, and ask them to leave the property for the safety of everyone involved.
    Last edited by Christopherstjo; 04-10-2007, 03:19 AM.

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    • #3
      If they state they have been "repeatedly" harrased i would ask what happened and when. I would then observe the person in question and if he/she attempts to anything hostile then i would approach the person and politely ask them to leave as there is just cause as there has been a complaint then i see the person not obiding by the rules the person must leave. If he refuses i threaten the person with a $550 fail to leave trespass fine if he remains there from my experiance to grab the suspect or physically touch him is the wrong thing to do and will make the situation worse so i will try and have a chat with him perhaps while making sure there are other guards around.

      If the person still fails to leave and acts rudely i am then given no choice and will physically eject him/her from the premises. Though i take a employee and normal patron complaint the same and if a normal patron made a similar complaint i would of acted in exactly the same way.

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      • #4
        Ask her to advise her Manager of the situation.
        Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
        Groucho Marx

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Eric
          Ask her to advise her Manager of the situation.

          what will the manager do? Just come and tell security anyway....securitys job is to take care of these situations.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by joecolerulz
            what will the manager do? Just come and tell security anyway....securitys job is to take care of these situations.
            You don't want to be doing stuff without the manager's approval. Depending on the site ( I have never worked security for a restraunt), there may be things you can or cannot do. Ive worked sites where we had authority to trespass people, Ive also worked sites where it was entirely a management issue.

            When you get the approval or guidance of the manager to take action, you have a lot more behind you than if you just decide to gung-ho it alone.
            "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
            "The Curve" 1998

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            • #7
              well normally you would speak to the manager before your shift has begun and informs you how strict he is etc and what he expects of you and then if one person is hostile and is harrasing patrons he should be ejected. If problems continue to occur the police would then be called.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by joecolerulz
                what will the manager do? Just come and tell security anyway....securitys job is to take care of these situations.
                Based on the limited information available from the original posting, I would get the Manager involved to cover my butt, what is wrong with that?
                What if the Waitress was the problem and redirecting blame for some other cause?

                The role of Security is not always "to take care of these situations" by jumping into the fire.
                Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                Groucho Marx

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Eric
                  Based on the limited information available from the original posting, I would get the Manager involved to cover my butt, what is wrong with that?
                  What if the Waitress was the problem and redirecting blame for some other cause?

                  The role of Security is not always "to take care of these situations" by jumping into the fire.

                  Thats why i would observe the person she is making the accusations at and if there is just cause and he looks intoxicated and troublesome more then likely he did what the waitress said.

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                  • #10
                    Outstanding Answers

                    Thank you all very much for your input in regards to the above security question. Each one of you was professional in your answers, and kept in mind the liability aspects, and possable allegations of the incident.

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                    • #11
                      Out of curiosity, what sort of resturant has a security presence?

                      Does the establishment sell alcohol?

                      Are you a bouncer?
                      The views expressed here are mine and do not reflect the official opinion of my employer or the organization through which the Internet was accessed.

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                      • #12
                        Most restaurants attached to hotels have security or if its a real high class well known one it may aswell.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by EMTjon
                          Out of curiosity, what sort of resturant has a security presence?

                          Does the establishment sell alcohol?

                          Are you a bouncer?
                          Hotel restaurants, shopping mall restaurants etc
                          I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                          Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                          • #14
                            I've worked security at a restaurant or two that is open all night, and has trouble with drunks coming in after the bars close.

                            I also worked at a restaurant/bar, that could be a hot spot at times. All depends on circumstances which justify security.

                            Part of your job is to keep an eye on EVERYBODY. I'm sorry to say, but a lot of harassment complaints I received, I came to find out it was the employee who started the trouble.

                            I usually tell the employee to go on about their job, and I'd keep an eye open. If the situation persists, then I'll step in and handle it. Usually just your mere presence will put a stop to such behavior.

                            I've had to tell more than one waitress or bartender I am not their damned watch dog, so don't think they can say "sic 'em" and I'll act without assessing the situation first.
                            Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by EMTjon
                              Out of curiosity, what sort of resturant has a security presence?

                              Does the establishment sell alcohol?

                              Are you a bouncer?
                              Here in Houston, like many large cities, the crime rate is fairly high, but unlike other places, the crime is not confined to certain areas if the city. Especially muggings, "push-ins", etc.

                              I have never seen as many security officers at restaurants as I have here. Many are off-duty LE's. We have an acquaintance that was followed into a men's room at an upscale restaurant in an upscale area, had his head slammed forward into the wall as he was standing at the urinal. They took his wallet and watch. It happens all the time, apparently.
                              Richard Dickinson
                              Dickinson Security Management Group, LLC
                              DSMG Provides a Variety of Software Products and Consulting Services to the Contract Security Industry
                              www.hrdickinson.com

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