Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Vending machine breakins

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Vending machine breakins

    We are having a rash of breakins into our Coke machines in the hallways on the floors of the downtown hotel. We have padlocks covering the built in locks on the doors of the machines. They are cutting the hasps & pulling the locks. We do regular patrols & the machines are emptied often. The thefts are getting out of hand. There was so many that Pepsi pulled their machines & we had to switch to Coke. At the begining the Coke machines oly accepted tokens that the guests had to stand in line at the front desk to buy. There was lots of complaints & sales went way down. We changed to coin operated again. Any ideas of how we can stop these thefts? Upper management wants unmonitored cameras. We try to tell them that cameras do not prevent this type of crime. I'm thinking more along the lines of some type of alarm that will be set off when a machine is opened. Any suggestions?
    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

  • #2
    An alarm sounds like a good idea... But keep in mind, in a hotel setting... If these break-ins are occurring at night, and that alarm goes off... You're gonna get a lot of sudden noise complaints..

    On the flipside though, you'll probably also get a lot of upset people stepping out their door to see wtf is going on, and possibly getting a look at the offender... So it may give you witnesses as well...
    Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
    Shoulda called in sick.
    Be safe!

    Comment


    • #3
      Maybe a pager type alarm system along with a camera. At least if you can't get there in time when you get the page, you will know what time the breakin happened. Save searching hours of camera recordings.
      http://www.microframecorp.com/page/M...FQGPWAodbQLZWg

      Comment


      • #4
        They are coming out w/ vending machines that only accept credit or debit cards. I have read that the machines are stopping vending machine theft.

        About a month ago we had someone stuffing paper towels up the coin return. There was about $20 worth of change up there... fortunately the vending machine employee caught it first. Has anyone else had that problem?

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by HCSecurity

          About a month ago we had someone stuffing paper towels up the coin return. There was about $20 worth of change up there... fortunately the vending machine employee caught it first. Has anyone else had that problem?
          That was the big thing to do when I was a kid. Didnt know people still did that.
          "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
          "The Curve" 1998

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by HotelSecurity
            We are having a rash of breakins into our Coke machines in the hallways on the floors of the downtown hotel. We have padlocks covering the built in locks on the doors of the machines. They are cutting the hasps & pulling the locks. We do regular patrols & the machines are emptied often. The thefts are getting out of hand. There was so many that Pepsi pulled their machines & we had to switch to Coke. At the begining the Coke machines oly accepted tokens that the guests had to stand in line at the front desk to buy. There was lots of complaints & sales went way down. We changed to coin operated again. Any ideas of how we can stop these thefts? Upper management wants unmonitored cameras. We try to tell them that cameras do not prevent this type of crime. I'm thinking more along the lines of some type of alarm that will be set off when a machine is opened. Any suggestions?
            Hotel Security you said "Upper management wants unmonitored cameras." Has this Upper Management discussed this option with legal counsel? The legal problems encountered could be awesome. The other forum who have responded have some very good ideas. Float them and see what happens.
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill

            Comment


            • #7
              Ok, first, who owns the vending machines? The hotel, or a vendor? You'd need permission from the vendor to install any type of alarm.

              Second, it takes under a minute to defeat these machines if they're pulling locks. It sounds like you've got some professional coin thieves. A camera will not deter them, because they know its unmanned. They might even defeat the camera before hitting the machine!

              The fact they're bringing lock pullers and bolt cutters out indicates these aren't idiots.

              If they are your machines, invest in the round high-security locks that encapsulate the shackle. It will slow them down, but not defeat them. This will give you time to either buy a cage for each machine with a round high-security lock (that will make it not worth it), alarm the things with an internal alarm (don't use external, they'll just defeat the damn thing), or switch to cashless machines.
              Some Kind of Commando Leader

              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

              Comment


              • #8
                I think they should install more Vendo 475 machines.
                The following is from an article of one of many deaths related to tipping coke machines.

                "A good portion of this Report is devoted to explaining the internal working mechanisms of the Vendo 475. It was known to be faulty — when tipped past a certain angle, it yielded a can of Coca-Cola. The students at Bishop's were well aware of this, had in fact been observed by the school janitor tipping it in the Kuehner Hall Lobby for just that purpose. However, on the morning that Kevin was found dead underneath it, there were no loose pop cans. Why not? According to Dr. Belanger's Report, the odds of this happening are 128:1 (2 to the 7th). Kevin Mackle was unlucky enough to shake the machine at a moment when it would never yield a can. A unique situation, no doubt presented to Dr. Belanger by some smooth talker from the Vendo Company, who accepted it unquestioningly. There is no similar mention of these statistics in any other Report on such deaths and injuries that we have read."
                THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A 911 CALL IS FOUR MINUTES
                THE AVERAGE RESPONSE TIME FOR A .357 MAGNUM ROUND IS 1400 FEET PER SECOND?
                http://www.boondocksaints.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Thanks guys. I've had experiences in the past with auditable alarms. They are sort of like car alarms. Guests will open their doors to see why the alarm is ringing, usually about 10 minutes after it has started ringing. I also did some research on the internet & Nathan also mentioned it, cages. I also found that some places put a door outside the area where the machines are located & it takes a guest key card to open it.

                  I originally was interested in the type of alarm that would set off a pager that we could carry. Has anyone used this tyoe of system?

                  As for the tipping of machines. This was about 5 years ago & happened at Bishop's University not far from Montreal. All the machines now have a sign on them warning that you can be killed if you tip them.

                  We have never had the blocking the coin slot with paper trick but 2 years ago (when Pepsi pulled their machines) we had a guy "fishing" in the machines. He would take a lighter & melt a 2" long hole in the plastic in front of the machines. He would then insert a magnet tied to a string. He would lower it into the coin box. Canadian $1.00 & $2.00 coins can be picked up with a magnet. He was pulling out $50.00 easily from every machine he broke into. (We caught him one day).
                  I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                  Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    We had similar incidents happening in our area. What we did was put cameras up, place signage of camera use on the machines and eventually put them in cages. Cages are the best.

                    We had people cutting locks and then the people who were bashing out the bill acceptors and taking the cash.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      We have our Difib box's (and some doors after hours)wired to pagers, but that goes through our security system. If going that route, be sure to see how long it will take to get the page, it could be 30-60 seconds. It does not sound like much time unless you are in the opposite corner of the building.

                      Years ago I remember someone stuffing the condom dispenser so the product would not come out, then coming back a day or 2 later for the "supplies".

                      Guess this is not happening on the floors you need a card to enter via the elevator....

                      With winter nearing the end it may be harder to hide the needed break in equipment.

                      Can you check with a few nearby stores to alert them? The money must be spent somewhere.
                      Last edited by Eric; 03-30-2007, 10:23 AM.
                      Quote me as saying I was mis-quoted.
                      Groucho Marx

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Yea, check nearby companies who use coin counting machines such as Coin Star. The police did this when laundry mat coin machines were getting broken into, noticed the same guys cashing coin star vouchers with LOTS of quarters on them and ended up busting them.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by LPCap
                          Yea, check nearby companies who use coin counting machines such as Coin Star. The police did this when laundry mat coin machines were getting broken into, noticed the same guys cashing coin star vouchers with LOTS of quarters on them and ended up busting them.
                          When we had a rash of vending machine break ins at a private college we did security for, first thing I did was canvassed the nearby C-Stores, and asked the clerk on duty if anyone had tried to unload a lot of change. One said that one sure did; said she had a "bucketfull" of it, and that she had won it in a poker game. A description of her and the two guys she was with lead to an arrest.
                          Never make a drummer mad; we beat things for a living!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            While in Florida this week I saw two young girls, (about 12 years old), trying to get money out of an ATM using a library card. They were hard at work and noticed me watching them and, acting like they were caught, quickly left. As they were leaving I told them - you know the bank has your pictures now.
                            Retail Security Consultant / Expert Witness
                            Co-Author - Effective Security Management 6th Edition

                            Contributor to Retail Crime, Security and Loss Prevention: An Encyclopedic Reference

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Probably read it on the internet... I wonder if their library card even had a magstripe.

                              There was a rash of "secret hacks" for stand-alone ATMs of a certain maker, basically... You would enter admin mode, tell it that 20 = 1000, and then ask it for 20 dollars. It would spit out a grand, and you'd make 980 dollars. This was corrected after, of course, it made the internet and maybe even mainstream media.

                              These are the types of units that go in five and dimes in the less nice parts of town, so the convince clerk isn't going to care, and its normal to wear a hoodie.
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                              Comment

                              Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X