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DOL's regulatory powers and inspectors.

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  • S/O245
    replied
    yeah just for id purposes not to be a butt head to them or anything. But if i had someone on my post and even if they did show some id or so me being on 3rd shift i would go and have PD respond just incase so they could check them out. You never know you can buy badges from quartermaster even if your not a S/O you can buy a badge that says security officer lol. I have even seen a story where a guy in clevland was selling replica police badges and at the time it was legal. the only problem was he was puttin badge numbers on them. They look real and they even located a CPD Officer with a badge number on this replica badge. The local news in city of clevland even bought 2 of the badges from him and avg citizens thought they were LEOs when they flashed them for a example. I think Ohio since then had passed some emergency law against maming badges that look real with badge numbers. What i would do is also ask to see a commission id card kinda like our state S/O license. But if they ask me for id i got plenty. Ohio Drivers License my ohio s/o license, ohio ccw license. LOL I got enough ids i think.

    Well about time to suit up. I work tonight and off tomorrow. I got pretty lucky i get dec 24th off. Stay Safe All

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    I know of an officer who called the police to supervise.

    The inspector was armed on his Division of Licensing badge. They pulled his gun, and called Tallahassee to find out why he was armed. They were ready to arrest him.

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  • Echos13
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    In the state of Florida, they're investigating not who you are, or if your "legitimate" or not, they're investigating if you are adhering to Florida Statue 493. This is why they demand your State Security Officer's License, State Firearm's Permit, and Company ID. All three are required to be on your immediate person while on duty with a firearm, and the SO License and Company ID if without weapon.

    The state of Florida requires that you cooperate with the investigator only so much as it pertains to Florida State Statute 493. What we were taught to do with State Inspectors was to immediately demand their state identification, then call a supervisor to the scene. Until they produce identification, they are suspect.

    There are reports of Division of Licensing inspectors attempting to overstep their authority, for whatever reason. Unreasonable requests such as, "Draw your weapon and give it to me to inspect your bullets." The client requires armed security on the property. To disarm yourself, remove the rounds from your weapon, and hand them to a state employee to "check" is a safety risk to the public, to the client, and to yourself.

    The State of Florida does not regulate paperwork or post orders. Such requests must be cleared through company supervision, especially as you are under a confidentaility requirement with your client and company. If the state investigator truly needs to see those documents, he can subpoena them.
    As I pretty much suspected; all of what you stated. It was some time ago and I pretty much was on the side lines. Indeed, I am sure this person was ID'd and confirmed. I happen to recall this the other night while watching a PBS production on spy planes and for some reason it just popped into my head. I was just wondering if anyone have had any dealings with it. I think they are needed. But like anything the "state" does it seems they push it to the evelope these days.

    "Draw your weapon and give it to me to inspect your bullets." Not on my watch buckeroo.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    In the state of Florida, they're investigating not who you are, or if your "legitimate" or not, they're investigating if you are adhering to Florida Statue 493. This is why they demand your State Security Officer's License, State Firearm's Permit, and Company ID. All three are required to be on your immediate person while on duty with a firearm, and the SO License and Company ID if without weapon.

    The state of Florida requires that you cooperate with the investigator only so much as it pertains to Florida State Statute 493. What we were taught to do with State Inspectors was to immediately demand their state identification, then call a supervisor to the scene. Until they produce identification, they are suspect.

    There are reports of Division of Licensing inspectors attempting to overstep their authority, for whatever reason. Unreasonable requests such as, "Draw your weapon and give it to me to inspect your bullets." The client requires armed security on the property. To disarm yourself, remove the rounds from your weapon, and hand them to a state employee to "check" is a safety risk to the public, to the client, and to yourself.

    The State of Florida does not regulate paperwork or post orders. Such requests must be cleared through company supervision, especially as you are under a confidentaility requirement with your client and company. If the state investigator truly needs to see those documents, he can subpoena them.

    Leave a comment:


  • S/O245
    replied
    I never heard of state people coming to posts. But they may do that in Ohio also i dont know. But I would think also since they ask for your id's i.ie your driver lic and state security officer licensed that you can ask for his/her id to to make sure they are for real. As a Security Officer at any post if you have someone suspicous etc on property i would think in ur state its ok to ask to see id. LOL a State Investigator or what ever might not like it but hey S/O's have a job to do to.

    Stay Safe All

    Leave a comment:


  • Echos13
    started a topic DOL's regulatory powers and inspectors.

    DOL's regulatory powers and inspectors.

    I have always wondered about the state?s people who check on security companies. Has anyone ever had an experienced with these state inspectors? I have heard some pretty way out stories about these guys. I know they visit regular posts from time to time and make surprise visits to the main offices as well. Checking for up to date license and proper ID cards, etc. These people seem to be spread pretty thin around here but I hear they are relatively strict. Before I came on with my present company I had a part time job about 10 years ago at a power plant under construction and they showed up unannounced. They checked our license, ID card and wanted to see our post orders and even our paper work. Just how much power do these people have? I thought it was a little intrusive to request a look at reports and documents that I assumed where protected by the companies (client) right to privacy? I check the state's website from time to time and read all the complaints, fines and suspisions that are made. I see a lot of big name firms as well as the litte ones. Not to mention individuals who got the boot or fined. Who regulates your state and what powers of action do they have?

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