Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Police Officer In Trouble Calls

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • EMTGuard
    replied
    If I saw a cop getting his butt kicked along the fence line of our plant I'd have my partner cll 911 and I'd wade in to help out. Other than that there's little chance of me knowing about an officer in trouble. We don't patrol outside the plant and the LEOs switched to encripted comms about a year ago. You can't hear them on scanners anymore.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mall Director
    replied
    My memory is failing me, but just in case..

    I dont know if I responded yet on this one, but it's not uncommon once your department recieves recognition from your local LE agency, to be called to assist.

    I think this last year our department recieved a good 20 assistance calls from our LEO dispatch center. Most were 911 hang-up calls, this way PD did not have to waste manpower to respond as they are required to clear the locations. But we have recieved a few interesting ones.

    One comes to mind of a PD officer who stopped two car loads of subjects involved in an altercation. Seconds later, the PD dispatch center contacted our emergency line and requested assistance to the PD officers location to assist on our property. Once we arrived in our numbers, we fully understood the situation. The PD officer was outnumbered greatly and the situation was not de-escilating any time soon. When it was all said and done and we did our part to help, the PD officer had reported that his nearest back-up was more then 10 minutes away, and knew our response time was measured in seconds. This was the greatest feeling to myself and my personnel, that when it came down to it, and some help in a bad situation would really be needed, the PD could rely on us without a doubt to come and assist! The relief in his eyes when we rolled up was worth a million dollars!

    And by god, we would have done it again regardless of the odds!

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    This is an interesting question. I do a visual check when I roll by a police car on a stop when on or off duty. If the officer was obviously in a fight with someone, I would jump out and assist however I could.

    I have had situations where I was with the police already when things went south and then we all just piled on the guy.

    As far as actually "responding" to officer in distress calls, that gets really tricky. I suppose if I was driving down the road and somehow got information that an officer was in a knock down drag out fight a few blocks away, I would head there.

    I know a lot of the the officers personally and if it was one of them calling for help, I would definitely go a little further in my response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    down here

    I have had one or two incidents working in government project homes where I have had to assist the local PD. The officers were not overwhelmed by force, just numbers. A group of punk kids were outside being loud and causing a nuisance and became very belligerent and hostile when PD approached. Our 3 officers patrolling all walked up to give the officers the little extra show of force they needed. Another time, my patrol unit was called in to assist at a local bar. The officer had gotten in too deep and needed a little help. He had about four thugs trying to relieve him of his weapon. In both of these situations, the cops were very appreciative of our presence. It works both ways though. In another instance, I was working on a construction site unarmed and heard something going on in one of my buildings. I radioed patrol to send me some help and then I heard gunfire. I drove my truck over to where the local cops had an intersection blocked and informed them who I was and that I had just heard gunfire. Six officersb showed up within minutes to end what was apparently drug trafficking gone bad.

    Leave a comment:


  • Curtis Baillie
    replied
    I once was asked to bring another officer toilet paper. He had a bad attack of the runs and only made it as far as a wooded area. It really was funny.

    Leave a comment:


  • flashlightcop509
    replied
    I always listen to my portable scanner while at work, for 2 things mainly; 1) If they happen to put out a BOL for vehicle, and I see this vehicle before the PD does, I can call dispatch and update them on the last seen area and direction of travel. 2) We frequently have 911 hangup up here calls that the police are dispatched to; 90% of the time they are because of phone line glitches, and a lot of those originate from units on our properties. The 2 Constables and quite a few of the Troopers are happy when they show up to check it out and I or another Officer are waiting at the unit with the Master keys to let them in without having to boot a door down...

    Leave a comment:


  • Hank1
    replied
    Many times....Per the LEO's request often times. The LEO would ask that their Dispatch center call ours and ask us to 10-56 (meet me at....) and discuss criminal activtiy in the area, problem residents (nuisance calls). We even exchange our personal phone numbers. Depending on the squad, "A" shift or "B" shift, we will assist them on traffic stops of a vehicle with numerous occupants (just as a overwatch officer) until they get their back up on scene or until they clear the stop altogether. I would say 90 percent of Police Officers/Deputies know who we are and what we contribute to society. Many LEOs search us out for assistance. You better know what your doing when they request assistance!!!!! Under any and all circumstances.

    Be safe,

    Hank

    Leave a comment:


  • Arff312
    replied
    My patrol company has an awesome relation ship with the local PD. We get called by them all the time to handle Domestics ,Physical fights Etc... On our properties. Most of the officers know when they see our units we are highly trained and very professional. We do stop to help the police when needed . They have on more then one occasion been very thankful of this. I am not saying that we have a scanner in the cars that we respond to there calls , But we will stop if they are outnumbered and standby or help in fights etc. My company is all about public safety and we don't drive our car with the company name past an incident. That is bad publicity when someone says yea i was getting my Butt kicked and XYZ security saw and kept going.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by DMS 525
    I'll have to admit, they were quite prompt in responding to some hairy situations I've had to handle. It's when we have someone detained when they seem to take forever to show up.
    It's all about call priority. When I worked in LP, and would call the police after a shoplifting apprehension, if they were busy, the dispatcher might ask, "Are they in custody? Are they causing any problems?" If the suspect was in custody and cooperative, the call would be given a lower priority and we might have to wait a bit.

    Unless it was a Friday or Saturday, though, the police would often be there in no more than 15 minutes.

    Leave a comment:


  • DMS 525
    replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy
    Ehm... that the whole point of the original poster's question. We're talking about assisting police officers who are radioing for assistance if they are in trouble. Multiple subjects at gunpoint, fighting with a subject(s), wounded, etc.

    The big question is, how do they react to us (as security officers) assisting?

    There are many examples of concerned citizens assisting police officers in trouble. As long as you go about it with common sense, I think few police officers would have trouble with you helping them if they really need it.
    I'll have to admit, they were quite prompt in responding to some hairy situations I've had to handle. It's when we have someone detained when they seem to take forever to show up.

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by BoxerGuard
    Thats a bad idea. Just stay out of the Cop's way. If he looks like he is in trouble then help him
    Ehm... that the whole point of the original poster's question. We're talking about assisting police officers who are radioing for assistance if they are in trouble. Multiple subjects at gunpoint, fighting with a subject(s), wounded, etc.

    The big question is, how do they react to us (as security officers) assisting?

    There are many examples of concerned citizens assisting police officers in trouble. As long as you go about it with common sense, I think few police officers would have trouble with you helping them if they really need it.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    I've never seen hand signals used in LE except in SWAT-type operations, but I've heard there are some signals that are used by the staff in certain special venues like mental hospitals.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-17-2007, 11:07 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Guest's Avatar
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by LPGuy
    I'll also add: if you think your assistance may be needed, ask the police officer if he's code four. He'll let you know if he needs your help. You can also use the universal hand signal--just cruise by and hold up four fingers. If you get the same signal in response the officer is okay. Obviously you may not be able to do this if the officer is fighting with a subject...
    Thats a bad idea. Just stay out of the Cop's way. If he looks like he is in trouble then help him

    Leave a comment:


  • Bill Warnock
    replied
    There are duress codes, sign and counter-sign that may be used in some agencies. These are agency driven and careful in their use.
    Enjoy the day,
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • LPGuy
    replied
    Originally posted by Black Caesar
    With the town I live in, Code 4 means lights and sirens, Code 6 is no assistance needed. Next town over, they have no code 4 (Code 3 is lights and sirens). Dallas PD's Code 4 does mean disregard, after an instruction was given. If you didn't give any instructions, code 4 is meaningless. The Dallas Sheriff's office (where I worked as a jail guard) doesn't used signal codes at all.

    I've been a cop for 10 years (this December) with 2 agencies (a small town and a college), and a civilian employee for 2 more before that (a sheriff and a hospital PD) and I've never ever seen anyone use a hand signal like you describe. Maybe it's a thing where you are.
    Ah, I stand corrected then. Thank you. I guess it isn't as widely used as I thought.

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X