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  • #16
    Originally posted by SEO_09
    I know that Maryland has strict controls on Private Security, Similar to those in Virginia, so I do not know how you have been in the industry for a long amount of time and have not been weeded out. The perfession may not be as glamourous as what the pubilc has made Public law enforcement out to be, but there is a serious need out there for these professionals, and I for one have always held myself and other officers that I worked with to a high professional standard. I am on the pathway to becoming a sworn officer, and am paying my dues through working security and going to college, but I have never once discounted an Officer that has made a career of being a Security Officer, unless they are a discrace to the title.
    In Maryland, a person can be employed as a security guard as long as they have submitted their guard application to the state police. It takes 60 to 180 days for processing and approval. Most companies in Maryland don't do background checks, because the state does them, and they can simply save time and money. Also, a GREAT majority of companies (other than federal security) in Maryland hire whoever applies and simply wait for the state police approval. Maryland DOES not require drugs tests, etc.

    One of my good friends that works security just told me about the company owner and management finding out that his supervisor smokes weed. She still has a job today. AND carries a firearm.

    I have SEVERAL friends that I have worked with in security that are now police officers, and several more in the process. I, myself have chosen security and investigations as my career. I've worked with top notch security officers.
    "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by BadBoynMD
      I, myself have chosen security and investigations as my career. I've worked with top notch security officers.
      Good for you! And, we sometimes forget how many cops go into security, too! Not a few of them can tell you they're making more on the private side than they would ever have made in LE, and they still get to do some mighty interesting work, as well. I've been involved in some investigations on the private side that were every bit as challenging, dangerous, and crime-related as anything I did in LE, including one that involved organized crime. I only saw one mobster when I was in LE, and that was from a hundred yards away while we backed up the feds who were serving a warrant. My big part in the operation was to tell a little old lady in a red Pinto why she couldn't go home just then. My, my! I didn't know little old ladies knew such words.

      What many do not realize is that there are significant areas of crime that the LE agencies simply do not have the resources or manpower to pursue, and that are left to the private side to handle. The individual who wants to be a criminal investigator will find plenty of opportunities in private agencies like the SIU units of insurance companies and other specialized groups that investigate everything from arsons to homicides and even cases that involve national security and defense.
      Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-13-2007, 12:42 AM.
      "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

      "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

      "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

      "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

      Comment


      • #18
        Originally posted by SecTrainer
        Good for you! And, we sometimes forget how many cops go into security, too! Not a few of them can tell you they're making more on the private side than they would ever have made in LE, and they still get to do some mighty interesting work, as well. I've been involved in some investigations on the private side that were every bit as challenging, dangerous, and crime-related as anything I did in LE, including one that involved organized crime.

        What many do not realize is that there are significant areas of crime that the LE agencies simply do not have the resources or manpower to pursue, and that are left to the private side to handle. The individual who wants to be a criminal investigator will find plenty of opportunities in private agencies like the SIU units of insurance companies and other specialized groups that investigate everything from arsons to homicides and even cases that involve national security and defense.
        Absoloutely! It's funny how you just mentioned that as I just literally had a coversation with a friend about this.
        "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

        Comment


        • #19
          I sometimes have to laugh when security is sometimes characterized as "observe and report".

          The reason I laugh is that you could describe cops the same way a lot of the time, too. We'd get a call, show up and take a report - that's it. Not much difference really. (Wait - I lie. If the perp was hiding under the bed and sneezed on a dust bunny or something, we'd probably notice him and haul him off to the pokey.) And now they don't even do that in some departments where the citizen has to file his own report over the Internet!

          1. Check which one applies. Were you:

          a. Burgled.
          b. Robbed.
          c. Assaulted.
          d. Murdered.

          2. Have you checked under the bed?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          3. Would you like to investigate this crime yourself?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          4. If you checked "Yes" to question #3, do you have a fingerprint kit?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          5. Did you save your Junior G-Man badge from your last box of Cracker Jacks?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          6. Are you aware that ALL criminals have 12 fingers, wear black stocking caps and turtlenecks, chew tobacco and have a scar running down the left side of their face?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          7. Do you believe that you are capable of following a trail of tobacco spit?

          a. Yes.
          b. No.

          8. On a separate piece of paper, list the items that were stolen.

          9. Okay, that was very funny. Now list the items that were really stolen.

          10. Repeat the oath of office, as follows, before witnesses (if you have no witnesses, your cat or a geranium will suffice): I, INSERT NAME HERE (NO, DO NOT SAY "INSERT NAME HERE"), swear that I will find whoever did this dirty deed and will bring them to the police station. I will not attempt to submit vouchers for gas, mileage, or any other expenses incurred in this investigation.


          Guess that would be called "don't observe and don't report" - a step forward in crime-fighting, no doubt. Well, at least it allows more time to write speeding tickets and what-not if we don't tie up officers with taking reports from those pesky citizens.
          Last edited by SecTrainer; 03-13-2007, 01:29 AM.
          "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

          "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

          "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

          "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

          Comment


          • #20
            Well said both of you! This field is so vast, one can specialize in only part of it and run full tilt just keeping up with the changes.
            When you send your guide to an agency you are about to visit in a month or so or a client, they soon find out there is so very much they have to know about their complex and people. They may ask you to chuck the whole idea or in case of an agency, gulp, grin and move out. You nor your agency have time or funding to keep you on site for a month or more doing all the legwork. They follow the guide, make their corrections and answer all the questions and you go in for a period of up to two weeks and verify all they have presented to you. They know this as a result of your initial correspondence and in-briefing. In addition, nose around on your own at all hours, day and night, camera, camcorder, and pocket sized recorder. You conduct an out briefing and let them know the finished report along with photographs will be forwarded within the time specified in the agency agreement or contract with the client.
            There will be other times when you start to gather initial information, you inform the agency or client that additional specialists from different fields will be needed to perform technical analysis of one form or another. All this has to be vectored and written in dick and jane language for the agency or client and technical language for those who need to perform the specified tasks all of which must be covered in executive summary.
            When you finish all of this you are numb. You can only do so many of these a year as a private contractor or in a large firm, the director of inspections or surveys meshes all of these items.
            You rightly stated, IMHO, those who this field is for knuckle draggers fail to grasp their part in the overall scheme of things or much worse, ignorant and or stupid or lazy.
            Enjoy the day,
            Bill

            Comment


            • #21
              Obviously you need to re-read my post.
              I apologize if I took your statements out of context. After reading “Boxerguard’s” post and may have wrongly taken your post to mean that you believe that the only people who would deign to work security were those who just couldn’t cut it as a Law Enforcement Officer, and given your previous statements in other posts that you own a security company, I assumed that these are the type of people that you are hiring to work for you. Now reading some of your later posts I see that I may have misjudged you, and if so I apologize for lumping you in with the likes of “Boxerguard”

              Giving up training opportunities that no police department ANYWHERE in your area would be able to provide you with? Wow, please enlighten me and everyone else about this training that you can recieve, but the cops can't.
              It wasn’t my intention to make it appear that there was training that is open to the private security person but closed to law enforcement personnel. The point I was attempting to make is that in my experience, my organization has a much larger per capita training budget than that of most of the Police Departments in the area. This allows us to schedule a much more diverse training curriculum than most public agencies who have their budget tightly controlled by elected officials.

              Most of the officers from local law enforcement agencies that I work with are lucky to get much training over above their state mandated certification hours each year. While in the last year I have traveled off site to attend training in administration and programming of access control hardware and software, computer and IT network security, implementing advanced CCTV solutions, crime prevention through environmental design, command and training of security personnel, fire alarm systems, conducting vulnerability surveys and site assessments; I have also had on site training in Haz-Mat operations, defense and arrest tactics (quarterly re-certifications), bike patrol operations, mental illness, identification of street and pharmaceutical drugs and drug users, the FEMA incident command system, non-violent crisis intervention (similar to verbal judo), gang symbology, medical first responder training (re-certification), and personnel management.

              As “SecTrainer” alluded to, the security industry has a much more diverse mission than that of law enforcement, so naturally there will be many more opportunities to expand ones horizons through training. Of course I also understand that by working in the private sector there is some training that I would have little or no use for; in private industry I will probably never have the need to receive training in SWAT and sniper tactics, or in vehicle pursuits; and I have the utmost respect for the law enforcement officers who are out on the street every day protecting all of us. It was not my intention to bash the police I work with them on a daily basis and they are the ones that I call for back up when the S#$% really hits the fan.
              Drew Neckar
              Hospital Security Supervisor
              ---------------------------------------------------

              Always forgive your enemies--nothing annoys them so much.
              --Oscar Wilde—

              Comment


              • #22
                He lives in Wisconsin. Trust me, he has a larger training budget than some agencies in his area. Only 3 agencies in all of Wisconsin are CALEA certified. I don't think there's a 5-star LE agency IN Wisconsin.

                They have up to two years to get 60 credit hours of police training, except for some Sheriff's Departments, who have to hire a fully trained officer by law.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #23
                  It wasn’t my intention to make it appear that there was training that is open to the private security person but closed to law enforcement personnel. The point I was attempting to make is that in my experience, my organization has a much larger per capita training budget than that of most of the Police Departments in the area. This allows us to schedule a much more diverse training curriculum than most public agencies who have their budget tightly controlled by elected officials.

                  Most of the officers from local law enforcement agencies that I work with are lucky to get much training over above their state mandated certification hours each year. While in the last year I have traveled off site to attend training in administration and programming of access control hardware and software, computer and IT network security, implementing advanced CCTV solutions, crime prevention through environmental design, command and training of security personnel, fire alarm systems, conducting vulnerability surveys and site assessments; I have also had on site training in Haz-Mat operations, defense and arrest tactics (quarterly re-certifications), bike patrol operations, mental illness, identification of street and pharmaceutical drugs and drug users, the FEMA incident command system, non-violent crisis intervention (similar to verbal judo), gang symbology, medical first responder training (re-certification), and personnel management.

                  As “SecTrainer” alluded to, the security industry has a much more diverse mission than that of law enforcement, so naturally there will be many more opportunities to expand ones horizons through training. Of course I also understand that by working in the private sector there is some training that I would have little or no use for; in private industry I will probably never have the need to receive training in SWAT and sniper tactics, or in vehicle pursuits; and I have the utmost respect for the law enforcement officers who are out on the street every day protecting all of us. It was not my intention to bash the police I work with them on a daily basis and they are the ones that I call for back up when the S#$% really hits the fan.[/QUOTE]

                  "I apologize if I took your statements out of context. After reading “Boxerguard’s” post and may have wrongly taken your post to mean that you believe that the only people who would deign to work security were those who just couldn’t cut it as a Law Enforcement Officer, and given your previous statements in other posts that you own a security company, I assumed that these are the type of people that you are hiring to work for you. Now reading some of your later posts I see that I may have misjudged you, and if so I apologize for lumping you in with the likes of “Boxerguard”

                  I can understand where you were coming from, which is why I stated you needed to re-read what I wrote. Therefore, apology accepted no harm done, brother. I apologize also.

                  "It wasn’t my intention to make it appear that there was training that is open to the private security person but closed to law enforcement personnel. The point I was attempting to make is that in my experience, my organization has a much larger per capita training budget than that of most of the Police Departments in the area. This allows us to schedule a much more diverse training curriculum than most public agencies who have their budget tightly controlled by elected officials.

                  Most of the officers from local law enforcement agencies that I work with are lucky to get much training over above their state mandated certification hours each year. While in the last year I have traveled off site to attend training in administration and programming of access control hardware and software, computer and IT network security, implementing advanced CCTV solutions, crime prevention through environmental design, command and training of security personnel, fire alarm systems, conducting vulnerability surveys and site assessments; I have also had on site training in Haz-Mat operations, defense and arrest tactics (quarterly re-certifications), bike patrol operations, mental illness, identification of street and pharmaceutical drugs and drug users, the FEMA incident command system, non-violent crisis intervention (similar to verbal judo), gang symbology, medical first responder training (re-certification), and personnel management. "

                  Okay, I understand what you're saying. There are some small department here in Maryland that can not send their officers to specialized training and schools other than what is mandated. Of course the state and federal grants help here and there. I was under the impression, however that you were getting that the cops couldn't.

                  "As “SecTrainer” alluded to, the security industry has a much more diverse mission than that of law enforcement, so naturally there will be many more opportunities to expand ones horizons through training. Of course I also understand that by working in the private sector there is some training that I would have little or no use for; in private industry I will probably never have the need to receive training in SWAT and sniper tactics, or in vehicle pursuits; and I have the utmost respect for the law enforcement officers who are out on the street every day protecting all of us. It was not my intention to bash the police I work with them on a daily basis and they are the ones that I call for back up when the S#$% really hits the fan."

                  I definitely can say I know you weren't bashing police officers.
                  "Nothing in all the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." - Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

                  Comment

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