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Is Security A Toxic Industry? Does It Draw Toxic People

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  • Is Security A Toxic Industry? Does It Draw Toxic People

    This is going to be a hard topic to define so please bear with me as I try to communicate it correctly.

    When I started doing security in the early 2000s most of my coworkers were in their late 20s or early 30s with a smattering of military retirees. Most of them had been with our company for at least a few years.

    I remember my program manager saying frequently that "Security by its nature is a transient industry, people don't stay" but that wasn't really my experience. Unless someone screwed up really bad we didn't have a lot of turn over.

    As time went on though I noticed a gradual shift some (but not all) of it was younger people (Millennials &Gen z) entering the work force. Some of it may have been because I went to work for a scrub company (AUS) which oddly enough I the largest in the industry.


    I don't know how else to say it but I started seeing some REALLY defective and entitled employees showing up at work.

    I'm not going to give a lot of examples but I'm going to try to give some representative examples.

    I worked on a site where the post orders were EXPLICIT two foot patrols an hour. I got into an argument with a coworker about it one day and I showed her the paragraph in the post orders. It wasn't even like I was trying to tell her what she had to do, I was just showing it to her.

    She ended up telling me that no matter what she was not going to do two foot patrols (Each maybe a third of a mile) every hour and I ended up telling her I didn't care but there's a field supervisor found out that she shouldn't bitch because she knew what she was supposed to do.

    A couple of days later a trainee showed up and in that case it was my place to tell him how to do Patrols. So I got out the post orders book to show him two patrols an hour, 9 scans, 3 Gates and the entire section of the post orders covering patrol procedures had been removed from the post orders book. Wonder who could have done that?

    Another example was a night that I came to work and the person that I relieved showed me a pass on from the office that all third-party deliveries were to be logged on a sign-in sheet to include the carrier name and the registration number on the trailer of the truck.

    It happened that there was a third-party carrier truck parked right behind our company vehicle. The registration sheet that my coworker was showing me had no entry on it and I asked him about it and he went absolutely ballistic and told me it wasn't my place to tell him how to do his job. Well wait a second dude, you're sitting here telling me how to do my job, what's the difference?

    The guy then went to the supervisor and told him that I had put my hands on him WTF?

    so, I know these are horrible examples but but I don't know how else to describe the toxic environment that it seems to me like security became before I retired.

    This last example I didn't witness, my supervisor told me about it. My very last assignment for Allied was roving Patrol. The company vehicle had a GPS tracker on it as well as a dash cam. The swing shift guy wood start his Patrol and he would basically Drive 25 miles up the interstate and 25 miles back and then go sit in the parking lot for 8 hours. I mean there was GPS and video evidence that this guy was doing that. There was also the fact that there were no key cards read on any of the low income housing units that he was supposed to be checking or any scans done during his shift. Incontrovertible evidence he was not doing his job and management knew it.

    instead of disciplining him my supervisor wanted me to double up on all my patrols during my shift to make up for the stops at this guy wasn't making.

    How can a company expect to keep good employees doing that and more so keep their current clients and gain new ones?
    Last edited by The Night Rider; 05-23-2022, 01:58 AM.

  • #2
    Keep pay kow & turnover high - accounts come & go; no biggie if u lose 1 here & there; once u pick up another 1, just rake in the profits & ignore it as if it doesn't exist lol

    Just continue 2 (under)bid 4 more contracts: all with a sales pitch of a used car salesman

    Simply hire a surplus of warm bodies that pass a background check to staff all these, paying $10-$14/hr, while pocketing the remaining $30-35 per man hour

    There u have it - 4 95% of guard firms, @ the end of the day it's all about making a profit - & hiring quality staff that calls 4 a higher wage would be rather unconducive 2 that

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by The Night Rider View Post
      This is going to be a hard topic to define so please bear with me as I try to communicate it correctly.

      When I started doing security in the early 2000s most of my coworkers were in their late 20s or early 30s with a smattering of military retirees. Most of them had been with our company for at least a few years.

      I remember my program manager saying frequently that "Security by its nature is a transient industry, people don't stay" but that wasn't really my experience. Unless someone screwed up really bad we didn't have a lot of turn over.

      As time went on though I noticed a gradual shift some (but not all) of it was younger people (Millennials &Gen z) entering the work force. Some of it may have been because I went to work for a scrub company (AUS) which oddly enough I the largest in the industry.


      I don't know how else to say it but I started seeing some REALLY defective and entitled employees showing up at work.

      I'm not going to give a lot of examples but I'm going to try to give some representative examples.

      I worked on a site where the post orders were EXPLICIT two foot patrols an hour. I got into an argument with a coworker about it one day and I showed her the paragraph in the post orders. It wasn't even like I was trying to tell her what she had to do, I was just showing it to her.

      She ended up telling me that no matter what she was not going to do two foot patrols (Each maybe a third of a mile) every hour and I ended up telling her I didn't care but there's a field supervisor found out that she shouldn't bitch because she knew what she was supposed to do.

      A couple of days later a trainee showed up and in that case it was my place to tell him how to do Patrols. So I got out the post orders book to show him two patrols an hour, 9 scans, 3 Gates and the entire section of the post orders covering patrol procedures had been removed from the post orders book. Wonder who could have done that?

      Another example was a night that I came to work and the person that I relieved showed me a pass on from the office that all third-party deliveries were to be logged on a sign-in sheet to include the carrier name and the registration number on the trailer of the truck.

      It happened that there was a third-party carrier truck parked right behind our company vehicle. The registration sheet that my coworker was showing me had no entry on it and I asked him about it and he went absolutely ballistic and told me it wasn't my place to tell him how to do his job. Well wait a second dude, you're sitting here telling me how to do my job, what's the difference?

      The guy then went to the supervisor and told him that I had put my hands on him WTF?

      so, I know these are horrible examples but but I don't know how else to describe the toxic environment that it seems to me like security became before I retired.

      This last example I didn't witness, my supervisor told me about it. My very last assignment for Allied was roving Patrol. The company vehicle had a GPS tracker on it as well as a dash cam. The swing shift guy wood start his Patrol and he would basically Drive 25 miles up the interstate and 25 miles back and then go sit in the parking lot for 8 hours. I mean there was GPS and video evidence that this guy was doing that. There was also the fact that there were no key cards read on any of the low income housing units that he was supposed to be checking or any scans done during his shift. Incontrovertible evidence he was not doing his job and management knew it.

      instead of disciplining him my supervisor wanted me to double up on all my patrols during my shift to make up for the stops at this guy wasn't making.

      How can a company expect to keep good employees doing that and more so keep their current clients and gain new ones?
      This is pretty good Having been doing Security for 50 years of this June I have seen it all From oil refineries, to gated town houses, shopping plazas, concerts colleges , Chevrolet dealerships overnights, construction sites, factories I would rather work alone My present site is a chemical factory weekends I do patrols, trucks in, and out, and access control at site control, and if I screw up got no one to blame for me But Lord it is true The Good The Bad The Ugly I have seen come, and go. Lazy bastards. People who want to voice their view points Democrat Republican

      The Key to this Job
      • MYOB
      • STFU
      • Do your Job
      • Be on time
      • Go home

      http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

      Comment


      • #4
        It is a hard topic, because for every generalization there is always an exception. I work with a very good crew - a mixture of 20-somethings, Gen X and Boomers. We all have different backrounds and politics, but we come in, work together, and try to be pleasant with each other. A good boss, good pay and benefits and a "no drama allowed" atmosphere helps.

        Yes, this industry attracts certain types. If you are a low energy, minimum effort kind of person, door rattling and sitting much of the time is appealing. If you don't like supervision, let's face it - a lot of sites you are on your own for 8 hours; you just have to look up from your phone or laptop when the field supervisor shows up or the fire alarm goes off.

        Many Gen Zers understand that the corporation is not their friend, and they are just a disposable commodity. The days of working for a company for 20 or 30 years and getting a pension evaporated in the 1970s and 1980s. (My father worked for his company for 25 years. He got two years of his pension, and then a letter declaring that the company was bankrupt, and oopsie, they didn't fund the pension.)

        And yes, a certain low percentage of guards are people who couldn't be cops, or like to be on petty power trips. Sadly, they're the ones that generate a lot of the stereotypes and bad publicity for the guard industry. Then there is the "fox in the hen house" types - what better way to steal than to be the guy that's supposed to make sure there's no stealing?

        The only good thing contract companies do is be the "minor league" for in house security - the best contract guards get poached for in house jobs.
        Last edited by Condo Guard; 05-24-2022, 06:37 PM. Reason: spelling, clarity

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
          It is a hard topic, because for every generalization there is always an exception. I work with a very good crew - a mixture of 20-somethings, Gen X and Boomers. We all have different backrounds and politics, but we come in, work together, and try to be pleasant with each other. A good boss, good pay and benefits and a "no drama allowed" atmosphere helps.

          Yes, this industry attracts certain types. If you are a low energy, minimum effort kind of person, door rattling and sitting much of the time is appealing. If you don't like supervision, let's face it - a lot of sites you are on your own for 8 hours; you just have to look up from your phone or laptop when the field supervisor shows up or the fire alarm goes off.

          Many Gen Zers understand that the corporation is not their friend, and they are just a disposable commodity. The days of working for a company for 20 or 30 years and getting a pension evaporated in the 1970s and 1980s. (My father worked for his company for 25 years. He got two years of his pension, and then a letter declaring that the company was bankrupt, and oopsie, they didn't fund the pension.)

          And yes, a certain low percentage of guards are people who couldn't be cops, or like to be on petty power trips. Sadly, they're the ones that generate a lot of the stereotypes and bad publicity for the guard industry. Then there is the "fox in the hen house" types - what better way to steal than to be the guy that's supposed to make sure there's no stealing?

          The only good thing contract companies do is be the "minor league" for in house security - the best contract guards get poached for in house jobs.
          Pretty darn good. Yes, the days of working 50 years for the XYZ corporation, here is your Gold Watch, now get the f*ck out are gone Yes true on power trips Some, not all, youth are put in charge of a 2nd, or 3rd shift "I am the boss, you listen! " I am too old to listen to this crap, and will be gonzo I work contract security so perhaps I am lucky I can apply for another place to go, and keep my vacation pay
          http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

          Comment


          • #6
            I mean, my first assignment was for the city government working for a contract company. It really wasn't a bad gig. The pay wasn't great but it was above scale.

            It wasn't until I left that assignment that I noticed things going downhill (for lack of a better term) and with all due respect it was concurrent with the work force becoming younger and more entitled.

            maybe it's not security it's the world that is Toxic

            Comment

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