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  • Better protocols for school security

    ttps://www.npr.org/2019/11/27/782902802/active-shooter-drills-may-not-stop-a-school-shooting-but-this-method-could?utm_source=pocket-newtab

    Gist of the article is that 'lock down drills" just traumatize younger kids and those with developmental challenges. Threat reviews and active monitoring of social media work better.

    I know I mentioned this awhile ago, but I was very impressed with my son's high school 'thinking out of the box' when a series of threats came in. After shutting down the school and having lock downs three times within as many weeks, they went for a "surge" approach. On the next day something was supposed to happen, they had extra security, two police officers and parents who were given special training and all access badges to patrol the entire day. Not only did nothing happen, but suddenly the threats went away. No more missed school days, and since the parents were volunteers, the school budget wasn't wrecked.

  • #2
    My kid’s school had a neat volunteer program for law enforcement parents. Off duty cops could volunteer to walk and hang out in the school and were given access to the teachers’ lounge and were given a free lunch. The program was successful and a lot of patents signed up. There always seemed to have at least two off-duty and armed cops in the school.
    http://firearmsnerd.com/

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    • #3
      The article is wrong. More BS. Children WANT to know what to do. Same philosophy as Fire Drills. I’ve never heard of a kid being traumatized by them...

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      • #4
        I remember, growing up in Southern California, having several earthquake drills while in school. Although I wasn’t traumatized by the drills, they did have an impact. I remember after a drill the idea of earthquakes happening all the time seemed real. The drills reinforced the idea that earthquakes are a constant and regular threat and I should be on the lookout.

        Active shooter drills may not traumatize children, but I am sure they effect the consciousness of the kids about shooting in schools. Despite the regular media coverage, school shootings are extremely rare. Also despite the hype and mischaracterization of statistics related to school shootings; the number of shootings is not on the rise and hasn’t been for eleven years. I don’t know if active shooter drills are something we should include the kids on.

        http://firearmsnerd.com/

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        • #5
          I suspect it is how it is done, and the parents. I always emphasized after lock downs (real or drill) that these things are rare, and a lot of threats are kids either trying to get out of a test or just getting off on making everyone alter their routine. In one lock down kids had to urinate in a bucket behind a blanket - that was a bit traumatic.

          We've seen stories of teachers that haven't done drills correctly (or added their own stupid commentary), which doesn't help. You have to tailor training to your audience. When I did Homeland Security training with adults I started to treat it like disaster training, because I had two types that would constantly interrupt - either the guy who saw it as such an abstract and remote possibility that he wouldn't listen, or the gal convinced that ISIS was around the corner and wanted to go over every scenario possible. Disasters are different because it isn't personal - the earthquake, volcano or tornado are phenomenon and not looking to kill you specifically. As long as you don't overwhelm your audience you can get it done.

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          • #6
            Actually, school shootings are on the rise. You might want to review the latest stats from a DOJ/USSSS.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Soper View Post
              Actually, school shootings are on the rise. You might want to review the latest stats from a DOJ/USSSS.
              It might depend on the definition of "school shooting". Generally, we think of some disgruntled student shooting a bunch of innocent students during school. It could include, though, one student who is a gang member shooting a second student who is a rival gang member in the parking lot, or even a gang shooting at 2am by people who aren't even students in a school field or parking lot.

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              • #8
                Hence I said DOJ/USSS not the media or FBI.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Soper View Post
                  Hence I said DOJ/USSS not the media or FBI.
                  The DOJ casts a wide net when collecting shooting data. For school shootings I believe thy take any shooting on school grounds or during any school activity. If someone shoots a parked car in a school parking lot at 02:00 am, I understand will count as a “school shooting” with the DOJ. I also think that lawful shootings (by the school resource officer) are counted in the DOJ statistics as a “school shooting.”

                  I found this definition of a school shooting from the Department of Homeland security (I know its another agency, but I couldn’t find DOJ’s definition): Their definition of what makes an incident a “school shooting,” which they have defined as, when a “gun is brandished, is fired, or a bullet hits school property for any reason, regardless of the number of victims (including zero), time, day of the week, or reason.”
                  http://firearmsnerd.com/

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