Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Black band for badges protocol

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Black band for badges protocol

    Thankfully have not had to deal with this recently, but curious for future reference. I know security is not required to wear the black band over the badge when a police officer is slain; it appears to be a company by company policy. Two companies I worked for passed them out when a local officer was killed; we wore them until the funeral or for 30 days, if I remember right. Is there an "official" policy on this?

    I've also seen the new mourning bands have a blue stripe - is that just for law enforcement? Thanks in advance for any info.

  • #2
    Security wearing black bands to mourn the respect of a police officer seems a little "wannabe-ish" to me, to be honest.

    Comment


    • #3
      Agreed. In the one case we had guys working for us that had family members in the affected department; in the other case it was just the guards that worked in the city where it happened. I would never personally wear a blue stripe one ( for the same reason I don't have a blue stripe American flag) - I'm not a cop and I don't have any family currently in law enforcement.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
        Agreed. In the one case we had guys working for us that had family members in the affected department; in the other case it was just the guards that worked in the city where it happened. I would never personally wear a blue stripe one ( for the same reason I don't have a blue stripe American flag) - I'm not a cop and I don't have any family currently in law enforcement.
        Yeah, I recognize that there are situations in which security guards (as individuals or as a company/department) might want to honour police officers. To be honest, I don't really think that it's wannabe-ish in itself, but it can give that impression to outsiders.

        I know there's no central authority with the "thin X line" icons that distinguish various groups, but maybe there could be some sort of honourary-type, such as a dotted line instead of a solid line. It could be intended to show support with X group without suggesting that you are a part of that group.

        Comment


        • #5
          I think the unofficial protocol for "mourning bands" is for folks in the same community to wear them while the flags are half-staffed. I know in California your badge number or name must be visible at all times; so if you don't have your name on your uniform your mourning band can't cover your badge number.

          I think wearing of morning bands (called draping the badge) would be appropriate if it was someone who had ties to your department.
          http://firearmsnerd.com/

          Comment


          • #6
            The actual protocol typically varies by agency. I personal don't wear them as Security, but that is my personal preference. I've worn them as an LEO for fallen friends or members of neighboring agencies, and as Honor Guard. But as Security IMHO it just doesn't seem... right to me.

            That being said, if your company allows it, and you are so inclined, a thin black band until after the Officer is laid to rest should suffice.
            "What if this is as good as it gets?" ~ Melvin Udall

            Comment


            • #7
              As a retired police officer, I wear one when a colleague or fellow officer dies. If my officers want to wear one, that's fine. It is a mark of respect for the fallen.

              I appreciate the show of support shown by non-LE security personnel.

              There is an argument that it looks "silly" by security officers, and I wholeheartedly disagree. It is proper, professional, and right.

              Comment


              • #8
                Gotta disagree with you Chief. It is the province of fellow cops. It’s a show of respect for a Brother or Sister. Guards aren’t part of it.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Soper - I would disagree. If the officer does not feel that he is part of something then he is not. And it is true many officers scorn security - and rightly so. Why? because officers have let themselves go. Securitas is the prime example - they stand around, do nothing...and that's it. I remember as a police officer, effecting a difficult arrest and summoning one of them to help me - who refused. The ONLY reason I didn't arrest him for failing to aide a police officer was because my sergeant overruled me. But I was fuming.

                  Security officers can be professional - they can know their duties, and work within them. But others who only stand and watch make others look bad - the same as the Tacti-cool ones who think they're swat.

                  Being incompetent is just as dangerous as overzealous. But we've strayed from the mark.

                  Officers that are dedicated protective services professionals have a place in the public safety family. Those that think they are removed from it, won't ever be a part of it.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by DeputyChief04 View Post
                    Soper - I would disagree. If the officer does not feel that he is part of something then he is not. And it is true many officers scorn security - and rightly so. Why? because officers have let themselves go. Securitas is the prime example - they stand around, do nothing...and that's it. I remember as a police officer, effecting a difficult arrest and summoning one of them to help me - who refused. The ONLY reason I didn't arrest him for failing to aide a police officer was because my sergeant overruled me. But I was fuming.

                    Security officers can be professional - they can know their duties, and work within them. But others who only stand and watch make others look bad - the same as the Tacti-cool ones who think they're swat.

                    Being incompetent is just as dangerous as overzealous. But we've strayed from the mark.

                    Officers that are dedicated protective services professionals have a place in the public safety family. Those that think they are removed from it, won't ever be a part of it.
                    The job of most security guards is to observe and report, not to physically intervene. They are not trained or equipped to do so.
                    As for arresting one for "failing to aid" you, I'm assuming that by "difficult arrest" you mean the person was resisting and/or assaultive.
                    The courts have generally found that security guards are like any other private citizens wearing a uniform.
                    The courts would no more likely expect them to enter a dangerous situation to assist you than they would a McDonalds employee, Fedex Employee, custodian, etc..
                    Now, if you had asked them to call 911 for you and they refused, that would be a whole different matter.

                    Comment

                    Leaderboard

                    Collapse
                    Working...
                    X