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  • #16
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ID:	247797 I’m with Securitas and they do have a decent uniform policy but it’s not strictly enforced. When I got hired in they gave me a 3X shirt (I’m an XL) for one of the accounts I work and a 2X for the other one. I flat out refused to report to work until they got me proper fitting shirts.
    I bought 5.11 pants instead of wearing their cheap Galls cargo pants (it’s worth the money BTW)
    I wear black socks always along with either my Under Armour Boots or my adidas trail runners.
    I have tattoos on my arms so I wear a black long sleeve compression shirt under my uniform top.
    I’m always clean shaven.
    I feel that as a society we are getting slack I’ve even seen sworn police officers who look like **** in their uniform but it all boils down to personal pride and it shows and don’t get me started on physical fitness!!!
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    Last edited by Cobbdiesel; 05-29-2019, 07:46 PM.

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    • #17
      No matter where I have worked my personal standards have always exceeded whatever company standard put out including when I was in the Army. While on active duty anytime we were in garrison my BDU's were pressed (we were only required to wash and wear) and boots spit shined. When I was a Corrections Officer my uniforms were dry-cleaned and pressed, boots spit shined.

      As a member of the Emergency Response Team (ERT) our uniforms were the standard black BDU's and that uniform, for obvious reasons I only washed and wore.

      The accounts I work right now have us wearing polo shirts and I wear 5.11 tactical pants that exceed the standard set forth by my current employer because they look better and are way more comfortable than the cheap Gall's **** they issue. Black t-shirt, black socks and I wear either my black Under Amour boots or my black Adidas Terrex Trail shoes, neither of which can be polished but are kept clean and serviceable at all times.

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      • #18
        I'll toss in another wrinkle, which is the fact that security uniforms are not restricted the way police uniforms are, and there are a lot of "generic" guards. Impersonating a security guard is not unheard of; car prowlers in Seattle a few years ago were wearing "Security" jackets until they were seen on camera and one of them left his behind.

        Twice this week I've seen people who may or may not have been guards. One was just walking down the street in a security t-shirt but obviously non regulation shorts and shoes. Don't know if he was going to or from work, or if it was laundry day. The other was a bit more serious - the hair cut and general appearance made me question whether this guy worked at one of the stores and was on a break, or was casing the facility. Turns out he was a legit employee. So - appearance counts.
        Last edited by Condo Guard; 07-03-2019, 03:18 PM.

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        • #19
          Disney. Their way or the highway. Soft, simple and very Micky like. Ugh!
          My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

          -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

          -It's just a job kid deal with it

          -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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          • #20
            Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
            I'll toss in another wrinkle, which is the fact that security uniforms are not restricted the way police uniforms are, and there are a lot of "generic" guards. Impersonating a security guard is not unheard of; car prowlers in Seattle a few years ago were wearing "Security" jackets until they were seen on camera and one of them left his behind.

            Twice this week I've seen people who may or may not have been guards. One was just walking down the street in a security t-shirt but obviously non regulation shorts and shoes. Don't know if he was going to or from work, or if it was laundry day. The other was a bit more serious - the hair cut and general appearance made me question whether this guy worked at one of the stores and was on a break, or was casing the facility. Turns out he was a legit employee. So - appearance counts.
            A lot of getting away with physical theft comes with simply "looking the part". If I were a bad guy and looking to steal stuff, I would go out and put together a generic security guard uniform.

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            • #21
              Now that the holidays are here, the stores are hiring their own guards. As usual, a very mixed crew. This week's "Hall of Shame" is the guard whose shirt was so wrinkled I thought she was wearing a t-shirt with a jacket over it until I walked by a second time. (Hopefully it was the company's fault - more than once in the past a contract company has handed me a shirt from a literal pile and said, "go work this site in an hour...")

              On a variation of my previous comment, looking professional and acting professional will also earn you good will points. I will stop and chat with guards who are clearly alert and doing the job. If I get to know you a bit I will pass on information that I am allowed to.

              On the other hand, if you constantly have your hat on backwards, walk around in your red & white Jordans (or look bored, angry or are constantly on your iphone) I'm going to keep walking my beat - you don't care, and I don't have the time.
              Last edited by Condo Guard; 11-27-2019, 05:00 PM.

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              • #22
                We are a visible presence. We deter, observe, and report crime (which is IMO lots more fun than it sounds). We should hold ourselves to a decent level of dress, depending on the environment that we work in. For example, if I volunteer for the 5k run for my church, a tshirt with security on it and a pair of black bdus and boots should do. On security patrol? A nice, tucked-in uniform shirt and duty belt (if authorized). And, while people will always complain of "rentacops" the whole point of our existence is to do the initial work of observing the crime and reporting it for LE, making their jobs easier. So, what I'm trying to say is that just LOOK DECENT, PLEASE. HAVE SOME RESPECT FOR YOURSELF, YOUR COMPANY, AND THE REST OF US. Sorry, didn't mean to shout. Thanks.

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                • #23
                  California and Arizona have some security uniform standards that only concern identification. I wish there were some professionalism standards as well. To the public we are all the same; we may hold ourselves as professionals and dress the part, but the billy-bag-o-dougnuts guard will be the image we are held to.

                  There was a fight in California to make two levels of security guards. One level would be the t-shirt wearing unprofessional guard where the other level would be the trained security professional The state considered it and held a few meetings about it, but the large companies (Wells Fargo and Brinks at the time) fought hard against it and won.

                  California requires approved patches on both arms and a badge (with a unique number or name) for any officer that carries a baton or firearm. All patches and badges must be unique, approved, and have the companies name. Generic security badges and badges are prohibited in the state for security guards.
                  http://firearmsnerd.com/

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by SoCalGuard View Post
                    California and Arizona have some security uniform standards that only concern identification. I wish there were some professionalism standards as well. To the public we are all the same; we may hold ourselves as professionals and dress the part, but the billy-bag-o-dougnuts guard will be the image we are held to.

                    There was a fight in California to make two levels of security guards. One level would be the t-shirt wearing unprofessional guard where the other level would be the trained security professional The state considered it and held a few meetings about it, but the large companies (Wells Fargo and Brinks at the time) fought hard against it and won.

                    California requires approved patches on both arms and a badge (with a unique number or name) for any officer that carries a baton or firearm. All patches and badges must be unique, approved, and have the companies name. Generic security badges and badges are prohibited in the state for security guards.
                    Generally speaking, governments can only regulate occupational fields to ensure the safety of its employees and the public. A 400 pound guard with a uniform that's too small, missing buttons and has ketchup stains may look really bad, but it's hard to prevent via regulation.

                    The problem with security guard "levels" is that there's no clear distinction between what the "levels" would signify. In addition, if the higher "levels" were to require significant training, then there's be significant costs involved and very few clients would pay for a higher "level" guard.

                    We can complain about guards who don't give a damn, but I think we need to recognize that guarding is, and was never meant to be, a profession. It's mostly a minimum-wage job for students, people between jobs, the retired, etc.. Heck, if you look at the original security guards (night watchmen), they were usually employees who worked at a factory or something, but either got hurt on the job and couldn't do their old job anymore (this being before disability benefits and the like) or retired people.

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
                      We can complain about guards who don't give a damn, but I think we need to recognize that guarding is, and was never meant to be, a profession. It's mostly a minimum-wage job for students, people between jobs, the retired, etc.. Heck, if you look at the original security guards (night watchmen), they were usually employees who worked at a factory or something, but either got hurt on the job and couldn't do their old job anymore (this being before disability benefits and the like) or retired people.
                      I think the night watchmen of the past still have a role; they are now the unprofessional security guard. With changes in society, regulations, and fiduciary responsibilities there is a place for the trained professional security officer.

                      Think back to the role the police officer once had; the peace officers of old were social workers and ambulance drivers. Now the role of police is much more professional and other professionals have taken over many of the old police responsibilities. We have professional fire fighters who go through real training. We have professional paramedics who go through a certification process. We even have certified social workers who perform the bulk of the old peace officer role. There is definitely a place for the trained professional security officer in today’s world.



                      http://firearmsnerd.com/

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                      • #26
                        Originally posted by SoCalGuard View Post

                        I think the night watchmen of the past still have a role; they are now the unprofessional security guard. With changes in society, regulations, and fiduciary responsibilities there is a place for the trained professional security officer.

                        Think back to the role the police officer once had; the peace officers of old were social workers and ambulance drivers. Now the role of police is much more professional and other professionals have taken over many of the old police responsibilities. We have professional fire fighters who go through real training. We have professional paramedics who go through a certification process. We even have certified social workers who perform the bulk of the old peace officer role. There is definitely a place for the trained professional security officer in today’s world.


                        I'm not sure how you differentiate between a "professional security officer" and an "unprofessional" night watchman. I've seen many professional might watchmen, and many who have the training and skills needed to do their jobs.

                        While many places should have highly-trained, well paid guards, the reality is that it's not happening. As I've seen in the industry, more and more places that should have them are letting them go and replacing them with poorly paid contract staff, or accounts that have well-paid could ntract guards from Company A are giving the contracts to low-paid guards with Company B.

                        I've seen too many decently-paid security guards who though t they had a "career" in security only to find the above happen to them and they end up working for low wages. As I mentioned before, being a security guard was never meant to be a career. I don't say this put of animosity or anger, but more of a warning to guards who may have gotten too comfortable.

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                        • #27
                          "I've seen too many decently-paid security guards who though they had a 'career' in security only to find the above happen to them and they end up working for low wages. As I mentioned before, being a security guard was never meant to be a career. I don't say this out of animosity or anger, but more of a warning to guards who may have gotten too comfortable."

                          Well said, Console. You have to constantly be honing your skills. Being in middle management is the dangerous place - not a lot of those jobs anymore due to automation and restructuring. (Look at all the contract company mergers that have occurred over the last five to ten years.) The real money in this industry is at the top, or specialized security (think Triple Canopy).

                          The place I was at had an upper management change - and I went through a year of hell as they got rid of their older workers and those at the top of their pay scale (i.e. me). I worked for a year at "Guards-R-Us" until I got a good position elsewhere.
                          So, always look your best - you never know when you might be looking for your next job...
                          Last edited by Condo Guard; 12-03-2019, 12:13 PM.

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                          • #28
                            I honestly think that if someone is trying to make security a career then they should move away from spending times a security guard and move towards another field that will help them develop the skills and experience that are necessary for the career-type jobs. Being a guard simply does not provide those skills, and saying that someone wants to "move up the security ladder" by being a security guard is similar to someone wanting to "move up the health car ladder" by being an orderly. Both jobs require significant education and skills that simply will not be taught at their current job.

                            I was a security guard for quite a while before I obtained my career-type security job with the government. I can honestly say that very little I learned as a guard is applicable, and looking at the people I work with, most of them never were security guards, and the few that were only did it while in school or for a short while before moving onto a career.

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                            • #29
                              I completely understand the common perception that a job in security could not be a fulfilling career. If you can see many of my past posts, I have been fighting to change that perception.

                              Many folks know one aspect of security and that is the poorly paid non-benefited jobs more common in the industry. I would like more folks to realize that security can in-fact be a well-compensated career-type position. I have personal experience working several career-type jobs both in a contract and in-house position. Contract security on some government sites pays around $25 with full benefits. Nuclear security pays around $30 per hours with awesome benefits. Several in-house positions (hospital, school, utilities) pay in the $25-35 per hour range with full benefits. This may be a long way from upper-crust pay, but there is always promotion potential in these jobs.

                              http://firearmsnerd.com/

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by SoCalGuard View Post
                                I completely understand the common perception that a job in security could not be a fulfilling career. If you can see many of my past posts, I have been fighting to change that perception.

                                Many folks know one aspect of security and that is the poorly paid non-benefited jobs more common in the industry. I would like more folks to realize that security can in-fact be a well-compensated career-type position. I have personal experience working several career-type jobs both in a contract and in-house position. Contract security on some government sites pays around $25 with full benefits. Nuclear security pays around $30 per hours with awesome benefits. Several in-house positions (hospital, school, utilities) pay in the $25-35 per hour range with full benefits. This may be a long way from upper-crust pay, but there is always promotion potential in these jobs.
                                As I mentioned, though, I've seen more and more well-paid inhouse jobs being contracted our, including hospitals and schools. It includes places where people once said "they can't contract us out; contract guards could never do our jobs...." and then they did. Similarly, I've seen government contracts where the guards were well-paid or decently-paid, until the agency replaced them with another company that pays their guards minimum wage.

                                I'm not trying to discourage anyone; I'm simply encouraging them to see which way the wind is blowing, so that they don't end up like so many people I've seen, where they're suddenly laid off at 40 or 50, and have no marketable skills.

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