Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How Liberal Is Your Dress/Appearance Code?

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • How Liberal Is Your Dress/Appearance Code?

    I realize that I might be "stepping on some toes" by posting this, but so be it. How liberal is your dress/appearance code? The reason I ask is because I work with an officer who wears a nose ring while on duty and in uniform. I am be the first to admit that I am old, old-fashioned, old-school and conservative. I also know that being an old, white, straight male is considered "evil" be many in today's world. So be it. I won't dispute any of this. However, some things are actually a safety hazard.

    Here is an example of someone I used to work with that had a safety issue. The deputy has very long, dark hair and wore it down while on duty, in uniform, on patrol one night. She and the rest of the shift ended up at a "knock down/drag out" and someone grabbed her hair and she was essentially (effectively) handicapped because the assailant used her hair against hair--literally. She, obviously, learned a hard lesson that night and never wore it like that again, while on duty and in uniform.

    I get how some/many/most here are probably the "observe and report" type of guard. I get it. I really do. At this point, many police departments/sheriff's offices, in this "post Fergadishu" world are RODs. (Retired On Duty.) Take your calls, type up a nice police report, BUT don't do ANY pro-active cop work.

    However, despite all of the above, even if you ARE an "Observe And Report" guard, you could still have to interact, and go "toe-to-toe" with someone. And, if you do, I really think that gauges in the ear, long, dangly earrings and, yes, nose-rings are a safety hazard. They can, and perhaps WILL, be used against you. Some homeless guy or gal might see you in uniform, not realize, or care, that you are just an "O & R" guard, and decide that is is time for a battle.

    Anyway, all of that aside, am I being an "old fuddy duddy" by thinking that a nose ring, while on duty and in uniform is just too unsafe? What is it like at your place of employment? I am not expecting a Marine Corp haircut, spit shined boots and gun belt. However, some things, at least to me, just seem too unsafe, even for an A&R guard. Footwear, for example. Are open toes shoes and/or pumps too "over the top" even for an O&R guard?

    Anyway, let's hear it. What are some of the most egregious things you have seen AND does your organization do anything about it or do they just "turn a blind eye" because all they want is a warm body?

  • #2
    Nose rings, gauges, visible piercings, Tats ALL detract from a professional image. Just because they think it's cool, doesn't mean it is in the workplace. Besides, all I gotta do is grab and rip and your guard is no longer a worry...

    Comment


    • #3
      I am employed with contract security....Securitas, Allied Universal
      I have to adhere to a strick dress code
      Black socks
      Black Shoes
      Company issued shirt
      Hair neatly trimmed
      No nose ring
      For men, no earrings
      My only jewelery is my wedding ring

      BTW:: Jim 1348
      Do not say your sorry for who you are
      I am old, old-fashioned, old-school and conservative. I also know that being an old, white, straight male is considered "evil" be many in today's world
      I am damn f*cking tired of ths PC crap and sorry for me being me
      I like who I am, and I am not about quiver or bow down to know one
      http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

      Comment


      • #4
        I've learned to be OK with a few concessions, just because if it is a "business casual" place and the workers are young, you're going to have a tough time finding people without tattoos, etc. But there has to be common sense. On one site hair had to be tucked under the hat or inside the shirt. I noticed that female officers that worked for awhile and saw some fights generally got short hair cuts on their own.

        A small stud earring or piercing (and I mean real small) seemed OK. Nose ring? No way. If you couldn't cover the tats, then it was a case by case basis - but generally face, neck and hand tattoos were frowned on. I do recall one guy did have a large tattoo, but as I recall it was not offensive and it helped that he was the hardest working and most competent guard on the site.

        In contrast, the big boss would show up to meetings with vendors and clients in an out of style plaid shirt and blue jeans, while whining about how everyone else needed to be "professional."

        Comment


        • #5
          Well, I think dress codes as a society are loosening (as they have been since the early 20th century....) but I suspect a lot of it is not so much "We allow the guard to wear X item , have X tattoo, etc..." as it is "we pay minimum wage. We can't be too picky about what we expect from people....".

          A lot of it is keeping the client happy, and if the client doesn't specifically object to it the company is not going to do anything.

          Comment


          • #6
            We've got somewhat stricter standards. There is some variation in the way our uniforms can be worn, but other

            standards are set in stone. We cannot have most facial hair because we are required to wear a breathing apparatus if

            the need arises.
            Last edited by FederalSecurity; 05-09-2019, 09:51 AM.
            "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
            - Thomas Jefferson

            “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”
            — Vince Lombardi

            "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

            IX. Strive to attain professional competence.

            Comment


            • #7
              Sadly, I think tech culture, popular music artists and the fads of the wealthy to look like they're poor have led to the culture we have today. You've probably seen the meme, "Hobo or hipster?" Sometimes I really have to look to determine which. The ripped jean look that young women of means dress in makes me laugh - it used to be that if your jeans were that badly ripped you bought a new pair or patched them.

              Some industries are still pretty conservative - most of the bank guards I've seen are clean shaven and not sporting snake tatoos on their arms. FS's comment about wages is on the money - at minimum wage, as long as they're awake, sober and wearing their hat forward, they're good to go.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Jim1348 View Post
                I realize that I might be "stepping on some toes" by posting this, but so be it. How liberal is your dress/appearance code? The reason I ask is because I work with an officer who wears a nose ring while on duty and in uniform. I am be the first to admit that I am old, old-fashioned, old-school and conservative. I also know that being an old, white, straight male is considered "evil" be many in today's world. So be it. I won't dispute any of this. However, some things are actually a safety hazard.

                Here is an example of someone I used to work with that had a safety issue. The deputy has very long, dark hair and wore it down while on duty, in uniform, on patrol one night. She and the rest of the shift ended up at a "knock down/drag out" and someone grabbed her hair and she was essentially (effectively) handicapped because the assailant used her hair against hair--literally. She, obviously, learned a hard lesson that night and never wore it like that again, while on duty and in uniform.

                I get how some/many/most here are probably the "observe and report" type of guard. I get it. I really do. At this point, many police departments/sheriff's offices, in this "post Fergadishu" world are RODs. (Retired On Duty.) Take your calls, type up a nice police report, BUT don't do ANY pro-active cop work.

                However, despite all of the above, even if you ARE an "Observe And Report" guard, you could still have to interact, and go "toe-to-toe" with someone. And, if you do, I really think that gauges in the ear, long, dangly earrings and, yes, nose-rings are a safety hazard. They can, and perhaps WILL, be used against you. Some homeless guy or gal might see you in uniform, not realize, or care, that you are just an "O & R" guard, and decide that is is time for a battle.

                Anyway, all of that aside, am I being an "old fuddy duddy" by thinking that a nose ring, while on duty and in uniform is just too unsafe? What is it like at your place of employment? I am not expecting a Marine Corp haircut, spit shined boots and gun belt. However, some things, at least to me, just seem too unsafe, even for an A&R guard. Footwear, for example. Are open toes shoes and/or pumps too "over the top" even for an O&R guard?
                Jim, my outlook on officers that have potentially hazardous grooming practices is this...

                If the company doesn't mind officers' personal choices or doesn't enforce existing standards, I'll disregard any rings,

                necklaces, nose rings, sandals, etc., that other officers may sport. It is their personal choice to sport such

                appearances. HOWEVER, I also believe that if and when a physical conflict occurs and my partner's man bun gets

                used as an "idiot handle" by an aggressor, it will (or should) serve as a hard-earned, long-lasting lesson and may be

                accompanied by a "I told you so" talk.

                I also agree with Soper on physical appearances detracting from our professionalism and mission effectiveness. If

                other officers start coming in with purple mohawks or nose rings and earrings that are connected by chains, it may

                be time to start considering other employment.
                Last edited by FederalSecurity; 05-09-2019, 10:47 AM.
                "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
                - Thomas Jefferson

                “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”
                — Vince Lombardi

                "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

                IX. Strive to attain professional competence.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by copelandamuffy View Post
                  BTW:: Jim 1348
                  Do not say your sorry for who you are
                  I am old, old-fashioned, old-school and conservative. I also know that being an old, white, straight male is considered "evil" be many in today's world
                  I am damn f*cking tired of ths PC crap and sorry for me being me
                  I like who I am, and I am not about quiver or bow down to know one




                  Well said, Cope!

                  I too am an old(er), half-white straight male, and a conservative Republican as well. My opinion is that the

                  race-baiters, PC Police, and rabble-rousers of today have taken the victim mentality and "#metoo movement"

                  too far. It seems to me that political correctness has replaced morality, decency, and common sense in our society,

                  and our nation is suffering because of it.
                  Last edited by FederalSecurity; 05-09-2019, 11:19 AM.
                  "The price of freedom is eternal vigilance."
                  - Thomas Jefferson

                  “Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence.”
                  — Vince Lombardi

                  "Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that." - Martin Luther King, Jr.

                  IX. Strive to attain professional competence.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by FederalSecurity View Post

                    Well said, Cope!

                    I too am an old(er), half-white straight male, and a conservative Republican as well. My opinion is that the

                    race-baiters, PC Police, and rabble-rousers of today have taken the victim mentality and "#metoo movement"

                    too far. It seems to me that political correctness has replaced morality, decency, and common sense in our society,

                    and our nation is suffering because of it.
                    Key word. Common Sense. I thank God our kids are not the Snowflakes, and whom you named above
                    I happen to not like certain induvial persons. Race, male female , sexual choice religion has got Zippo to
                    why I do not like a person

                    Most loathsome person I have ever encountered in my almost 70 years of existence on this planet is
                    a 65 year old white heterosexual, Christian male

                    I have met gallons of people who yes are Gay, Black, Muslim, Democrats Republicans, heterosexual, Conservative Liberal, male, female
                    Christian, White, Jewish. etc., etc., etc. whom I am honored to call my friends

                    But do not place me in a box because I am what I am. BTW: I am a proud Scottish/Swedish American
                    I married a beautiful Portuguese woman


                    http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I think that lower-paying security companies/departments may not be able to realistically have strict uniform/appearance standards, but that doesn't mean that they shouldn't have any at all.

                      When I worked for a low-wage company, they didn't require us to press or iron our shirts, but we couldn't have a ton of wrinkles either. Similarly, we allowed running shoes instead of dress shoes or boots, as long as they were black without any flashy logos. It was ok if you didn't shave that morning, but you couldn't look like you hadn't shaved for weeks...

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In the past when I was starting out, most companies seemed to have a standard uniform, with regulations that were loosely enforced unless the client said something about it. From what I've been reading on this forum over the years, not much has changed on that end of the business.

                        In my current experience, the client seems to set the standard for what they want as far as uniform/appearance goes. My current employer has numerous clients all over the world, and regardless of company policy, the mission dictates the uniform. Some clients may want the classic BDU uniform, while others may want polos and khakis. Some are OK with facial hair, others want clean shaven. Some just tell us to wear what we would normally wear on the street. Our clients tend to be upscale sites, and I am aware that this is not the norm in today's business. However, if the client demands a uniform, our company is very strict to ensure compliance.


                        Comment

                        Leaderboard

                        Collapse
                        Working...
                        X