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  • Miscarriage of Justice in Progress((

    https://ktla.com/2018/12/31/security...d-with-murder/

    Absolutely disgusting how the criminals are seen as victims😡.

    Aand what's the solution?...Disarm the guards; make it easier 4 the crooks 2 steal😡🤬.

  • #2
    He better get a good lawyer. California is one of those states where "fear for your life" is very narrowly defined. The fact that the suspect was running away and allegedly unarmed doesn't help.

    All the other stuff (race, orientation, etc.) is really irrelevant, but this is the 24/7 media age we live in - instant judgment and all kinds of people working an angle to increase their fame, fortune and number of "likes." (Not to mention hoping for Squid's "Ghetto Lottery," paid for by Walgreens.)

    The policy in Seattle is hands off and let them leave for property crimes. The armed guard is there to deter aggressive shoplifters or actual armed robberies. (Believe it or not I heard an Oregon cosmetics store got robbed at gunpoint - didn't make any sense until it was explained to me that a couple of bottles of expensive perfume or skin cream would be worth $1000 or more.)

    Unarmed guards are window dressing and scarecrows - absolutely ineffective.
    Last edited by Condo Guard; 02-12-2019, 04:03 PM.

    Comment


    • #3
      in SF Area, Walgreens guards are NOT to protect "the store" or the goods, ONLY to protect employees (and MAYBE shoppers). A finer point question on that is "if a drug fiend demands a 'script of dope be filled, at what point does the guard protect the meek little pharmacist who is refusing and at what point should the guard cooperated in the robbery to error on side of employee safety?". Not sure.

      Anyways, this guard did EXACTLY what they tell you NOT to do. I'm sure he then went on to TRIPLE-down and say all the wrong things to the police, all excited at the scene, BEFORE asking for a lawyer.

      The second responding cops feel they got any loose loaded guns more or less under-control, they are gonna go hard trying to get excited people to talk themselves into prison before the "subject" can think clearly. Cops will be exploiting your natural urge to "do the right thing as a member of community" etc and "tell the truth", without remorse or mercy. Right now the cops that CONNED him into spilling his guts and answering "do you see a gun, did he have a gun???" "No, sir, no gun" AND "did you intend to shoot him with your gun", "Yes, I aimed and shot", are getting hi-5s from peers and respect from bosses for doing so.

      Not even seasoned cops who have done this to other people countless times can resist the urge to "spill guts" without thinking. That is why most Police Union contracts prohibit anyone grilling a cop "in trouble" without his Union Rep and a Police Union lawyer talking to him first and during any questioning. I was working on new McMansion for guy that was a Police Union lawyer, and "on call" 24/7. Suddenly it seemed all the cops in town were friendly and give me a wave when they saw my rather unique vehicle.

      Please review excellent and famous Youtube "Never talk to the police". However, in last part he brings on a veteran cop who says "I've never had a case where a guy got off because he talked to the police", that may be true for larger charges, but I've been accosted numerous times doing minor stuff (maybe even felony if you priced out "damage" on park turf) like drinking on school grounds, tearing up turf with motorcycle, trespassing, shooting BB guns, dogs in no-go zone, etc, and been let go with warning whereas if I'd tried to "play hardball" I'm sure I've been arrested and charged.

      BUT.....could he (Walgreens policy notwithstanding) say he had made a Citizen's Arrest and was using min force required to prevent arrestee escaping??? Probably not in reality, but court ain't reality. One of my pet peeves is there is no Proportionality in C.A.

      Reminds me interview where he asked me what I'd do if posted at the door (armed) and guy is bumrushing out with armful of obviously not paid for items. Not catch a murder case, assault charges, or HIV is what I'd do. I'd be very wary of Bed Bugs and TB and few other things as well. I'll have to make my money on that action on the construction side, installing 1/2" armored plexiglass to protect the $1.09 shampoo bottles.
      Last edited by Squid; 02-12-2019, 05:11 PM.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
        or skin cream would be worth $1000 or more.)

        Unarmed guards are window dressing and scarecrows - absolutely ineffective.
        that probably that stuff they they put baby's foreskins in (no joke, look it up)

        You should see the Samoan guard at my discount supermarket. I wouldn't call him "unarmed", his arms are thicker than my legs, and I'm a big dude. Legend is he was hit by a Mack truck, hard enough to bust the grill and puncture the radiator. He walked away, they towed the Mack.

        Speaking of not knowing when to shut-up, "This mistake of a human being, because he had a badge and a gun, felt like he had every right to pull a weapon on my child," said Psychesia Hart. "Psychesia" is her name. Try not to smirk, I dare you. The "victim", her son, is described as "homeless" (in the same town as Mother PSYCHESIA), and she is calling the man her gay, homeless son attacked a "mistake of a human being". IMO, she just lost all but $500K of that $550 million she is suing for.

        If she was gonna open her big mouth she should've bashed Walgreens, not the guard, because the guard doesn't have the 1/2 billion she wants. Does CA still have the "deep pocket" law where if one party is only 1% at fault they have to pay if they have the money? I'm not sure. https://www.tysonmendes.com/defendin...ous-liability/
        Last edited by Squid; 02-12-2019, 04:51 PM.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Squid View Post
          in SF Area, Walgreens guards are NOT to protect "the store" or the goods, ONLY to protect employees (and MAYBE shoppers). A finer point question on that is "if a drug fiend demands a 'script of dope be filled, at what point does the guard protect the meek little pharmacist who is refusing and at what point should the guard cooperated in the robbery to error on side of employee safety?". Not sure.

          Anyways, this guard did EXACTLY what they tell you NOT to do. I'm sure he then went on to TRIPLE-down and say all the wrong things to the police, all excited at the scene, BEFORE asking for a lawyer.

          The second responding cops feel they got any loose loaded guns more or less under-control, they are gonna go hard trying to get excited people to talk themselves into prison before the "subject" can think clearly. Cops will be exploiting your natural urge to "do the right thing as a member of community" etc and "tell the truth", without remorse or mercy. Right now the cops that CONNED him into spilling his guts and answering "do you see a gun, did he have a gun???" "No, sir, no gun" AND "did you intend to shoot him with your gun", "Yes, I aimed and shot", are getting hi-5s from peers and respect from bosses for doing so.

          Not even seasoned cops who have done this to other people countless times can resist the urge to "spill guts" without thinking. That is why most Police Union contracts prohibit anyone grilling a cop "in trouble" without his Union Rep and a Police Union lawyer talking to him first and during any questioning. I was working on new McMansion for guy that was a Police Union lawyer, and "on call" 24/7. Suddenly it seemed all the cops in town were friendly and give me a wave when they saw my rather unique vehicle.

          Please review excellent and famous Youtube "Never talk to the police". However, in last part he brings on a veteran cop who says "I've never had a case where a guy got off because he talked to the police", that may be true for larger charges, but I've been accosted numerous times doing minor stuff (maybe even felony if you priced out "damage" on park turf) like drinking on school grounds, tearing up turf with motorcycle, trespassing, shooting BB guns, dogs in no-go zone, etc, and been let go with warning whereas if I'd tried to "play hardball" I'm sure I've been arrested and charged.

          BUT.....could he (Walgreens policy notwithstanding) say he had made a Citizen's Arrest and was using min force required to prevent arrestee escapizng??? Probably not in reality, but court ain't reality. One of my pet peeves is there is no Proportionality in C.A.

          Reminds me interview where he asked me what I'd do if posted at the door (armed) and guy is bumrushing out with armful of obviously not paid for items. Not catch a murder case, assault charges, or HIV is what I'd do. I'd be very wary of Bed Bugs and TB and few other things as well. I'll have to make my money on that action on the construction side, installing 1/2" armored plexiglass to protect the $1.09 shampoo bottles.
          As usual, your utter lack of knowledge of Police actions and the law is shown yet again in another EPICALLY STUPID post.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Soper View Post

            As usual, your utter lack of knowledge of Police actions and the law is shown yet again in another EPICALLY STUPID post.
            try to be a little more specific. I'll be first to admit I tend to make sweeping statements without regard to precision. I'm posting on a general discussion forum, not drafting a Contract.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Squid View Post
              in SF Area, Walgreens guards are NOT to protect "the store" or the goods, ONLY to protect employees (and MAYBE shoppers). A finer point question on that is "if a drug fiend demands a 'script of dope be filled, at what point does the guard protect the meek little pharmacist who is refusing and at what point should the guard cooperated in the robbery to error on side of employee safety?". Not sure.

              Anyways, this guard did EXACTLY what they tell you NOT to do. I'm sure he then went on to TRIPLE-down and say all the wrong things to the police, all excited at the scene, BEFORE asking for a lawyer.

              The second responding cops feel they got any loose loaded guns more or less under-control, they are gonna go hard trying to get excited people to talk themselves into prison before the "subject" can think clearly. Cops will be exploiting your natural urge to "do the right thing as a member of community" etc and "tell the truth", without remorse or mercy. Right now the cops that CONNED him into spilling his guts and answering "do you see a gun, did he have a gun???" "No, sir, no gun" AND "did you intend to shoot him with your gun", "Yes, I aimed and shot", are getting hi-5s from peers and respect from bosses for doing so.

              Not even seasoned cops who have done this to other people countless times can resist the urge to "spill guts" without thinking. That is why most Police Union contracts prohibit anyone grilling a cop "in trouble" without his Union Rep and a Police Union lawyer talking to him first and during any questioning. I was working on new McMansion for guy that was a Police Union lawyer, and "on call" 24/7. Suddenly it seemed all the cops in town were friendly and give me a wave when they saw my rather unique vehicle.

              Please review excellent and famous Youtube "Never talk to the police". However, in last part he brings on a veteran cop who says "I've never had a case where a guy got off because he talked to the police", that may be true for larger charges, but I've been accosted numerous times doing minor stuff (maybe even felony if you priced out "damage" on park turf) like drinking on school grounds, tearing up turf with motorcycle, trespassing, shooting BB guns, dogs in no-go zone, etc, and been let go with warning whereas if I'd tried to "play hardball" I'm sure I've been arrested and charged.

              BUT.....could he (Walgreens policy notwithstanding) say he had made a Citizen's Arrest and was using min force required to prevent arrestee escaping??? Probably not in reality, but court ain't reality. One of my pet peeves is there is no Proportionality in C.A.

              Reminds me interview where he asked me what I'd do if posted at the door (armed) and guy is bumrushing out with armful of obviously not paid for items. Not catch a murder case, assault charges, or HIV is what I'd do. I'd be very wary of Bed Bugs and TB and few other things as well. I'll have to make my money on that action on the construction side, installing 1/2" armored plexiglass to protect the $1.09 shampoo bottles.
              Yeah, the "never talk to the police" idea should come with an asterisk. If it's something relatively minor that the police have the ability to overlook or not proceed with criminal charges, then it may be a person's best interests to be as cooperative as possible to hopefully avoid criminal charges. If, however, a person is suspected of something that the police pretty much have no choice but to lay charges, or it looks like they're going to do that, then it's in the person's best interests to remain silent.

              It should be noted too that the "don't talk to the police" doesn't only apply when someone is suspected of committing a criminal act. It also is important to remember in any situation where civil liability can come into play. In Ottawa (Canada), there was recently a bus accident where three people were killed and multiple people were injured. The driver was arrested shortly after by police (they didn't specify why, but suggested that it was necessary) but was released without charges later that night. Nothing has been confirmed, but I suspect that she realized that she was facing a lot of potential civil liability, and that giving an unguarded statement to the police was not in her best interests, so she "lawyered up". The inconvenience of having been arrested may have saved her tens of thousands of dollars in civil losses had she made a statement without speaking to her lawyer that could have unknowingly implied civil culpability.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

                Yeah, the "never talk to the police" idea should come with an asterisk. If it's something relatively minor that the police have the ability to overlook or not proceed with criminal charges, then it may be a person's best interests to be as cooperative as possible to hopefully avoid criminal charges. If, however, a person is suspected of something that the police pretty much have no choice but to lay charges, or it looks like they're going to do that, then it's in the person's best interests to remain silent.

                It should be noted too that the "don't talk to the police" doesn't only apply when someone is suspected of committing a criminal act. It also is important to remember in any situation where civil liability can come into play. In Ottawa (Canada), there was recently a bus accident where three people were killed and multiple people were injured. The driver was arrested shortly after by police (they didn't specify why, but suggested that it was necessary) but was released without charges later that night. Nothing has been confirmed, but I suspect that she realized that she was facing a lot of potential civil liability, and that giving an unguarded statement to the police was not in her best interests, so she "lawyered up". The inconvenience of having been arrested may have saved her tens of thousands of dollars in civil losses had she made a statement without speaking to her lawyer that could have unknowingly implied civil culpability.
                Keeping your big mouth shut is a skill that most of us need training to accomplish. I recommend it as part of unannounced live drill on the job stress testing. Have some random person start asking your guards questions and see if they give correct non-info response, mostly be asking THEM questions like "why do you want to know that?". Warning: Many special snowflakes will take this very personally and might quit or claim "hostile work environment" because why not.

                I always felt the gimmick on TV show "Jeopardy" was just annoying and added nothing but what do I know. Maybe it was about how in US courts there is no "double jeopardy" UNLESS you don't remember to only respond 'in the form of a question' and thus not legally give any further info, which would allow them to charge you with a "new" crime???

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Soper View Post

                  As usual, your utter lack of knowledge of Police actions and the law is shown yet again in another EPICALLY STUPID post.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

                    Yeah, the "never talk to the police" idea should come with an asterisk. If it's something relatively minor that the police have the ability to overlook or not proceed with criminal charges, then it may be a person's best interests to be as cooperative as possible to hopefully avoid criminal charges. If, however, a person is suspected of something that the police pretty much have no choice but to lay charges, or it looks like they're going to do that, then it's in the person's best interests to remain silent.

                    It should be noted too that the "don't talk to the police" doesn't only apply when someone is suspected of committing a criminal act. It also is important to remember in any situation where civil liability can come into play. In Ottawa (Canada), there was recently a bus accident where three people were killed and multiple people were injured. The driver was arrested shortly after by police (they didn't specify why, but suggested that it was necessary) but was released without charges later that night. Nothing has been confirmed, but I suspect that she realized that she was facing a lot of potential civil liability, and that giving an unguarded statement to the police was not in her best interests, so she "lawyered up". The inconvenience of having been arrested may have saved her tens of thousands of dollars in civil losses had she made a statement without speaking to her lawyer that could have unknowingly implied civil culpability.
                    I'm pretty sure this is a dumbest post I've read all day. You don't get to decide when the crew police are going to overlook something. You don't get to decide if what you're talking to them about and something they can even overlooked. You're always better not talking to the police until you spoken to a lawyer.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Lunch Meat View Post

                      I'm pretty sure this is a dumbest post I've read all day. You don't get to decide when the crew police are going to overlook something. You don't get to decide if what you're talking to them about and something they can even overlooked. You're always better not talking to the police until you spoken to a lawyer.
                      There are some minor offenses, such as speeding, where the police have the option of proceeding formally (such as a ticket) or not. I'm saying that if you are suspected of something minor, it may be helpful to answer basic questions in the hope that the police will not proceed with criminal charges. Keep in mind that for these things the police usually have evidence you did it (such as a radar gun) so the benefits of saying something to hopefully avoid them laying criminal charges/issuing a citation may outweigh the potential risks of saying something incriminating.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

                        There are some minor offenses, such as speeding, where the police have the option of proceeding formally (such as a ticket) or not. I'm saying that if you are suspected of something minor, it may be helpful to answer basic questions in the hope that the police will not proceed with criminal charges. Keep in mind that for these things the police usually have evidence you did it (such as a radar gun) so the benefits of saying something to hopefully avoid them laying criminal charges/issuing a citation may outweigh the potential risks of saying something incriminating.
                        Thanks for explaining the law to me it must be rough to be the smartest person on the forum

                        Now go home and get your shine box

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lunch Meat View Post

                          Thanks for explaining the law to me it must be rough to be the smartest person on the forum

                          Now go home and get your shine box
                          You're not overly amenable to helpful advice, are you?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I made an illegal left turn once in front of the sign in my early 20s at 2:00am. Cop behind me pulled me over and said, "Why did you do that?" I told him the truth - "Because I'm a dumba---, sir." I got a warning, no ticket.

                            That having been said, you do have the right to remain silent, and given our weird criminal justice system and a civil system powered by big jury awards and social media, silence is indeed golden.

                            On a side note, can we please get rid of the tiresome "shine box" and "hot pocket" insults? They're old now and not contributing anything useful. And before Lunch Meat and Lone Wolf attack, I'll beat them to the punch - here I go to eat a hot pocket while getting my shine box, yuk yuk yuk.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                              I made an illegal left turn once in front of the sign in my early 20s at 2:00am. Cop behind me pulled me over and said, "Why did you do that?" I told him the truth - "Because I'm a dumba---, sir." I got a warning, no ticket.

                              That having been said, you do have the right to remain silent, and given our weird criminal justice system and a civil system powered by big jury awards and social media, silence is indeed golden.
                              First of all remember we're not talking about a traffic ticket This Thread is about a shooting. When it's something that serious you probably would do very well not to speak to the police until you speak to a lawyer.

                              As squid noted if a police officer is involved in an officer-involved shooting he didn't have to say anything for 3 days and he doesn't have to say anything without a lawyer or a union rapper right there with him really a lawyer AND a union rep ( that he doesn't have to pay for by the way).

                              having said that the only time I ever got out of a traffic ticket is when the cop told me that he didn't have radar and I refused to answer how fast I was going.


                              Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                              On a side note, can we please get rid of the tiresome "shine box" and "hot pocket" insults? They're old now and not contributing anything useful. And before Lunch Meat and Lone Wolf attack, I'll beat them to the punch - here I go to eat a hot pocket while getting my shine box, yuk yuk yuk.
                              Let's be honest even though I'm probably going to get dinged for even mentioning his name Soper adds ZERO to this forum with his constant attacks against Squid, Lone Wolf and myself. When was the last time you even noticed him responding to a thread with a post that wasn't insulting to one of us three. He even does it on other forums.

                              So as far as I'm concerned the constant Hot Pockets references are just my way of pointing out how little value he actually brings to the discussion. I also really do believe he's sitting in his mom's basement eating hot pockets and telling her what a badass he is on the internet and as long as he's providing zero signal to noise ratio I'm going to respond in kind.

                              Last edited by Lunch Meat; 02-13-2019, 08:49 PM.

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