Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

How I would do Security Training

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • v859
    started a topic How I would do Security Training

    How I would do Security Training

    One of the issues holding back security as an industry is their low training and education requirements. To remedy this, while not making it to burdensome on businesses. I would implement a level system with the following levels

    Level I : Unarmed, observe and report only. Training will be around 24 hours and focus on: Basics of law for security; suspicious activity recognition and reporting; report writing; Patrol and access control; Interpersonal communications; ethics for security

    Level II: Unarmed, action taking, may be special police. Training around 100 hours and includes: Criminal Law; Constitutional Law; Civil law and liabilities; Ethics; Response to emergencies, Preliminary Investigations, Arrest Tactics/DT, Report writing and testifying, Interpersonal communications; Firearms safety and familiarization

    Level III: Armed security; Training consists of Level II plus firearms qualification.

    Optional modules at all levels: ICS/NIMS, Hazmat Awareness, Bloodborne Pathogens, Fire Safety/Emergency Action Plan, Emergency Medical Responder, First Aid/CPR/AED

    Optional modules at Level II and III: Management of Disabilities and Emotionally Disturbed, Baton, OC Spray

  • Condo Guard
    replied
    Practice speaking - good advice. They tell us to practice scenarios in our heads as to what we would do in situation X or situation Y, but if you interact with the public, you need to practice scripts. For example, in Verbal Judo they tell you not to say, "We can do this the easy way, or the hard way..." because you've just put yourself in a corner if the guy says, "OK - we'll do it the hard way."

    You also have to not bluff - in the city where I used to work, the police would come when called. I never say to anyone in Seattle "We're going to call the cops if you don't stop..." because the criminals all know it's an empty promise. Likewise, with all the SJWs around, you better know the rules and WHY those rules are in place.

    If you're not a good public speaker, memorize some critical phrases to fall back on, like "You may contact our Public Information rep, but I'm not authorized to speak at this time and must go back to doing my job." Never say, "No comment," as it implies you're hiding something.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squid
    replied
    I tell people to practice their Public Address/Public Speaking skillz with cell phone.

    If you see what you are really like you will want to practice.

    Leave a comment:


  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
    Sorry for the wordy last post - I timed out and couldn't edit. Lone Wolf: your FLETC reference reminded me of another issue with training - physical fitness. I wish companies would offer a bonus or incentive to at least meet some kind of minimum fitness standard. You could divide the required benchmarks into age groups and gender to make it fair.

    It isn't right that people who take their job seriously and are fit get the same pay as someone who clearly isn't (excluding medical conditions, of course). Full disclosure: I myself could probably lose around 15 pounds, but I can do all of the walking and stair climbing required, including emergency response.
    I've mentioned it before, but I think that implementing a physical fitness standard for security guards can be difficult. For police officers, it is generally recognized that there are certain core physical functions that a police officer must be able to carry out, even if they don't do it regularly (or hardly ever). For example, a police officer will rarely run after someone, hop over a short fence, drag someone, carry someone, etc. but they are tested under the assumption that they may occasionally do so or someday be expected to do so.

    As an example, I used to work with a guy who was morbidly obese (I figure he was at least 400 pounds). However, we were in an office building where the only real physical activity was to perform a patrol of approx. 1 mile every 2 hours. He was able to do that without any problems (I don't remember how long it took him, but it was within a reasonable amount of time). His position would never require him to jump a fence, climb multiple sets of stairs, run (maybe "walk fast" in an emegency), etc.. He would likely fail a standard physical fitness test, but he was fit enough to perform the tasks that were expected of him.

    Leave a comment:


  • Condo Guard
    replied
    Sorry for the wordy last post - I timed out and couldn't edit. Lone Wolf: your FLETC reference reminded me of another issue with training - physical fitness. I wish companies would offer a bonus or incentive to at least meet some kind of minimum fitness standard. You could divide the required benchmarks into age groups and gender to make it fair.

    It isn't right that people who take their job seriously and are fit get the same pay as someone who clearly isn't (excluding medical conditions, of course). Full disclosure: I myself could probably lose around 15 pounds, but I can do all of the walking and stair climbing required, including emergency response.

    Leave a comment:


  • Condo Guard
    replied
    Depends on the area, how hard it is is to recruit and the cost of living. Seattle police make @ $80,000 per year to start - but we also have the highest percentage rise in the cost of living, and you aren't getting a decent house in the city for under $400,000. Neighboring jurisdictions are offering a $15,000 bonus to go lateral, because they need more police and want experienced officers to deal with the rising crime problem. (Seattle just announced they'll match that, so you now have a bidding war between the various Puget Sound departments to get people.)

    For security, the starting wage here is now around $15.00 p/h. But again, you don't live in Seattle for $15.00 p/h unless you still live in your parents house or have three or more roommates. Rent for a studio is anywhere from $800 a month (cruddy neighborhood) to $1000 a month (decent neighborhood, small apartment). Gas in the city of Seattle is around $3.60 a gallon - which I why I make sure I'm always on half a tank or more and gas up outside city limits.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lone Wolf
    replied
    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

    That's a decent salary, though I suspect that those positions (even if you have a "special police"-type commission) are more like a standard security guard job than a police job. I can see why people might want to do that job instead of policing. However, if the job was basically a police-type job, why would anyone do it for $20 an hour, when someone could become a police officer and make $35+ an hour, better benefits, etc..
    $35+ an hour????? I didn’t realize the cops got to live like Leonardo DiCaprio.

    As for training in this industry, I would like to see more stringent training. Perhaps something to rival FLETC.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lunch Meat
    replied
    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

    That's a decent salary, though I suspect that those positions (even if you have a "special police"-type commission) are more like a standard security guard job than a police job.
    Did I ever say they weren't standard security jobs?


    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
    . I can see why people might want to do that job instead of policing. However, if the job was basically a police-type job, why would anyone do it for $20 an hour, when someone could become a police officer and make $35+ an hour, better benefits, etc..
    you're really good at reading into things aren't you?

    Leave a comment:


  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Lunch Meat View Post

    Do I realize this is slightly tangential (look it up Soper) to the topic but around here G4S pays around $20 an hour HSS starts people out at $19.50 on some of their government contracts.

    Knowing the cost of living where I'm at that's plenty of money to make your bills and put some aside for retirement on your own every week.

    Not to put too much of my business on the streets but a certain amount of my paycheck and all the overtime goes into savings every week
    That's a decent salary, though I suspect that those positions (even if you have a "special police"-type commission) are more like a standard security guard job than a police job. I can see why people might want to do that job instead of policing. However, if the job was basically a police-type job, why would anyone do it for $20 an hour, when someone could become a police officer and make $35+ an hour, better benefits, etc..

    Leave a comment:


  • Lunch Meat
    replied
    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

    Not to mention that how many "high speed low drag" operators are going to work for a private security company for low wages, no pension, crappy benefits (or not at all), little job security, etc..? They're going to find work as police officers, in the military, etc..
    Do I realize this is slightly tangential (look it up Soper) to the topic but around here G4S pays around $20 an hour HSS starts people out at $19.50 on some of their government contracts.

    Knowing the cost of living where I'm at that's plenty of money to make your bills and put some aside for retirement on your own every week.

    Not to put too much of my business on the streets but a certain amount of my paycheck and all the overtime goes into savings every week

    Leave a comment:


  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Squid View Post

    I've worked with a few bad ass or otherwise high caliber people who were doing it for same reason as I.

    Once on post, "your time is your own" 98% of the time, even more so that your so called "time off" where your GF, kids, good old buddies, etc all put demands on your time.
    No doubt that in those types of positions you will still get "high caliber" people who are good at their jobs (I've worked in those positions, and quite a few of my co-workers were retired cops). I'm thinking more of the positions that expect you to have the same qualifications, AND deal with a lot of the same crap police deal with, but at a much lower rate of pay. The way I see it, if you expect me to do the job of a security guard, then you can pay me security guard wages. However, if you expect me to basically do the job of a police officer, you'd better pay me police wages.

    Leave a comment:


  • Squid
    replied
    Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

    Not to mention that how many "high speed low drag" operators are going to work for a private security company for low wages, no pension, crappy benefits (or not at all), little job security, etc..? They're going to find work as police officers, in the military, etc..
    I've worked with a few bad ass or otherwise high caliber people who were doing it for same reason as I.

    Once on post, "your time is your own" 98% of the time, even more so that your so called "time off" where your GF, kids, good old buddies, etc all put demands on your time.

    Leave a comment:


  • Consolewatcher
    replied
    Originally posted by Lunch Meat View Post

    With the exception of the emergency medical responder there are warm body companies out there like G4S an Allied who will give you a level one $13 an hour guard with all those certifications. Again what company is going to pay for your high speed low drag operator?
    Not to mention that how many "high speed low drag" operators are going to work for a private security company for low wages, no pension, crappy benefits (or not at all), little job security, etc..? They're going to find work as police officers, in the military, etc..

    Leave a comment:


  • Squid
    replied
    Level 0: for ALL employees upon hire. About 5 minutes of highlights of Level 1 and "how being Security Aware can help the company help you".

    For any Guards: One hour's worth spread across 8 hour shift of Self Study Training EVERY DAY. That would actually be about 30 min max for most HS Grad level folks.

    A Smart Phone friendly website with selected Security subjects and quiz. Both general and site specific, like knowing where all the water shutoffs are in a building.


    "Studies show" that studying is best done in smallest possible parts with lots of breaks between, which is hard for NORMAL people to do but perfect for typical low intensity Security post.

    That way it wont cost client anything for "paid training" and guards will build up Site Specific knowledge that will make client re-consider replacing them.

    Plus, would give guards an excuse to be looking at their phones if client asks.
    Last edited by Squid; 01-29-2019, 04:52 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lunch Meat
    replied
    Originally posted by v859 View Post
    Optional modules at all levels: ICS/NIMS, Hazmat Awareness, Bloodborne Pathogens, Fire Safety/Emergency Action Plan, Emergency Medical Responder, First Aid/CPR/AED
    With the exception of the emergency medical responder there are warm body companies out there like G4S an Allied who will give you a level one $13 an hour guard with all those certifications. Again what company is going to pay for your high speed low drag operator?

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X