Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

surviving edged weapons (classic police training video)

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • surviving edged weapons (classic police training video)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vix6-afHzMg

    best parts of how to counter sudden close in (because as Security its not our job to bag knife wielding manics) knife attack and self-first-aid are mostly in last 30 mins.

    little dated but still good IMO.

    I'm pretty sure "knife attacks are on the rise" for several reasons.

    One thing they never mention when they say stuff like "grab his knife holding hand" is he will still have a free hand so steady yourself to take some punishment. One guy I knew who'd been in several real street fights said it was a good idea to have ANYTHING in your weak hand and act like it was a knife etc, to draw attention away from your strong hand with its knock out punch.

    On slightly diff note, I highly recommend the Harbor Freight cheap-O $6 machete with saw back AND sheath. Great for cutting down a few pesky overgrown plants and branches that would keep you from patrolling in back of building or conceal bad guys, etc. Million and one uses and "can't afford not to" everyday car equip. https://www.harborfreight.com/18-in-...ade-62682.html pic shows straight back w/out saw, check in stores. I'll use mine with sheath on to wave around in front of my face just to clear cobwebs.
    Last edited by Squid; 01-06-2019, 11:05 PM.

  • #2
    Thanks for the video, and info, Squid. This just serves to remind us all of the constant dangers that inherent of putting on a uniform and serving the public good.

    Comment


    • #3
      Wow - I'm old enough to remember the first time I saw this (lol). But some good points (Squid's machete advice aside). One of the first things I was taught on the street is never lean over a sleeping person - you're exposing your belly and are a prime target. (Waking up homeless / street people is always a big risk, because some automatically come up fighting.)

      Guns are expensive, and if you get caught with one the penalty is pretty big. Most homeless I've seen carry knives or blunt objects (crow bars seem to be popular - good for breaking in to places and clubbing people). Because I've seen crazy old ladies off their medication, I keep everybody at arms length 99% of the time. Contacting people from the vehicle is good - You have a mobile barrier and can escape at the push of the accelerator.

      On one of the other threads there was a warrior spirit discussion. There is also the concept of survival spirit - with modern medicine you can survive even brutal attacks, but you have to have the right mindset. People die all the time from simple wounds, because they go into shock and their body basically shuts down.

      Finally, trust your gut. The only knife fighter I've ever encountered (that I know of) was at 3:00am on a loading dock. I had a bad feeling the minute i saw him, and nothing he said added up. I never got close, was polite, told him if he was still there when I came back he'd talk to my supervisor (I was actually alone). The guy left. Turns out he was wanted in NY for murder one, and would have gutted me like a fish if I'd been dumb enough to get close and give him a hard time.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Lone Wolf View Post
        Thanks for the video, and info, Squid. This just serves to remind us all of the constant dangers that inherent of putting on a uniform and serving the public good.
        You don’t serve the public good. You work for a private employer. As a GUARD. You aren’t exposed to 99% of the problems out there. You need to rein it in and live in the Real World.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Soper View Post

          You don’t serve the public good. You work for a private employer. As a GUARD. You aren’t exposed to 99% of the problems out there. You need to rein it in and live in the Real World.
          many Guards (including those most at risk for knife attacks) work for PUBLIC employers (courts, parks, public schools and colleges, county fairs, public housing) and many are on front lines dealing with bad people, and doing so WITHOUT the type of backup, clout, training and last but not least LEGAL PROTECTION if god forbid we do something "wrong" during a knife attack (edit: "as actual police").

          Here are some guards employed by State Of CA State Parks. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kn9YdML8PPw (this was a park where a lot of big BBQ happened and the demographic had a high incidence of knife attacks.

          We also had a nice thread about some Park System in midwest that had "private" security issues.

          Further, IIRC, many post orders for "public" venues such as malls, cinemas, bars, amusement parks and even "neighborhood patrols" will use the "p-word".

          Its actually a minority of Security gigs that are "We don't care about Public, we ONLY protect our own".

          I'd guess the most common gig is where you work for private client, but property is "public" and your primary job is protecting safety of "general public" (including client employees) on-site. (property of clients secondary)


          Fact is, Private Security is fast displacing Police as the backbone of Public Safety due to several factors.

          1)Increased criminal demographic population and overcrowded prisons.

          2)New PC-de-policing policy.

          3)Stratification of wealth and Balkanization of society.

          4)Affirmative Action weakened police force.

          5)Out of control costs for hiring police.

          6)New PC criminal sentencing that makes crimes that have real victims non-punishable.
          Last edited by Squid; 01-09-2019, 12:15 AM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Soper View Post

            You don’t serve the public good. You work for a private employer. As a GUARD. You aren’t exposed to 99% of the problems out there. You need to rein it in and live in the Real World.
            Soper, read Squid’s following post again and again until you finally get it.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Lone Wolf View Post

              Soper, read Squid’s following post again and again until you finally get it.
              Pooper just wants to troll

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                Wow - I'm old enough to remember the first time I saw this (lol). But some good points (Squid's machete advice aside). One of the first things I was taught on the street is never lean over a sleeping person - you're exposing your belly and are a prime target. (Waking up homeless / street people is always a big risk, because some automatically come up fighting.)

                Guns are expensive, and if you get caught with one the penalty is pretty big. Most homeless I've seen carry knives or blunt objects (crow bars seem to be popular - good for breaking in to places and clubbing people). Because I've seen crazy old ladies off their medication, I keep everybody at arms length 99% of the time. Contacting people from the vehicle is good - You have a mobile barrier and can escape at the push of the accelerator.

                On one of the other threads there was a warrior spirit discussion. There is also the concept of survival spirit - with modern medicine you can survive even brutal attacks, but you have to have the right mindset. People die all the time from simple wounds, because they go into shock and their body basically shuts down.

                Finally, trust your gut. The only knife fighter I've ever encountered (that I know of) was at 3:00am on a loading dock. I had a bad feeling the minute i saw him, and nothing he said added up. I never got close, was polite, told him if he was still there when I came back he'd talk to my supervisor (I was actually alone). The guy left. Turns out he was wanted in NY for murder one, and would have gutted me like a fish if I'd been dumb enough to get close and give him a hard time.

                I was always taught to wake up vermin by kicking them in the feet. I am also very careful about not letting the street rats get within arm's length and I demand they keep their hands visible at all times.

                It's not common but they have caught a couple of street vermin carrying guns they've stolen from cars in my town.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lunch Meat View Post


                  I was always taught to wake up vermin by kicking them in the feet. I am also very careful about not letting the street rats get within arm's length and I demand they keep their hands visible at all times.

                  It's not common but they have caught a couple of street vermin carrying guns they've stolen from cars in my town.
                  I'd avoid any physical touching of vermin, even on private property. As soon as you touch them they can and will claim "assault and battery". Many vermin are like mini-lawyers. If you touch them first, and they call cops, and you tell cops "yeah, I kicked his feet to wake him up" I'm guessing Vermin could do a Citizens Arrest and cop would be painted into a corner and have to go along with it.

                  My advice would be:

                  1)turn on phone video before approaching.

                  2)use only bright lights, loud sounds, and last but not least, lies, to rouse vermin.

                  "I know you are awake, cops are coming to arrest any trespassers"

                  or "my boss is going to release Guard Dogs in 2 minutes"

                  or "is that your BIG bottle of Jack Daniels by that bush , its half full and I'm going to toss it".

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I loved the guy that "bum rushed" me, so I blocked him with my forearm, and then he jumps back and screams, "You assaulted me!" So yeah, I try flashlight and verbal first. The problem is we have to wake them up or else we have to roll an aid car. (Thankfully we aren't authorized or trained to deal with heroin overdoses.)

                    The Jack Daniels comment made me laugh - I throw bottles away because they can be weapons, but other bum stuff I find gets set out in a more visible manner - it disappears within a half hour. Either the owner gets the hint or some other homeless person gets new luggage and clothes.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                      I loved the guy that "bum rushed" me, so I blocked him with my forearm, and then he jumps back and screams, "You assaulted me!" So yeah, I try flashlight and verbal first. The problem is we have to wake them up or else we have to roll an aid car. (Thankfully we aren't authorized or trained to deal with heroin overdoses.)

                      The Jack Daniels comment made me laugh - I throw bottles away because they can be weapons, but other bum stuff I find gets set out in a more visible manner - it disappears within a half hour. Either the owner gets the hint or some other homeless person gets new luggage and clothes.
                      Destroying or throwing out a homeless person's property is a crime and could cause you to face criminal charges, just the same as if they weren't homeless.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

                        Destroying or throwing out a homeless person's property is a crime and could cause you to face criminal charges, just the same as if they weren't homeless.
                        Good point. In training we were told "you do not have ANY 'self help' rights to recover even STOLEN property".

                        LL are legally required to hold "abandoned" stuff for 6 weeks in CA IIRC. Not sure about "hotels".

                        But I'm guessing on private property with "no trespassing" signs duly and legally posted, any "unattended property" can be considered trash and hauled off ASAP.....except maybe cars and even trailers. Another great time to roll video of yourself calling loudly for the owner to claim his "property"/trash.

                        There is a youtube about a House Flipper where someone parks a small trailer and is obviously "stealth living" with windows papered, etc., and the guy is trying to LEGALLY get it removed and getting no where with local cops, tow companies, etc. Mr Flipper is posting notes and even having a note-posting "war". LOL. He doesn't want to just push it out to street and then "call it in" because cops will know its "his" and Mr Flipper would be getting huge "storage lien" bill etc. Eventually, one night it just was gone.

                        PS- NEVER admit any connection or knowledge in any way of any abandoned vehicle OR....semi-stray dog off leash. If car is "out of system" the city will make it your problem if no one else can be found. If you tell Dog Catcher "I know that dog (but its not mine)" it just became yours as far as the ticket.

                        As I always say, "in Security, you are more likely to get fired for doing your job than not doing your job".

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                          \
                          The Jack Daniels comment made me laugh - I throw bottles away because they can be weapons
                          in my case the bottle was purely fictional ruse to trick the bum into showing he was awake. start pouring water on ground to make slashing sounds for tough case.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post

                            Destroying or throwing out a homeless person's property is a crime and could cause you to face criminal charges, just the same as if they weren't homeless.
                            Even if you don't face criminal charges that's asking for police involvement that you don't need.

                            My employer has a very specific protocol for lost and found items. it's not something that I deal with frequently but you can bet that when I do I document the hell out of it and if I can get a supervisor there to witness and take possession of the items I do

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Point(s) taken. We are private property. We do have a lost and found, but with limited space.

                              I make decisions on a case by case basis. If the owner is found and calm, he can take his bottle / bag and go. But I am not turning in lice / scabies infested backpacks or urine soaked suitcases to lost & found - now I'm creating a health hazard and stinking up the office.

                              I have put luggage aside in a secure area and given it back when claimed, with a polite reminder that we are not a storage facility. I understand the homeless have rights. But if you don't live in a city with a massive, roaming homeless addict population that leave their stuff all over because when they get high they can't remember where they put it, you are not aware of the challenges private businesses face.

                              And don't tell me to turn it in to the police - we can't get them for anything other than high value theft or violent crime.
                              Last edited by Condo Guard; 01-10-2019, 02:50 PM.

                              Comment

                              300x250

                              Collapse

                              Mid 300x250

                              Collapse

                              Taboola

                              Collapse

                              Super Leaderboard

                              Collapse
                              Working...
                              X