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A rant on officers who dont do their job.

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  • A rant on officers who dont do their job.

    [removed by OP]
    Last edited by Dynamo; 09-30-2018, 01:44 PM.

  • #2
    Nice rant. I agree.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by ColePhelps1247 View Post
      Nice rant. I agree.
      maybe he could repost a redacted version?

      Comment


      • #4
        Does their lack of performance somehow affect your job duties? If not, I wouldn't lose any sleep over it.

        Comment


        • #5
          To quote Gunny Highway (Clint Eastwood) in Heartbreak Ridge, "Adapt, improvise, overcome." I get stuck regularly with a guard who, for whatever reason, is protected and knows it. 3/4ths of his shift is sitting watching movies or face timing with his girlfriend. I make sure the critical stuff that has to get done (either to protect the property or because its my responsibility) gets done. If I go out on a call I assume I have no back up, because I basically don't.

          It sucks, but its not worth my time to try to get him fired, and if the company feels its cheaper to pay him than fire him, that's on them. If he actually endangers me or someone else than I will consider stirring the pot.

          Like I said on the other thread, I'm kind of embracing the whole security robot thing now. There are a lot of loser guards that will have to get real jobs when AI outperforms their minimal effort.
          Last edited by Condo Guard; 10-01-2018, 07:39 PM.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
            To quote Gunny Highway (Clint Eastwood) in Heartbreak Ridge, "Adapt, improvise, overcome." I get stuck regularly with a guard who, for whatever reason, is protected and knows it. 3/4ths of his shift is sitting watching movies or face timing with his girlfriend. I make sure the critical stuff that has to get done (either to protect the property or because its my responsibility) gets done. If I go out on a call I assume I have no back up, because I basically don't.

            It sucks, but its not worth my time to try to get him fired, and if the company feels its cheaper to pay him than fire him, that's on them. If he actually endangers me or someone else than I will consider stirring the pot.

            Like I said on the other thread, I'm kind of embracing the whole security robot thing now. There are a lot of loser guards that will have to get real jobs when AI outperforms their minimal effort.
            maybe his "protection" is watching you, or at least making sure you are more or less there.

            I've done almost exact same gig. Client told me more or less, "I just want you to make sure these other guys are at least on site, you can do whatever you want otherwise and don't need to do ANYTHING except call me if stuff goes down". Other guys were OK, but he seemed like I was the "one he can trust". Naturally, I took full advantage.

            Funny, some of the most serious problems I've had with fellow guards is those guys that "exceed their orders". Was working a sketchy largely Section 8 apts complex, we'd just taken over from a company that had a crappy rep, and I'd figured out the RepoMen weren't supposed to be allowed to get pass coded driveway gate, and shut them down, making me an instant living legend. Guys were throwing me the Black Power statue. Then I hear about how we need to suddenly get "back up" when doing certain lockups where we get out of car. Turns out one of our Jr Cop Cadet guys was going around walking up on (always women) and shining his big maglight all up in their cars for no real reason.

            Other time, we were SUPPOSED to just "sit and smile" at corp lobby but as soon as I or other guard left this one guy was stopping people, asking for IDs, what doing here, etc. IIRC there was some "suspicious persons" in Post Orders.
            Last edited by Squid; 10-01-2018, 09:57 PM.

            Comment


            • #7
              No, he's not there for me; there's plenty of other ways to track us. I agree that there is the other extreme that also causes problems. People will retaliate against an overbearing guard, and often it isn't the individual, its all the security. The same with those good-hearted souls who on their own go "above and beyond," but fail to realize that once you start delivering the daily newspaper to everybody's office or helping the janitor with vacuuming, the client is going to expect that all the time.

              My biggest problem is that you don't have to do much to look like you are "on the job." At least put your phone down when someone comes into the security office if you aren't on your official break. The only good development with the lazy S/O is he stopped hanging out in the management lunch room for 6 hours, because on weekends we have a few of the suits that come in and get caught up on work, prep for Monday, etc.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Squid View Post

                maybe his "protection" is watching you, or at least making sure you are more or less there.

                I've done almost exact same gig. Client told me more or less, "I just want you to make sure these other guys are at least on site, you can do whatever you want otherwise and don't need to do ANYTHING except call me if stuff goes down". Other guys were OK, but he seemed like I was the "one he can trust". Naturally, I took full advantage.

                Funny, some of the most serious problems I've had with fellow guards is those guys that "exceed their orders". Was working a sketchy largely Section 8 apts complex, we'd just taken over from a company that had a crappy rep, and I'd figured out the RepoMen weren't supposed to be allowed to get pass coded driveway gate, and shut them down, making me an instant living legend. Guys were throwing me the Black Power statue. Then I hear about how we need to suddenly get "back up" when doing certain lockups where we get out of car. Turns out one of our Jr Cop Cadet guys was going around walking up on (always women) and shining his big maglight all up in their cars for no real reason.

                Other time, we were SUPPOSED to just "sit and smile" at corp lobby but as soon as I or other guard left this one guy was stopping people, asking for IDs, what doing here, etc. IIRC there was some "suspicious persons" in Post Orders.
                I think it's very important for clients to tell the guard company/guard manager exactly what they want the guards to do, and for the guards to be clearly informed what is expected of them. For example, even something as simple as "sit at a lobby desk and check passes"; if the guard sees someone they recognize who is not displaying their pass, do they want the guard to

                a) Ask to see their pass,
                b) Say nothing, call the supervisor, and document it or
                c) Simply say nothing and ignore it.

                What if the guard asks to see their pass and the person refuses to show it or ignores the guard? Does the guard then:

                a) Verbally insist again and again, until the person has left the area?
                b) Attempt to block the person from entering (for example, standing in front of the door)?
                c) Physically prevent the person from entering (for example, grabbing them and detaining/arresting them or removing them from the property)?
                d) Do nothing, document it and call the supervisor?
                e) Do nothing, document it and call the police?
                f) Do nothing and document it?

                What about the above situation but the guard doesn't recognize the person?

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Condo Guard View Post
                  To quote Gunny Highway (Clint Eastwood) in Heartbreak Ridge, "Adapt, improvise, overcome." I get stuck regularly with a guard who, for whatever reason, is protected and knows it. 3/4ths of his shift is sitting watching movies or face timing with his girlfriend. I make sure the critical stuff that has to get done (either to protect the property or because its my responsibility) gets done. If I go out on a call I assume I have no back up, because I basically don't.

                  It sucks, but its not worth my time to try to get him fired, and if the company feels its cheaper to pay him than fire him, that's on them. If he actually endangers me or someone else than I will consider stirring the pot.

                  Like I said on the other thread, I'm kind of embracing the whole security robot thing now. There are a lot of loser guards that will have to get real jobs when AI outperforms their minimal effort.
                  I thank the Good Lord when a professional Guard is working with me
                  Makes the night sail along
                  http://www.laurel-and-hardy.com/ Greatest Comedy team ever!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Squid View Post

                    maybe he could repost a redacted version?
                    Probably about sleeping on the job, wearing unauthorized clothing, watching movies when you are supposed to be working, making things up...you know, stuff you do all the time per your posts.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Soper View Post

                      Probably about sleeping on the job, wearing unauthorized clothing, watching movies when you are supposed to be working, making things up...you know, stuff you do all the time per your posts.
                      I'm "authorized" to wear any damn thing I want, as long as company patch is on it. I'm also authorized to sleep and watch movies if I feel like it.

                      They know I got the place "wired", they also know I'm the guy they want on site when stuff DOES pop off, and pop off it does, because they know I handle it "just right"....not too much, not too little.

                      Skillz pay the billz.

                      How many homicide cases you solved after police and DA, and even "general public including media" baffled???
                      Last edited by Squid; 10-05-2018, 09:40 PM.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        In terms of knowing what to say or not say in court, I think it's important to distinguish between the things which could get you (the guard) in legal trouble, and the things which won't hurt you personally but will hurt your employer's/clients/prosecutor's case. Know what can hurt you, and if your employer/client wants you to be able to build a solid legal case then he/she can pay for the training.

                        As a side note, I know that some employers don't pay for their guards to attend court because "it's the court that is making you attend, not us (the employer)". If I'm a guard who's not being paid to attend court, the only way I'm showing up is if I will personally suffer some kind of penalty from the court for not attending.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
                          ...As a side note, I know that some employers don't pay for their guards to attend court because "it's the court that is making you attend, not us (the employer)". If I'm a guard who's not being paid to attend court, the only way I'm showing up is if I will personally suffer some kind of penalty from the court for not attending.
                          Well, interesting that you should post that. Many years ago, when I was a deputy sheriff, the longest three months of my life were when I was assigned to court security. Anyway, during one particular time there was jury selection underway. A young college student was there and being questioned. It was disclosed that he had already gotten excused twice because of his college studies. This time, however, the judge, who I got to know very well, made him stay and serve on the jury. I felt bad for the juror because education is important, but so is jury service. I think the trial was expected to occur during the college final exam week, too.

                          Another time, with a different judge, a jury had been selected. One of the jurors, who owned his own business, was not happy about being selected for jury service. If I recall correctly, since he was a "one man" business, if he didn't work, he didn't get paid. He told the court that, but was selected anyway. The next morning, when the trial was to begin, the juror simply didn't show up for jury service. The judge ordered the sheriff he send a deputy to go get the juror and bring him before the court!

                          When I was in civil process, I went to a business and had a court order for something. The woman at the front desk had obviously been instructed by her boss to not cooperate. I was in civilian clothing, so I called the PD to assist. They show up, but the woman is adamant and uncooperative. I call the courthouse and speak directly with the judge. He simply tells me to bring her before the court forthwith. Needless to say, that started a chain of events that eventually got the business to comply, but some people's stubbornness makes them their own worst enemy.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jim1348 View Post

                            Well, interesting that you should post that. Many years ago, when I was a deputy sheriff, the longest three months of my life were when I was assigned to court security. Anyway, during one particular time there was jury selection underway. A young college student was there and being questioned. It was disclosed that he had already gotten excused twice because of his college studies. This time, however, the judge, who I got to know very well, made him stay and serve on the jury. I felt bad for the juror because education is important, but so is jury service. I think the trial was expected to occur during the college final exam week, too.

                            Another time, with a different judge, a jury had been selected. One of the jurors, who owned his own business, was not happy about being selected for jury service. If I recall correctly, since he was a "one man" business, if he didn't work, he didn't get paid. He told the court that, but was selected anyway. The next morning, when the trial was to begin, the juror simply didn't show up for jury service. The judge ordered the sheriff he send a deputy to go get the juror and bring him before the court!

                            When I was in civil process, I went to a business and had a court order for something. The woman at the front desk had obviously been instructed by her boss to not cooperate. I was in civilian clothing, so I called the PD to assist. They show up, but the woman is adamant and uncooperative. I call the courthouse and speak directly with the judge. He simply tells me to bring her before the court forthwith. Needless to say, that started a chain of events that eventually got the business to comply, but some people's stubbornness makes them their own worst enemy.
                            Yeah, my post was more on the theoretical side. The company I work for now is a responsible one that would pay me if I had to attend court, and would pay for a lawyer if I needed one (assuming I wasn't completely negligent). When I worked for bad companies in the past, I was extra careful to only work contracts where my chances of ending up in court (in any capacity) were minimal.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Do what exactly? most O&R guards are trained to do nothing but be a visual deterrent and document what actually happened. We are lucky that some of the guards can fog up a mirror under their nose and have a pulse. Any kind of drive to be proactive or hell even active in protecting a site has been driven out of most guards in the first month of working. The only universal part of doing security is learning not to screw up. With clients who like to change the rules on a whim, security companies who promise the moon and deliver none of it and the standard line guard who does not give an F due to seeing how backward the industry actually is. Security companies are too busy undercutting the competition to groom for the future. It is a race to the bottom to get the lowest price and highest profit margins on the revolving door that is security employment.
                              Confronted with the choice, the American people would choose the policeman's truncheon over the anarchist's bomb.
                              Spiro Agnew

                              Why yes I am a glorified babysitter , I am here to politely ask you to follow the rules , if not daddy comes to spank you and put you in time out its your choice - Me

                              Luck is a red hair woman , if you ever dated one you know there remarkably dangerous , my personal preference is to be competent and let luck join the ride if she so chooses .- Clint Smith

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