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Britain's first private police force to go nationwide after success in London's

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  • Britain's first private police force to go nationwide after success in London's

    https://www.standard.co.uk/news/uk/b...-a3832321.html

    The force, called My Local Bobby, makes citizens arrests and can gather evidence to launch private prosecutions.

    Clients who pay up to £200-a-month are given a direct line to a local officer, who they can also track on an iPad, and enjoy a meet-and-greet service from Tube stations or cars.

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    inRead invented by Teads

    The scheme, which was set up by former Met officers David McKelvey and Tony Nash, is currently being trialled in Belgravia, Mayfair and Kensington. Founders David McKelvey and Tony Nash are both former Met officers
    In two years, the agency has reportedly achieved more than 400 convictions for fraud, intellectual property theft and other offences.


    Standard - Daily Highlights
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    They now intend to move forces into other cities, as well as rural areas, amid a rising demand for the officers. The force is being trialled in Belgravia, Mayfair and Kensington (Getty Images)
    Mr McKelvey told the Sunday Express: “You don’t see policemen walk around the streets any more. If you call 101 it’s a 30-minute wait and it is not a police officer who answers.

    “My Local Bobby is basically taking things back to Dixon of Dock Green-style policing.” My Local Bobby: meet the brave new world of elite law enforcement
    The officers, who wear distinctive red caps and bibs, have regularly moved on drug users and drunks from central London neighbourhoods.

    A spokesman for the Met police said: “We would encourage residents who have concerns about policing in their area to contact their local Safer Neighbourhoods Team.

    “There are dedicated officers working in every ward across the capital. Where organisations or communities wish to fund their own security patrols we will work with these personnel in the most appropriate way to prevent and detect crime.

    “Any reports of crime and evidence provided to the Met by a third party will always be assessed and dealt with in the most appropriate way.” More about: | London | Police

  • #2
    Just a trumped up guard/escort service. The part about secret crime history access is stupid. All arrests processed have a criminal history charge sheet attached. These guys are just vending smoke.

    Comment


    • #3
      An interesting concept; it appears that the company has had some success using former police officers to privately investigate and prosecute financial crimes and intellectual property theft. Here's my concerns, though:

      1) It appears that individuals will be able to pay to have private patrols in their area. Since the patrols will of course also take place in front of "non-paying" properties, what's the incentive for individuals to be the one to pay? For example, say a street has 20 houses. If houses 1, 3, 7,8, 12 and 17 pay for the service, the officer will end up patrolling the entire street, providing a deterrence effect for all the houses.

      2) It says that each subscriber will have a direct line to a specific officer, and can track their movements via ipad. What if that officer is busy with something? Do they get to call another officer?

      3) By law the officers are cannot be equipped with any defensive weapons. That makes it more dangerous to detain/arrest offenders. Is the service going to expect the officers to do things which are unsafe, or will they be expected to stand by and call the (public) police? It it's the latter I can imagine a lot of situations where subscribers get upset that they pay for a "private police" service and still have to wait for the "real police".

      4) The police usually work in pairs or call for backup when entering a situation where conflict can be expected. Will these officers do the same or will they be expected to do it solo? In earlier reference to point 2, how will subscribers feel when "their" officer is pulled from his route to assist another?

      5) The powers of private citizens on public property is quite limited. On private property, property owners and their agents bascially have the power of "Do as I say or get off my property". On public property they don't have that authority. There's also the fact thst private officers don't have the power to investigate suspected crimes.

      6) Who are they going to get to do this job? Right now the company is made up of former police, but they were mostly acting as private investigators. It's not that hard to find former police officers who are willing to take a plainclothers 9-5, M-F job in an office. They'll propably evwn we willing to do it for less money. Good luck finding former police officers who are willing to work on the streets, doing shift work, wearing a goofy uniform and​​​​​​ dealing with the same kind of crap as police but for less pay....

      Comment


      • #4
        Good points, Console. It reminds me of the anecdotal stories of volunteer fire departments that had a yearly fee - if you didn't subscribe, you didn't get service.

        At least one neighborhood in Seattle has their own private patrol, although their authority is limited. It is a direct response to the the city council's policy of "hands off" towards homelessness and petty crimes. IIRC they are unarmed and mostly O & R except in certain instances.

        You may see more of this in the U.S., especially with retail. If cities won't respond to or prosecute property crimes (shoplifting, fraud, etc.) then merchants really have no option except to pursue matters in civil court, or raise their price point to cover increasing losses and risk losing customers.

        Comment


        • #5
          UK and especially London has become an off-colour (note British spelling) joke. Rapists go free but an Englishman gets prison for making a joke or comment.

          No idea what "‘ And, if necessary, they can bring a private prosecution (that is, one brought by a private individual not acting on behalf of the police). " that means in UK legal system.

          IIRC the big Alan Dershowitz/Claus Von Bulo case begin with his dead wife's family PRIVATELY HIRING the DA to make the charges, which is (was?) fully legal in some States (back East only IIRC).

          Mentioned something about a lot of "Intellectual Property Theft" cases. What is all THAT about? Counterfeit goods sold to tourists?

          Big Picture: This is another example of why I'm restarting my Security career. More and more, for a host of reasons, the richer public is unable to get protection from police and are turning to Private Security aka "hired guns". I see that only increasing, in USA and elsewhere. I'd bet that in 5 yrs an "American Security Background" will be the ticket to a good job in Europe, where as in the past it was "Silicon Valley" or "Hollywood" experience, background and connections that were in demand.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
            ​​​​​​ dealing with the same kind of crap as police but for less pay....
            They wont be required to babysit every dirtbag like the real cops, which should massively reduce stress and risk.

            I don't think I'd be able the stress of dealing with all the hopeless loser not-gonna-get-better situations I see cops have to respond to. Semi-retarded abusive parents that never should've had kids, and there is really nothing you can do.

            Comment


            • #7
              Squid,

              Unless your SIA, you won't be working in the UK. What makes you more qualified than the UK and EU security guys who are more than able to do the job?

              You should concentrate on just trying to do the job you get paid for here...

              Comment


              • #8
                I think where they do wrong is trying to suggest that they can be an alternative to the public ("real") police. I'm a fan of neighbourhood watches (if done right) and offering professional neighbourhood watches seems like a good idea. They can be a supplement to the police and develop a collaborative relationship with them.

                Imagine a small fleet of unmarked neighbourhood watch cars, each armed with a direct line to the police, binoculars and 50 megapixel cameras with zoom lenses. I think that potential burglars and other criminals would be seriously deterred if they considered the very real possibility that tbe car down the street was manned by someone who was calling the police and had taken a binch of really good pictures of them....

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by Consolewatcher View Post
                  I think where they do wrong is trying to suggest that they can be an alternative to the public ("real") police. I'm a fan of neighbourhood watches (if done right) and offering professional neighbourhood watches seems like a good idea. They can be a supplement to the police and develop a collaborative relationship with them.

                  Imagine a small fleet of unmarked neighbourhood watch cars, each armed with a direct line to the police, binoculars and 50 megapixel cameras with zoom lenses. I think that potential burglars and other criminals would be seriously deterred if they considered the very real possibility that tbe car down the street was manned by someone who was calling the police and had taken a binch of really good pictures of them....
                  already being done in Oakland, CA, although its far from "collaborative".

                  Its basically the richer White folks fed up with local police and refusing to pay to hire more cops who don't and won't protect their neighborhoods from actual criminals.....so they've started hiring their own Armed Security, and its been very cost effective, according to my local RE agent experts.

                  My local contacts in Security who work these beats say their seems to be an unofficial "non-co-operation" policy by OPD. Most anywhere else if a Security Guard wants to tell a cop something the cops are more than happy to listen, but in "Jokeland" the cops give these Neighborhood Security guys attitude about "you will need to make a report" but wont "take a report" on the spot.

                  "unmarked neighbourhood watch cars, each armed with a direct line to the police,.......who was calling the police" LOL "calling the police" in Oakland to report a STOLEN CAR means you might be waiting a day OR MORE for cops to actually show to take a report. Bonus, and I'm not making this up....UNTIL the "report is taken" they cops DO NOT put out any BOLO for your car, plates, anything. The fact you just told the 911 operator your lic plate etc MEANS NOTHING. Do you think the cops will do ANYTHING for a report of "suspicious person"??? Mah Boyz in Jokeland tell me its all about "visual deterrence" and shining a nice big spotlight up in the face of anyone who "don't look right for the neighborhood".

                  http://america.aljazeera.com/article...typatrols.html

                  """Last September, two men, ages 17 and 22, held commuters at the Rockridge train station at gunpoint and robbed seven people of their laptops, smartphones and cash. That was the last straw for Paul Liu, a Google economist who lives in the neighborhood. Liu set up a fundraising page on the crowdfunding site CrowdTilt. Within a few hours, he had reached his $8,200 goal; in total, online campaigns have raised $90,000 for private patrols in Rockridge.Liu compared the rates of robberies and burglaries in the five months since private patrols began with the rate of incidents over a “baseline” period of four weeks before the patrols started, and found they had dropped by 43 percent.........

                  However, two sociology professors, Hiroshi Fukurai with the University of California, Santa Cruz, and Traci Schlesinger with DePaul University, say the reduction that Liu’s study found is “statistically insignificant,” because of the short time frame of his baseline period."""

                  LMAO! Folks, I've taken college Statistics (with Calculus!) and in MY opinion a month is an OK baseline for something like robbery/burglary because that is something those people do all year long on steady basis.

                  "Google economist" VS "UC sociology professors"? One will get instantly fired if his math is lacking in anyway, and the other are fruitcakes who twist everything into their anti-American agenda.

                  I'm guessing that Mr Liu's private patrols, with their 43% drop in crime for $90K, are AT LEAST 20x more COST EFFECTIVE than hiring more police.




                  Yeah, this is why I'm re-starting my career in Security.
                  Last edited by Squid; 05-13-2018, 03:58 PM.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    More anti LE blurb from someone who has zero clue as to the real world. Your “opinion “ is faulty and based on assumptions...which you should also have been taught. You are an EPIC FAIL in everything you post.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      The problem is that at a time when crime is increasing (I don't care what the "official" reports say), LE is losing funding and manpower. Seattle's problem is exacerbated by a city council that is so clueless it really is criminal in itself.

                      I have no problem with filing reports online; I don't need to physically speak with an officer for a petty crime where the suspect is long gone. I think what frustrates people (and causes them to not report, which is how you get these stories of crime being down) is the perceived lack of follow up.

                      Don't be mad at law enforcement, Squid. This is a lousy time to be a cop. Negative press reports, long hours and diminishing resources. We now expect the police to deal with hordes of the mentally ill, the walking heroin dead, and a whole generation of petty crooks honing their skills with internet tutorials and iphone tips / alerts. It really is a nightmare out there.

                      Every cop I've met has been professional. They are human; some are not as bright as others, some have bad days, etc. But they all really want to protect and help people, just like us. Keep that in mind.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Soper View Post
                        More anti LE blurb from someone who has zero clue as to the real world. Your “opinion “ is faulty and based on assumptions...which you should also have been taught. You are an EPIC FAIL in everything you post.
                        I get all my stuff first hand from fellow guard actually working these beats in Oakland, and I work various sites in Oakland and surrounding, and I've lived in West Oakland recently, had car stolen in Oakland, recently. I'm as real world as it gets.

                        IMO its not average street cops at fault for being useless, its "policy". Check out new/current OPD chief of police....hired by the woman mayor who tipped off gang members on the ICE raids...nuff said.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          From someone else isn't "first hand". Any story from a security guard is suspect, as we've all seen from your "firsthand " reports how exaggerated they always are when you post them on here. Your "real world" is a fantasy which you reside in. Your stories are made up tripe.

                          You guard dirt piles in between naps while you are "at work." Since those piles aren't hotbeds of crime, you don't have any concept of security work beyond that.

                          Since you know absolutely ZERO about LE, any comments you make regarding it or your opinion are automatically discounted.

                          You just keep making yourself look like the fool you are.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Soper View Post
                            From someone else isn't "first hand". Any story from a security guard is suspect, as we've all seen from your "firsthand " reports how exaggerated they always are when you post them on here. Your "real world" is a fantasy which you reside in. Your stories are made up tripe.

                            You guard dirt piles in between naps while you are "at work." Since those piles aren't hotbeds of crime, you don't have any concept of security work beyond that.

                            Since you know absolutely ZERO about LE, any comments you make regarding it or your opinion are automatically discounted.

                            You just keep making yourself look like the fool you are.
                            axe anyone in SF or Oak "projects". If there is a cop posted in his car, and gunfire breaks out, they will (by policy) burn rubber and bail out with all due haste and then ONLY come back once they gather up lots of other cops.

                            Of course, getting all those other cops and "planning" takes AT LEAST 15 minutes, which is enough time to be 1/2 across town.

                            There was some "community (whatever)" a couple years back in Oakland because according to residents the cops had nearly hit kids several times when bugging out when shots are heard.

                            If a "private" Security for "housing" left his post just because of hearing a few gunshots he'd be fired.

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