Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Databases

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    This is an interesting topic, and one I have concerns with.

    We all know that our jobs mirror that of a LEO, but we are not allowed the same information as they are. The crappy part of that is they almost always check to see if the person they are contacting is wanted. We don't have that luxory. I am not so much concerned about arresting a person on an outstanding warrant as I am about knowing that this person who I am contacting at 0345hrs, under a bridge, living out of a car, has a history of violence towards law enforcement. Or flagged as a mentally ill person with violent tendancies. Basically, I see it as a Officer Safety Handicap. They have it, we don't.

    I have seen this time and time again i my area. I have had contacts with people and I have deemed it above my level and contact the police. When they arrive right out of the box they run him/her and find out the person is wanted or flagged as dangerous they tell me that wasn't very smart thing to do... As if I knew the subject was even flagged...
    This is something that ALOT of security officers tend to forget. I make it my first priority to DRILL into ones head about officer safety. It's quite simple, you shoot or assault & batter a police officer, you have the world hunting your arse down. You do the same to a security officer, you'll be hunted, but not anywhere close to the same fashion as a police officer.

    I've actually called the police non-emergency number and had them run names for me if I felt like I may have someone I need more information about. they actually will run the name for me, and either say "everything is negative, or if they are wanted they will simply ask "where are you?" which in turn means the person is wanted. I am sure not every police deprtment would do such things for security. Also, the sharing of information can be a major pain in the arse as valley stated. Yes, our MAIN job function is to "observe and report", but one would be a complete moron to think that there are times and situations where security must handle a situation or go hands on. The police department use to love a former company I worked for, because we would handle our own situations, and handle minor calls for them. Security that calls often to "BS" get no respect from law enforcement. So, sometimes we're damned if we do, and damned if we don't. In essence.. GO HOME EVERYNIGHT NOT MATTER WHAT, if confused, nervous, etc..leave it alone.

    Leave a comment:


  • Chadly
    replied
    Originally posted by ValleyOne
    This is an interesting topic, and one I have concerns with.

    We all know that our jobs mirror that of a LEO, but we are not allowed the same information as they are. The crappy part of that is they almost always check to see if the person they are contacting is wanted. We don't have that luxory. I am not so much concerned about arresting a person on an outstanding warrant as I am about knowing that this person who I am contacting at 0345hrs, under a bridge, living out of a car, has a history of violence towards law enforcement. Or flagged as a mentally ill person with violent tendancies. Basically, I see it as a Officer Safety Handicap. They have it, we don't.

    I have seen this time and time again i my area. I have had contacts with people and I have deemed it above my level and contact the police. When they arrive right out of the box they run him/her and find out the person is wanted or flagged as dangerous they tell me that wasn't very smart thing to do... As if I knew the subject was even flagged...
    I think as far as being "flagged" for officer safety issues really only occurs to my knowledge on a specific police departments CAD system, due to prior contacts. Ive seen CIBR's and have not seen any "flags" that say use caution etc etc, UNLESS that person has a specific want for a weapon related offense i.e. armed Robbery.

    Here is a link to the Wisconsin Database site I mentioned:
    http://wcca.wicourts.gov/index.xsl

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    This is an interesting topic, and one I have concerns with.

    We all know that our jobs mirror that of a LEO, but we are not allowed the same information as they are. The crappy part of that is they almost always check to see if the person they are contacting is wanted. We don't have that luxory. I am not so much concerned about arresting a person on an outstanding warrant as I am about knowing that this person who I am contacting at 0345hrs, under a bridge, living out of a car, has a history of violence towards law enforcement. Or flagged as a mentally ill person with violent tendancies. Basically, I see it as a Officer Safety Handicap. They have it, we don't.

    I have seen this time and time again i my area. I have had contacts with people and I have deemed it above my level and contact the police. When they arrive right out of the box they run him/her and find out the person is wanted or flagged as dangerous they tell me that wasn't very smart thing to do... As if I knew the subject was even flagged...

    Leave a comment:


  • Chadly
    replied
    Wisconsin also has a similar thing, called CCAP. You can look up and see what people have been arrested for.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    replied
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I would welcome such a data base, especially for plate checks. Even if an access fee is charged, it still would be helpful. For example, I run the plate of a vehicle that is trespassing on my site. I'm going to feel more comfortable approaching it if there are no hits. I know that nothing is 100% accurate or up-to-date. Some information is better than no information.
    Yes, I am using it in the patrol sense, not applicant screening.

    The Maryland Court database is pretty up to date as it updates everyday at 8am. The DMV system also updates daily and proves to be quite accurate. Sad part is that the charge is $9.00 per hit. So if you're not careful, might have to take out a loan to pay the bill. haha

    Leave a comment:


  • james2go30
    replied
    hey

    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    I would welcome such a data base, especially for plate checks. Even if an access fee is charged, it still would be helpful. For example, I run the plate of a vehicle that is trespassing on my site. I'm going to feel more comfortable approaching it if there are no hits. I know that nothing is 100% accurate or up-to-date. Some information is better than no information.
    I have to agree with you. Know what ya mean.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mr. Security
    replied
    I would welcome such a data base, especially for plate checks. Even if an access fee is charged, it still would be helpful. For example, I run the plate of a vehicle that is trespassing on my site. I'm going to feel more comfortable approaching it if there are no hits. I know that nothing is 100% accurate or up-to-date. Some information is better than no information.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    I think he's using it in the patrol sense, not the applicant screening sense.
    Gotcha...thanks!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    We use some, but only as a "first cut", so to speak. That is, you can rule someone OUT if they show a particular type of conviction, etc. that would disqualify them. However, you cannot rule people IN just because nothing adverse shows up.

    Databases cannot be trusted as a source of final resort - even the ones maintained by public agencies. Time after time, it's been proven that it literally takes a physical visit to relevant courthouses, PDs, etc. to guarantee that you're getting the best, and particularly the most current, information. Even many public databases suffer from a lack of people to make data entries and from erroneous entries.
    I think he's using it in the patrol sense, not the applicant screening sense.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    We use some, but only as a "first cut", so to speak. That is, you can rule someone OUT if they show a particular type of conviction, etc. that would disqualify them. However, you cannot rule people IN just because nothing adverse shows up.

    Databases cannot be trusted as a source of final resort - even the ones maintained by public agencies. Time after time, it's been proven that it literally takes a physical visit to relevant courthouses, PDs, etc. to guarantee that you're getting the best, and particularly the most current, information. Even many public databases suffer from a lack of people to make data entries and from erroneous entries.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 02-27-2007, 02:48 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • BadBoynMD
    started a topic Databases

    Databases

    Hey everyone,

    I'm new to the boards, but a veteran in the industry.

    I'm curious as to if anyone uses any type of database for criminal history, wanted or stolen vehicles? The state of Maryland's court website has a way to look up people that are in the Maryland court system for free. It's pretty awesome, because it will provide if a person is on probation, wanted and a few other details. The Maryland Vehicle Administration (DMV) also, but for a fee per hit will provide a vehicle and drivers license information. If a vehicle is stolen it will indicate that as well. Sad part is it's only for Maryland and in my area you have plenty of out of state tags.

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X