Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

PPO exam

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • gonzo1510
    replied
    I am going through Emblem Empire. I believe they handle most PD's out here in CA. They can help you if you have a rough sketch of what you want to do.

    http://www.eeiemblems.com/

    Leave a comment:


  • mbmx13
    replied
    Thanks for the info and the quick response, I will use your suggestions.

    I appreciate it!

    Raymond A. Miller III
    Pres-CEO
    Intelligent Ops International, Inc.
    Security and Investigative Service

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by mbmx13
    I got the letter from BSIS and they told me that they won't issue my PPO number until I submit my arm patch and badge design.

    Are there any places that someone has had a pleasant experience dealing with that can design a professional arm patch? I was thinking that I would just get a decent looking one for now and then work on getting a more professional one at a later date, any thoughts? suggestions?

    Thanks for all your thoughts and suggestions,

    Raymond A. Miller III
    Pres-CEO
    Intelligent Ops International, Inc.
    Security and Investigative Services
    In order of preference:
    www.symbolarts.com <- Excellent design, free artwork, nice patches.
    www.qmuniforms.com <- Their "semi-custom" patches are not cheaper.
    www.galls.com <- Good artwork, semi-fast turnaround.
    www.uniforms4all.com <- They want 100 bucks for artwork, but patches are cheap.

    What I'd usually do is spec a patch in-house, then ship it to Symbol Arts who would then re-do the patch in Illustrator, which the manufacturer needs to create an embroidery file off of. This is free, and they will send you confirmation artwork.

    Quartermaster offers custom patches, and semi-custom. Do the math, for the price of a semi-custom, you can get a full custom patch. You will need to buy at least 50 patches with most places, and you will most likely have to re-submit patch artwork for any changes to BSIS.

    Uniform Warehouse (Uniforms4all) also does really cheap badges that start at 30 dollars a badge, semi-custom (you tell em what to put on it, they put it), and have CA legal seals, as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbmx13
    replied
    I got the letter from BSIS and they told me that they won't issue my PPO number until I submit my arm patch and badge design.

    Are there any places that someone has had a pleasant experience dealing with that can design a professional arm patch? I was thinking that I would just get a decent looking one for now and then work on getting a more professional one at a later date, any thoughts? suggestions?

    Thanks for all your thoughts and suggestions,

    Raymond A. Miller III
    Pres-CEO
    Intelligent Ops International, Inc.
    Security and Investigative Services

    Leave a comment:


  • gonzo1510
    replied
    Congrats on passing your exams...If you have already paid the fees and have done the Livescan then BSIS already has the results. You should be able to call within a week or two and get your PPO number over the phone, the certificate and your wallet card will get to you about a week or two after. Don't check the website as they update it once a week.

    Leave a comment:


  • mbmx13
    replied
    I took the test for PI and PPO a month or so ago. All I did was study the reference materials that the Prometrics study guide said to study.

    To be honest, I really didn't study as much as I should but I was surprised at how easy both tests came to me.

    For the PI test I had to research the different types of investigations such as: sub Rosa, Subrogation, AOE/COE, etc. in addtion but for the PPO test, there was no need to study any other subjects.

    I am kind of a freak of nature when it comes to learning because all I do is read and exercise. That is kind of a weird combo but it works for me!

    IMHO, study the references Prometric says to study and you will pass.

    Ray

    Leave a comment:


  • GordonSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by gonzo1510
    The organization that does the actual testing is Thompson Prometric.

    California BSIS is the licensing agency for security companies/guards.

    Aside from that, know that there is a conifdentiality clause from Thompson and the state, so your questions cannot be answered.

    Besides, the test is real easy, just read your study guides and remember the test you took to get your guard card and you should be fine.
    There is a confidentiality clause from Thompson and the state. I did not sign a confidentiality clause. Secondly, a friend of mine failed the test. Thompson refused to tell him which questions were answered wrong. They told him he has to research the answers for himself. He called BSIS, and they told him to pay for additional classess to learn the material. The classes were $200-$400. What's the difference between getting answers from an instructor, or getting answers here?

    Leave a comment:


  • gonzo1510
    replied
    The organization that does the actual testing is Thompson Prometric.

    California BSIS is the licensing agency for security companies/guards.

    Aside from that, know that there is a conifdentiality clause from Thompson and the state, so your questions cannot be answered.

    Besides, the test is real easy, just read your study guides and remember the test you took to get your guard card and you should be fine.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by Eric
    Anyone have a link to the organization overseeing the PPO designation?
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&ct=re...mNWWSln4TgeAtg

    BSIS.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Originally posted by GordonSecurity
    I am about to take the PPO exam.
    Anyone have a link to the organization overseeing the PPO designation?

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Originally posted by Chucky
    I have been instructed even if someone grabs their chest and falls on the floor 5 feet in front of me then not only am I not allowed to assist but am to go into hyper vigalant mode as it could very well be an orchestrated distraction.
    This is a fairly common directive in certain very high-security/sensitivity locations where the security force is to undertake no activities that would divert them from that single mission of providing security. Usually, there will be supplemental orders as to who should be notified immediately to address the (possible) medical emergency and that's the limit of what the security force will do.

    Even in locations where the security requirements aren't as high, it's a good question: You're on post and someone runs in shouting "Fire!", pointing to the parking lot. Do you abandon your post and run out into the parking lot? Well, in some posts you might be expected to respond, and in others not. The real problem is that most post orders don't have the level of detail that would address the problem and default to "officer judgement" - which everyone will then criticize later, of course!

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    ??? The answers to several of these questions will depend entirely on your post orders - for instance, question #2 regarding the vehicle entering a gated community. Some post orders would require the officer to remain at the gate and notify the police. Others might not. Ditto with respect to what you are expected to do in the event of an earthquake or a fire alarm. Some buildings require evacuation in the event of any alarm. Others require evacuation of the floor involved, and the floors immediately above and below the alarm floor. Still others require the officer to investigate the alarm and, if feasible, extinguish a small fire. In most cases, "notify the fire department" is Job One.

    Other questions like the one about a hazmat spill are very situational. What type of spill, how much, what's the life hazard, and what kind of facility is this? Does the security officer have hazmat training and how is he expected to respond according to post orders? Many industrial facilities have their own hazmat teams, for instance, who would be notified first. Again, however, in most other situations the fire department would be the appropriate public first responders for hazmat incidents, and should be notified immediately.

    The question about who would prosecute if an officer "neglects" to complete an I-9 form is simply silly - no one would prosecute anyone under that scenario. First, the employer is responsible for completing this form, even when they give the form to the employee to fill out as a convenience to themselves. Second, such oversights happen every single day of the week. The company would simply be notified by USCIS/DHS to remedy the defect. However, technically it is true that the employer could face both civil and criminal penalties if there was a habit or a pattern of permitting people to start work without completing and submitting I-9 forms.

    Other questions seem incomplete - i.e., the question about "electronic cards". However, we'll assume these are access control cards that are used in conjunction with local card readers. Regarding such cards, the (main) job of someone who is "in charge" of the cards is to maintain strict control over their issuance (issuing them only according to pre-established procedures)and to oversee their timely retrieval when they are to be revoked or expire. Even though a card has expired and hence is "no good", it must be retrieved as it could be used by someone with a certain level of technical expertise to create a new "good" one. This individual must also maintain strict security over the inventory of unissued cards. In the case of sophisticated systems, he might also be expected to monitor a reporting console that provides information about when and where access is attempted using the cards. Finally, the individual in charge of these cards might also be responsible for seeing to it that revoked/expired and defective cards are properly disposed of (destroyed, etc.) in a prescribed manner.

    If these are "objective" type questions where you are expected to select an answer, please provide the answer choices so that we can at least advise you on which one would be the most likely or the most common response for most situations.
    Last edited by SecTrainer; 02-26-2007, 09:11 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    Fair enough. Thanks for answering my Q.

    Leave a comment:


  • GordonSecurity
    replied
    These Are Practice Questions For Which They Don't Provide Answers. You Have To Research The Answers For Yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • ValleyOne
    replied
    Originally posted by GordonSecurity
    I am about to take the PPO exam. Can someone kindly answer the following questions?

    1. If a PPO neglects to complete an I-9 form, who can prosecute?

    2. A car enters a gated community without your permission. How should you respond?

    3. What is the first thing you should do in the event of an earthquake?

    4. What is the first thing you should do if a fire alarm is pulled?

    5. If there is a Hazardous spill, who should you call?

    6. What's the first thing you should do if a person is unconcious?

    7. What is a life safety worker? What kind of equipment does he use?

    Thanks in advance
    Are these actual questions from the exam? They sound like they would be. In that case aren't you suppose to answer them yourself based upon your knowledge and experience?

    Please clarify...

    Leave a comment:

Leaderboard

Collapse
Working...
X