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Site supervisors.

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  • james2go30
    replied
    yup

    Yup...but only captains do site to site...like area supervisors...each site is broke down into Lt. (site supervisor) senior sgt. (assistant site supervisor) sgt. and then the blue shirt s/o's.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Is your company the type that makes each post an island with its own Captain, Sergeants, and Guards?

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  • james2go30
    replied
    yea

    They done told me I would handle schedules, write ups(if needed) etc. I just this is going to interesting...which I have previous management experience and experience dealing with people on all levels...still I wanna do a good job.

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  • 11B/PMC
    replied
    Good point from N.A.

    I'll add: If your employer tells you to nix the files all together, that employer is not up to speed on security liability issues, or simply untrustworthy in the field.

    If you keep honest files, unbeknownst to your employer, than do exactly that. keep them private and honest. If you have to take the stand, in your own defense, against an employer who is hanging you out to dry, the truth will always be an absolute defense. No jury will convict you of wrongdoing, especially violating company policy, if the facts (security reports and notes are generally considered legal documents) support your case.

    Example; You have written documentation concerning an incident that occurred while you were on duty. Regardless of the incident, or person(s) involved, most judges will assume the S/O with accurate, detailed and written evidence about the incident is probably in the right. 1) Guilty people usually don't document their actions of wrongdoing. 2) An S/O with something to hide is probably not going to keep a written record. 3) You can't get jail-time for not following company policy.

    So, my advice, keep the records. If your employer says no, you say "Yes Sir/Ma'am," and keep the notes anyway. Loosing your job is a lot less traumatic than loosing your freedom.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Make sure that you are authorized to do the above, too. The company I worked for fired a "site supervisor" for keeping files on employees. Discipline was handled exclusively by the patrol supervisor. You did not keep files, nor did you schedule. You were basically there because the client wanted a "supervisor."

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  • 11B/PMC
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Did they give you a job description for the supervisor position? I ask because with many companies in Florida, "site supervisor" means "day guard."
    or: "guy who has to cover for any and all call-offs"

    I would request a copy your company's "site supervisor policy" and start memorizing. If there isn't an existing policy, you're taking a risk. S/O's who get jammed up in court love to use those famous words "That's what my supervisor told me to do."

    Be prepared to spend your free time at work. Become a site expert. Develop a contact list for everyone from property manager to janitor (always stay on good terms with the janitors and maint. crews).

    Develop a file for each and every S/O under your care. Contacts (including next-of-kin), performance notes (important especially if the S/O gets fired and blames you), hours worked, training received (very important to document all on-site training) , etc., etc., etc.

    Read every line of every report by every one of your S/O's. If they do it wrong, correct the problem and document the training. Always try to have another supervisor present if you have to council an S/O for bad performance. Become an expert at covering your butt. When one of your S/O's has to testify, you should be there as well. Most of the time, you won't have a choice, because an S/O who may be going down won't want to do it alone! Congratulations on the promotion and good luck.
    Last edited by 11B/PMC; 02-08-2007, 04:14 PM.

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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Did they give you a job description for the supervisor position? I ask because with many companies in Florida, "site supervisor" means "day guard."
    Sounds like me! Our department is so small that I cover one of the shifts alone. (I am also supervsior for 2 more hotels however _) I consider myself a Player/Coach.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Did they give you a job description for the supervisor position? I ask because with many companies in Florida, "site supervisor" means "day guard."

    Leave a comment:


  • james2go30
    replied
    yea

    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    Good supervision requires training. There is a distinct body of knowledge that all supervisors need - if for no other reason than the many legal implications of the job (you've no idea how easy it is to violate federal and state laws when you're a supervisor!), specific techniques (for instance, how to do employee reviews properly, how to terminate and discipline employees) and the established principles of organizational behavior (for instance, principles and techniques of team building, delegation, mentoring, etc.) that you should understand if you are to be effective.

    The days are long gone when supervisors can merely be "promoted" into such roles by handing them a list of tips and platitudes. Find and take a good course in supervision. Obviously, this should be supplied by your company, but it doesn't sound like it is, which is very bad business practice on the part of any company.
    Yea been the assistant site supervisor on the site I am now for awhile...the old supervisor at the site I am going to is supposed to train me at that site before I take his place but still not sure of the big differenc in site supervisor and assistant site supervisor...I mean know the difference but not the "difference" if you know what I mean. Just want to do a good job.

    Leave a comment:


  • SecTrainer
    replied
    Good supervision requires training. There is a distinct body of knowledge that all supervisors need - if for no other reason than the many legal implications of the job (you've no idea how easy it is to violate federal and state laws when you're a supervisor!), specific techniques (for instance, how to do employee reviews properly, how to terminate and discipline employees) and the established principles of organizational behavior (for instance, principles and techniques of team building, delegation, mentoring, etc.) that you should understand if you are to be effective.

    The days are long gone when supervisors can merely be "promoted" into such roles by handing them a list of tips and platitudes. Find and take a good course in supervision. Obviously, this should be supplied by your company, but it doesn't sound like it is, which is very bad business practice on the part of any company.

    Leave a comment:


  • Eric
    replied
    Congrats on the new role, I spent 3 years in that role to 17 people, learned alot about human nature and myself...

    If / when you get a complaint concerning a member of your team, get both points of view before making any rulings.

    Be fair with expectations and treat all the same.

    Groom someone (or more) to take your place one day (or 2 weeks, forever, etc)

    Act the way you want your people to act, players often replicate the coach.

    Have some fun, and do not always take the job home.

    Leave a comment:


  • james2go30
    started a topic Site supervisors.

    Site supervisors.

    Alright. Just got promoted to site supervisor...anyone here ever done the site supervisor gig at a resort..condo's hotels etc....drop me some pointers if ya don't mind.

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