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  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    In Montreal to report a crime where there is no suspect present, the victim must go to the police station to file the report. The aim is to keep police available to respond to serious crime & not tie them up writting reports for insurance companies. This means for example, that when the bank returns a traveller's cheque as being counterfeit I have to go to the police station to file the report. Since I also cover a regular shift it can not be during my working hours, I have to go when off duty & am not paid.

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    Sir you are right... Pride doesnt pay the bills.. But satisfaction of doing the right thing helps us sleep at night so that we may continue to pay the bills! LOL.. Bust em away!

    I still pay all of my officers while under employ of my department, and to top it off, the courts pay them as well.. So they love it! And to add to it, if they find training outside of what we offer, that would benefit them in their service, I give them the time off paid!

    I do wish I could pay past employees who ave to attend, but thats kind of out of parameters. I must say though, if a former employee was the arresting officer, the prosecutor will substitute the former employee with a current one. We have enough reports to cover it!

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  • grussem
    replied
    I personally think that if the company was a decent company they'd pay him. I have friends that have long since gone to other LE agencies or left LE altogether and our agency still paid them for going to court for cases they picked up while in their employ. It's just the right thing to do. If paying your brother the $100 or $200 dollars or whatever it would equal out to show up for court is such a big deal to them they're probably some fly by night company and it's a good thing your brother does not work for them anymore.

    Oh, and MallDirector:

    "Tell your brother to look at this like its Jury duty, and the pride he gets to keep because he is doing the right thing!"

    Sorry, but pride don't pay the bills!
    Just busting your chops.

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  • mh892
    replied
    I work in Florida most of the time. We get time and a half for court time.

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  • security steve
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    Why would he be fired?
    If he did not intervene in the fights and subsequently involve local LE, he would have been fired for not performing his duties. He could have easily ignored the call about the fight and gone on his merry way, but he chose to do his job as stated in post orders and resolve all conflicts according to policy.

    If the officers still employed get paid for court, so should the ones who don't.

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  • Miguel
    replied
    Originally posted by N. A. Corbier
    There's no real reason to pay an employee for going to court.
    I disagree. Since the direct reason he´s got to go to court (losing some of HIS free time) it´s the service he´s providing to the company, it´s not just something between him and the court. The company has a moral duty to compensate him for the time he spends in court.

    Fortunately in Spain it´s not just a moral duty but a legal one. An employer has to give a paid leave in some cases of justified absence, testifying in court among them.

    My company policy it´s usually to give the day off and pay a flat fee of 4 hours.

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  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by security steve
    How is that? He is required to go to court as a direct result of his activities in his job. If he did not perform those duties, he would have been fired. If he was still working for the company, he would have been paid. He went to court on behalf of the company. If he didn't go, they could lose the case and then be sued. Every company I have worked for has paid for court.

    A decent company would pay for the time he spent in court on their behalf. In fact, he had to leave his other job on a three hour lunch break (without pay) and drive to court to testify. I think there is something wrong with this picture. Also, most companies require their officers to testify in court when needed.
    Why would he be fired? Other than "at-will." If your job description does not state "you will go to court," then there's no grounds to be fired if you simply do not go. Of course, you HAVE to go. But, your job is to "patrol" or "guard" something, not go to court.

    I have never seen a company in Florida that pays for your court time. That's between You and the State of ____________, not the company. The company was not called to testify, the individual was.

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  • Mr. Security
    replied
    Next time your brother goes to court w/o compensation, he should say: "I don't recall. Sorry."

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  • Mall Director
    replied
    Your brother is out of luck, sorry to say.

    The deal is that, yes he performed a service while employed with the company. Now that he is no longer working there, he has no obligation to the previous employer (unless contract stipulates differently) and the employer has no obligation to him. But because he provided a public safety service, the court system which is not part of the employer, has required him to appear. This is an issue he would have to take up with the court, not the previous employer and good luck on that one!

    You are facing three parties here, who operate on different levels. Unfortunately, with LE, Security, Medical, and other human interest fields of operations, they all have that obligation when performing their services, that yes even after employment they may be required to return to complete an unresolved issue. The employer (or previous) is not requiring your brother to go to court, the court is the one requiring it. So this is where your brother will not have any grounds with the previous employer.. its a part of the job when he took it, and knowing that after you leave, if you have been involved in any litigation, you may be required to return for court services. Just because we end our jobs at any time, doesnt mean the subject of violation gets to quit as well.. LOL.

    Out here, not only do I pay all my officers who go to court, but the courts also pay a "witness" fee. I let them keep it as incentive for doing a job well done. And even if it means OT, I will bite it and pay out of our budget, as its necessary to my officers. Not all employers operate on this level, and its their choice, not always is it morally correct, but to each their own.

    Tell your brother to look at this like its Jury duty, and the pride he gets to keep because he is doing the right thing!

    Long after I leave, if I am called to court (just as in the military), I will be there pressed and shined, as the service I performed at the time of my employment is still supported by the decision I made then. Its a responsibility thing!

    Best of luck!

    Leave a comment:


  • T202
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec
    I don't see how a company could get away with not paying overtime. I have always been on the clock while in court.
    I agree. Why work hard and make a lot of arrest if you have to go to court on your own time. The problem with securitysteve's brother is he is no longer an employee.

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  • CorpSec
    replied
    I don't see how a company could get away with not paying overtime. I have always been on the clock while in court.

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  • davis002
    replied
    Luckily, we get paid for court time.

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  • security steve
    replied
    How is that? He is required to go to court as a direct result of his activities in his job. If he did not perform those duties, he would have been fired. If he was still working for the company, he would have been paid. He went to court on behalf of the company. If he didn't go, they could lose the case and then be sued. Every company I have worked for has paid for court.

    A decent company would pay for the time he spent in court on their behalf. In fact, he had to leave his other job on a three hour lunch break (without pay) and drive to court to testify. I think there is something wrong with this picture. Also, most companies require their officers to testify in court when needed.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    There's no real reason to pay an employee for going to court. His activities on the clock are just that, on the clock. If he is summoned to court as a result of those activities, its his problem.

    Leave a comment:


  • HotelSecurity
    replied
    My hotel doesn't pay us for going to court. All we get is what the court gives a witness, bus fare & money for meals. This is one of the reasons I rather deal with a problem without arresting if I can.

    Leave a comment:

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