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  • Unlocking cars???

    On my job I am required to unlock cars that have had keys left inside of them. My company however has not trained me on this. I'm woried that one day I will be working alone and will not be able to provide this service. We have the small tool to do it, but I have no idea how to use it. Any help??? I heard that you should never open a car with side airbags??

  • #2
    Originally posted by BUCKSHOT
    On my job I am required to unlock cars that have had keys left inside of them. My company however has not trained me on this. I'm woried that one day I will be working alone and will not be able to provide this service. We have the small tool to do it, but I have no idea how to use it. Any help??? I heard that you should never open a car with side airbags??
    ROFL. So, if you damage the person's vehicle while trying to do this, are you the one who has to pay for it?

    Ask whoever is unlocking the cars to be trained. If they refuse, call your company and tell them that you have no clue how to do this, and the person who does will not show you.

    There are things you can destroy when opening cars. There are several types of methods for opening cars, too. You need at the minimum some sort of slim jim tool and a button reach tool.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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    • #3
      Most of the new models require something that looks like a long slim jim with a munipulator in the end. Something I think most companies are not going to supply. We don't do it because of the liability involved. You may get thier vehicle open but you may also do some kind of present or later unforseen damage later. We always ask. Do you have On Star? AAA? Ford Motor Service, Alltel Road assistance, etc. first. You would be suprised how many people do but don't want to use them or are to big of a hurry to do so. Some even don't know they have it. If a Road Ranger happens by we let them have it if they choose to do so. Other than that we stay away from opening vehicles. Unless it's someone in immediate danger, etc. That's were the maglite comes into play. Save lives, worry about liability later.
      My views, opinions and statements are my own. They are not of my company, affiliates or coworkers.

      -Being bagger at Publix has more respect these days

      -It's just a job kid deal with it

      -The industry needs to do one of two things; stop fiddling with the thin line and go forward or go back to that way it was. A flashlight in one hand and your set of keys in the other

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      • #4
        Same here. I had a vehicle that had its alarm going off. An "unopenable" vehicle, according to the owner. The property manager (a hotel) wanted the vehicle off property, now, and the locksmith was like, "Its a Mitsubishi, I can't open it." Locksmith came out on her dime.

        At that point, she was like, "I can't have this towed, I'll never be able to get it out. Can you just, you know, bust a window open or something?"

        ASP to the rear opera window. They called the police on my suggestion and the police noted their plate number and vehicle description, after all, the car now looked stolen.

        The only way I did that was after they signed a liability waiver.
        Some Kind of Commando Leader

        "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

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        • #5
          We do provide this service after a waiver is signed. You should get some training. Kits can be purchased for fairly cheap and so can different manuals.

          One of my officers brought up the deal with side airbags and stated that somebody was killed when the bag deployed and shot the slim jim through their throat.

          I did some research and found out that that was just a urban legend and that nobody has ever been killed opening a car with side airbags

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          • #6
            I wouldn't do it if I was you, you never know if your company is going to back you if you screw it up.

            A lot of police departments used to do this for people usually smaller departments. A lot of them wont do it any more, it's not like they teach you how to do it correctly at an academy. What I have heard is that a lot of places got complaints because the cops screwed something up in the door.

            Tell them to train you if that is part of your job.

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            • #7
              Except in a few VERY rare cases, I will only open a vehicle if a child is in danger inside the vehicle, e.g., An infant in a car seat in a locked car, windows up, on a sunny hot day. In which case, I won't sit there for hours trying to slim-jim the door... I will just bust a window if the owner consents.
              "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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              • #8
                We don't it

                We don't do vehichle entries period. We inform that they may to call a locksmith or their roadside assistance or whatever they use.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by davis002
                  Except in a few VERY rare cases, I will only open a vehicle if a child is in danger inside the vehicle, e.g., An infant in a car seat in a locked car, windows up, on a sunny hot day. In which case, I won't sit there for hours trying to slim-jim the door... I will just bust a window if the owner consents.
                  If a child's (or anyone's) life in in jeopardy I will bust the window whether the owner consents or not.

                  As far as a keys locked in car situation, it is against our policy, period. If one of my officers did it anyway, a write up would go into his/her file.

                  I did help a guy out one time. His keyless entry remote wouldn't work, and he couldn't get in. I suggested he use the key.
                  "Gun control, the theory that 110lb. women have the "right" to fistfight with 210lb. rapists. " Author Unknown

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                  • #10
                    A Locksmith warned me once. "do not ise a Slim Jim" on a car with electronic locks." It is very easy to knock a rod off of a pin, If this happens the whole door has to be taken apart to put it back together,
                    I enforce rules and regulations, not laws.
                    Security Officers. The 1st First Responders.

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                    • #11
                      We have a slimjim in the guard shack but we don't open the vehicles. The slimjim is there to hand to the employee who needs to get into his vehicle. We don't need to risk messing up something on someone's vehicle.
                      Hospital Security Officer

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Andy Taylor
                        I did help a guy out one time. His keyless entry remote wouldn't work, and he couldn't get in. I suggested he use the key.
                        Now that's hilarious!
                        "To win one hundred victories in one hundred battles is not the highest skill. To subdue the enemy without fighting is the highest skill." Sun-Tzu

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                        • #13
                          We do door unlocks at the college I'm at. I haven't done one yet and of course there is no training. We do have a guard who spent 27 years as a locksmith and is very good at getting cars open. The closet I did was when a fellow officer needed to get something into the back of his vehicle. He called on the radio to say he could'nt open the back doors because he thinks they are welded shut. I drove over, opened the front door to his car reached around and unlocked the back door. Problem solved.

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                          • #14
                            Lock outs

                            We leave that to AAA or the police for liability reasons. The police can run the plate and license of the individual requesting assistance to ensure that the car is actually theirs, registration and insurance are valid, and the person doesn't have any "hits" in NCIC.
                            Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

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