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  • Marchetti, David, M
    replied
    Originally posted by CorpSec
    "If it saves one security officer from being mistaken and not shot behind a building at 3:00 a.m. then it's worth it in my opinion".

    Not walking up on a car after you have no doubt that the driver has pulled a firearm after you high brighted him in your Neon would also go a long way in ensuring that nobody gets shot!
    Ummmm a two words - chicken ****. Your job doing security is to investigate why someone is behind your clients building at 3:00 a.m. unless your chicken **** or a do nothing guard.

    Leave a comment:


  • Marchetti, David, M
    replied
    Originally posted by SecTrainer
    Private policing is, and always has been, at least as critical to the life of this nation as the public police, and probably more so. You have a very great deal to learn and this board was the last place I ever thought I would see a post like this.


    SecTrainer well said, you Sir are a better writer then myself laughing, I guess in my 22 years of being in this industry I have done nothing in my life amounting to anything just being a lowly pathetic security officer. I know I am a big fat " 0 ", a loser, a wanna be dork, blah blah blah. I look at the source where the criticism comes from and ignore it for the most part as it comes from current or former police officers and the lackeys that follow them blindly. It's a good thing not everyone thinks like them as the name Hitler comes to mind. I have paid my dues and then some so I honestly don't care what they think.

    22 year veteran of the security industry in the State of Connecticut having held positions as a Security Officer, Investigator, Retail Detective, Lead Detective, Special Operative, Shift and Site Supervisor, and for the last 14 years he has owned and operated his own licensed security agency.

    Professional highlights include serving on a security detail that assisted in protecting then President of the United States Ronald Reagan when he visited the area, holding high level government security clearances issued through the D.O.D. Department of Defense, D.O.E. Department of Energy, DISCO , has been assigned to the C.E.O. of Sears, The Harlem Globetrotters, and currently heads up security for a prominent businesman overseeing physical assets in excess of 300 million dollars.

    Experience consists of Corporate, Industrial, and Manufacturing Facilities, Municipal Services, Elderly Housing, Education, Scientific, and Experimental Facilities, Private Residential Communities, Retail Operations, Mining, and other areas.

    To date approximately 28+ criminal arrests, one armed felony arrest while unarmed, reported 4 fires of non-client property, recovered 4 stolen vehicles, and prevented a forced attempted child abduction and saved several lives by direct intervention during criminal incidents.

    Brought federal civil litigation against a municipal police department who have engaged in illegal activity and conduct directed towards himself and employees to enforce civil rights.

    An open advocate for state and federal civil rights and the proper supervision of law enforcement authorities, State District Attorneys, and Judges in the State of Connecticut.

    While on duty he has been assaulted, struck by a tractor trailer, threatened with deadly force, spit on, stalked, and had his vehicles vandalized.

    Ohhhhhhh Godddddddd I'mmmmm Suchhhhh A Looserrrrrrrr Please God kill me now as it's better
    then being a Security Officer - NOT.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    "If it saves one security officer from being mistaken and not shot behind a building at 3:00 a.m. then it's worth it in my opinion".

    Not walking up on a car after you have no doubt that the driver has pulled a firearm after you high brighted him in your Neon would also go a long way in ensuring that nobody gets shot!

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by outofplacevikingfan
    no, great minds must think alike though.
    heh... Wasn't sure if you saw this topic on that other forum or not.

    Leave a comment:


  • outofplacevikingfan
    replied
    no, great minds must think alike though.

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by outofplacevikingfan
    Six officers have died this year, it's only 16 days in the new year. You can find this information on Officer.down. But according to Dave were all _______ not like the good old boys back in his time.

    You talk big about your experiences but it is not that impressive honestly. You always bring up that in 22yrs you've had 18 arrests, is that something to be proud of? What does that average a year? Oh yeah I'm sure you really took that police department to the cleaners in your federal suit. How is that mail inspecting law you want past going for you, I'm sure it's on the presidents desk right now. Just like I'm sure that letter that you wrote and interviewed yourself for is going to be taken real serious when it gets there.

    It's my first post so some of you may call me bad names but this is the reason the sometimes have bad attitudes of security.
    Do I know you?

    Leave a comment:


  • outofplacevikingfan
    replied
    Six officers have died this year, it's only 16 days in the new year. You can find this information on Officer.down. But according to Dave were all _______ not like the good old boys back in his time.

    You talk big about your experiences but it is not that impressive honestly. You always bring up that in 22yrs you've had 18 arrests, is that something to be proud of? What does that average a year? Oh yeah I'm sure you really took that police department to the cleaners in your federal suit. How is that mail inspecting law you want past going for you, I'm sure it's on the presidents desk right now. Just like I'm sure that letter that you wrote and interviewed yourself for is going to be taken real serious when it gets there.

    It's my first post so some of you may call me bad names but this is the reason the sometimes have bad attitudes of security.
    Last edited by outofplacevikingfan; 01-16-2007, 02:12 AM.

    Leave a comment:


  • CorpSec
    replied
    "I reported the suspect vehicles license plate, and proceeded to make an approach, when I saw the driver reach behind his back and take something out. I had no doubt the suspect pulled a firearm. Walking towards the vehicle I followed procedure and placed the door jam of the vehicle between myself and the suspect driver so I was not in a clean line of sight."

    Hmmm, you were sure the guy pulled a gun and still approached the car? That is incredibly poor tactics at it's best and blatant foolishness at it's worst.

    I had a nice laugh when I read your article. Why not just put your points down and send them in to the lawmakers? I don't understand why you embedded your thoughts in an article that amounts to nothing more than a conversation with yourself.

    Leave a comment:


  • mike booth
    replied
    Sec Trainer. I stand corrected.

    Leave a comment:


  • security steve
    replied
    Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
    What do you do when you nail a larceny and trespass suspect and he's in the custody of a new born infant?
    Heh, you crack me up.

    Proofread your postings, write in logical order, use an internet browser with spell check (Firefox or the new IE) and make sure your posts don't cause me to say "heh" unless you are telling a joke. How would he be in the custody of a newborn infant? That makes no sense. How about he has custody of a new born infant? How about there is a new born infant with him?

    I digress.

    Onto security criminals, read on.

    http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...2/ai_n16370967

    As a Walgreens security guard for six years, Sam Gwin Jr. wore a gun and a bulletproof vest to work every day.

    As a convicted felon, Gwin wasn't supposed to have either of those things.
    http://starbulletin.com/2002/03/13/news/story3.html

    According to the employment card, Royal Guard hired Hirakawa on Feb. 10, 2001, one week before he was released from prison.

    And a final one from Security Management Magazine (the article is a little dated). Scroll to the bottom to read "Security Officer Regulation: A Statutory Analysis"

    http://www.securitymanagement.com/library/000453.html

    Of the twenty-four states that check criminal history, all but one disqualify applicants who have ever been convicted of a felony. Most states that disqualify felons do so for all felons. Five states, however, disqualify felons only if the offense occurred recently, and four states prohibit security employers from "knowingly" hiring a felon.
    I could go on and on, but everyone else has already made Dave look like the buffoon he is.
    Last edited by security steve; 01-15-2007, 09:47 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • Charger
    replied
    I was thinking hot pink...

    Leave a comment:


  • N. A. Corbier
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
    Please give David a purple light!!!
    Purple looks too close to blue.

    David may get a green and white light.

    Leave a comment:


  • Lawson
    replied
    Originally posted by T202
    This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
    Please give David a purple light!!!
    hahahaha... that was the funniest thing Ive read all day.

    Leave a comment:


  • T202
    replied
    This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
    Please give David a purple light!!!

    Leave a comment:


  • Black Caesar
    replied
    Originally posted by mike booth
    From a career in Corrections, to Law Enforcement to Security, I've found the percentage of good, bad and indifferent co-workers to be pretty consistant. Bad Security probably just has less impact on the public good. What's the worst you can do? Sleep on the job? Pencil whip logs? Smoke on a non smoking post? You pulling anyone over? Selling protection? Stealing evidence? In Security?

    For what it's worth, seems to me even bad staff, public and private sector can be held to a higher standard in personal dealings, if you know how to stake out the moral high ground. If you are having too much trouble, too often, maybe you are doing something wrong!
    Well said man.

    And don't the truth hurt . Every person I've ever personally known (security, police, fire or civilian) who is constantly blaming someone else for their problems (like whinning about the police "being mean to them" lol) was some kind of "I can do no wrong" ego maniac with a chip on their shoulder. usually they had the kind of self defeating personality that led them into avoidable conflicts, then they'd shake their fists at an "cruel and unfair world" for hurting them lol.

    It's really sad. Me, I've been living on the same planet with these people, doing the same things (except for the obviously stupid stuff) my whole life, and never had a problem. But others..

    And example: I have, like everyone else, a wayward family member who is in and out of jail. Of course it's the cops fault, they just "keep stopping me because I'm black" and such. Never mind that he's been convicted for family violence assault, drug possession multiple times and likes to drive drunk and run from the police, it's all because he's black....

    We all know racism exists in human society, but for this kid, my own cousin, to belive there is some kind of specific conspiracy against HIM from multiple cops in multiple cities in 3 differant states???? No, that's not racism, that's called you being stupid. I don't talk to him much, but I always scold him and say "so the white folks let Oprah have all those millions, just so they can concentrate on keeping you down lol.

    Likie everyone else of that stripe regardless of race, gender or profession, he over-estimates his self worth by orders of magnitude. They do something dumb, the "man" stops them, and all of a sudden it's the "man's" fault. I've known at few Dozen security officers like this in my time in the business, and a few cops as well (it's more evident in Campus policing, given the nature of our jobs, there are some Tackleberry's working for Campus cop shops that actually cound't make it with municipal police forces, thankfully these types are a SMALL minority).

    Oh well Mike Booth, without people like Marchetti and such, who would we laugh at???

    Leave a comment:

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