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  • #31
    Originally posted by Mr. Security
    The postage system is functioning at capacity as it is. I get my mail later than ever. We have seen the cost for postage increase considerably over the last ten years. The principle behind tracking mail is sound, but this method is not feasible. Furthermore, I don't want my DL information with my DOB and address floating around for identity thieves. Some states use the SS number for a DL. GA did; not sure if that's current.

    Terrorist planners could easily defeat such a system by obtaining false ID or having low ranking members who are willing to sacrifice everything (9/11) do the mailing for them.
    Don't look at me, I just found that information in a relevant search, to see how much a simple google would bring up on him.
    Some Kind of Commando Leader

    "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by T202
      This is part of an article written by David A Smith a couple of years ago. It is reference training and licenses for security officers in Ct.

      "Participants should come out of this class with a solid understanding of what they can and cannot do under the law -- and most of it covers thing they cannot do," he said. "There are no special laws for security officers. Their job is to observe and report. In most instances, they're not allowed to even stop an individual, let alone frisk them or put them in handcuffs."

      This is the full article.

      http://www.jrrobertssecurity.com/sec...e-news0036.htm
      That's a damn good article.

      And it illustrates the right way to go, where as Marchetti's commentary shows the wrong way.

      The right way to go is in increments, small steps that lead to "the proper conclusion" actually existing before you call attention to it.

      What I mean is this: The Private Security Industry "self-polices" itself, raising standards without need of state mandates or new laws, attracting more professional people to the industry, and making private security a more lucrative option for Public saftey workers.

      (side note: right now, Private security is one of the VERY few private sector industries where the workers make less than their public counter-parts. For example, attorneys. Public Defenders and prosecutors and Judges can and most times DO make less money than attorney's in private practice. Same with the military, you can leave the service and go "merc" with some companies like Blackwater and make more money. Only in a very few cases can a rank and file public saftey officer leave public saftey to go private, and make more money.)

      After all that is done, THEN you can go to the lawmakers and say "hey, in this very dangerous world we live in, you already have a large group of well trained private professionals ready to do their part, how about some Statutory support so we can do that?".

      But in a State like Connecticut where the laws about private security have been almost pre-historic right up till last year it seems, where "Security Guard" is automatically a bad word, and where you've had some overzealous people in private security making everyone look bad, asking for more power right now is counter-productive. Mainly because it reinforces the "loser wannabe/needs an ego boost" image private security already has.

      Fix the industry from the inside 1st, then apporach Connecticut lawmakers about making things better for all.
      ~Black Caesar~
      Corbier's Commandos

      " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

      Comment


      • #33
        David, it seems to me you just hate all cops. As a police officer I have come into contact with good and bad security guards. I have also come into contact with good and bad cops. If you're looking for something you will almost certainly find it. I can drive around town in my squad car looking for a ****ty security guard and I'll find one. I am sure if you're looking for something negative in a police officer when they contact you you'll most certainly find it.

        Your posts seem very hate filled towards LEO's, almost as if you have some sort of chip on your shoulder. I don't know if an officer pissed in your wheaties one day or not. If so, you need to get over it cause they've done it to me too. This type of attitude does not help with the impression LEO's have of your industry. Fortunately, I know better. I know that there are some professional security guards and the bad ones give them all a bad name.

        You need to be less abrasive and try to "reach out" a little more.

        Comment


        • #34
          I don't think that David hates ALL cops. In fact, he explained earlier that he has some family and friends that are in LE. That having been said, we all need to remember that the police are worthy of respect because they are the secular authorities. Just because WE feel that someone in authority is unworthy of respect doesn't give us the right to be disrespectful to that individual, be it a parent, teacher, security guard, LEO, judge, etc.

          People that refuse to acknowledge authority are bound to suffer the consequences. David, you expect those under your authority to respect you, whether it's an employee or civilian on property you patrol. Similarly, the police expect you to show respect for the office that they hold, regardless of how you may view them individually.

          Using profanity to describe some police officers is simply not right. Why can't you see that?
          Security: Freedom from fear; danger; safe; a feeling of well-being. (Webster's)

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
            Ummmm cus some of them are just ___________________ ( fill in the blank ), they are Public Servants, not gods, not people to worship, they are schmucks just like me and you doing our jobs. Only difference is many NOT ALL have God complexes, are ego maniacs, and rather pompous as they feel they are entitled to special considerations as they are special being thje fearless protectors of our society. They are not plain and simple and their right to protect people and property is not exclusionary by any means as they are OUR little baby brother, I think it takes a lot of balls and ego mentality to think they are so special and exclusionary. And sad to say many in our society for various reasons place them on pedestal to a point that it supports their mentality. Shrugs.
            I'm sorry, but I have to disagree.

            In my years in this business, I've met MANY cops, from many different jurisdictions & departments. In that time, I can think of ONE Officer that I had any real problems with. After they had responded on a few of my calls, and seen that I'm not a 'retard,' as you put it, their attitude changed and they have been just as cooperative & friendly as all of the other Officers I've known.

            Obviously, I can't speak for the Officers in your area, as I've never been there. I do think, however, that you're never going to find that level of cooperation & respect if you allow this blanketed 'all cops suck' attitude you have to continue.

            I don't want to wax all religious in here, but it comes back to the golden rule. Treat others the way you want to be treated. I've seen it firsthand with other SOs I've worked with. If you treat the cops poorly, then guess what? They're going to give you the same treatment right back. Sure there may be some egotistical cops out there in the world, but going back through my memories, the number of ego-maniacal security guards I've met is MUCH higher. So it DOES go both ways.
            Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
            Originally posted by ValleyOne
            BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
            Shoulda called in sick.
            Be safe!

            Comment


            • #36
              Yup and security officers are perfect and don't commit any crimes

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
                A lot less than cops
                That's a pretty big claim there. Do you have anything to support this? Irreguardless of idiot police officers, background checks do weed out the felon at initial hiring in police work. Unlike security, where the states half-ass their background checks or leave it to the company to perform, who finds that way too much money and just calls the local Sheriff.

                Multi-national corporations have lost federal contracts protecting our military facilities because they gave federal protective services jobs to felons, and it took the military to detect this.
                Some Kind of Commando Leader

                "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                Comment


                • #38
                  From a career in Corrections, to Law Enforcement to Security, I've found the percentage of good, bad and indifferent co-workers to be pretty consistant. Bad Security probably just has less impact on the public good. What's the worst you can do? Sleep on the job? Pencil whip logs? Smoke on a non smoking post? You pulling anyone over? Selling protection? Stealing evidence? In Security?

                  For what it's worth, seems to me even bad staff, public and private sector can be held to a higher standard in personal dealings, if you know how to stake out the moral high ground. If you are having too much trouble, too often, maybe you are doing something wrong!
                  Booth

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by mike booth
                    From a career in Corrections, to Law Enforcement to Security, I've found the percentage of good, bad and indifferent co-workers to be pretty consistant. Bad Security probably just has less impact on the public good. What's the worst you can do? Sleep on the job? Pencil whip logs? Smoke on a non smoking post? You pulling anyone over? Selling protection? Stealing evidence? In Security?

                    For what it's worth, seems to me even bad staff, public and private sector can be held to a higher standard in personal dealings, if you know how to stake out the moral high ground. If you are having too much trouble, too often, maybe you are doing something wrong!
                    Mike, with due respect, I find that your post trivializes and betrays an apparently staggering ignorance concerning the role of the private police in our society, particularly in protecting the nation's critical infrastructure, which is 85% privately owned and protected. Also, the private officer polices most of the quasi-public space, such as malls, government buildings, museums, sports complexes, businesses, factories, etc. Private security protects people where they work, where they learn, and where they live and play. The public agencies do not, for the most part, police these domains and certainly do not prevent crime from occurring within them, except in the most peripheral sense. I say this as someone who has both training, work experience and education with respect to both sides of the "thin blue line", as it were.

                    Bad security, contrary to your assertion, has an enormous impact on the public's well-being, who spend most of their time in PRIVATE space, not in public space. So, I must say that your question, "What's the worst you can do?", followed by the trivial "answers" that you give, is one of the most unreflective posts I have had the misfortune of reading on this board. It might even be possible to make the case that bad security has a much greater impact than bad law enforcement. In fact, most writers on the subject of quality in security and law enforcement will agree that private agencies are much more sensitive to quality metrics than public agencies have been.

                    What's the worst you can get from "bad security"? Well, let's start with a successful attack on our nuclear power facilities, a mall (recent incident), or a power grid. How about the assassination of important public and quasi-public figures, the theft of critical industrial and defense secrets, an unmanaged leak at a chemical plant, or many more incidents of workplace violence than we do see? How about the fact that almost all fraud, commercial theft and most of the cybercrime in this country is privately investigated? After we deal with these "little" matters - all of which translate directly to the quality of life in our society - we can work our way down to the inane, and frankly insulting, examples that you give. I wonder why you think that the private security industry is projected to be a $130 billion industry in 2010...just a bunch of people who are smart enough to run $billion industries, wasting their money to hire donut-dunkin', log-pencil-whippin' idiots, I guess. Someone should wise them up!

                    Actually, someone should wise you up. Private policing is, and always has been, at least as critical to the life of this nation as the public police, and probably more so. You have a very great deal to learn and this board was the last place I ever thought I would see a post like this.
                    Last edited by SecTrainer; 01-15-2007, 06:35 PM.
                    "Every betrayal begins with trust." - Brian Jacques

                    "I can't predict the future, but I know that it'll be very weird." - Anonymous

                    "There is nothing new under the sun." - Ecclesiastes 1:9

                    "History, with all its volumes vast, hath but one page." - Lord Byron

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Marchetti, David, M
                      Look all I will say is this, a retired Lt. in the department has been arrested on a felony for stealing from his own men, commanding officers have been accused by P.O.'s of being drunk on the job, inmates have yelled for help as someone died in a cell and their calls were ignored, they will lie, make thinks up, submit applications for arrest warrants with perjured documents, at least one has been arrested twice for domestic abuse with the wife, and then again in a common street brawl, everything was reduced to a ticket. one was recorded in a hit and run by his own department video, they will " loose " evidence that can be used by defendants, lie in police reports, deal narcotics and act to protect drug dealers from arrest and proscution, one got nailed for telling a out of state criminal suspect how to avoid arrest by police in their area. Accused of beating suspects, this is a bad department. Just in the news this broke in the State of Connecticut:

                      Southbury, Connecticutª- A former state trooper finds himself on the other side of the law accused of threatening a state marshal. Tonight that ex-trooper is talking. Dennis Henderson says he did nothing wrong and that someone has a personal vendetta against him.

                      Videotape From Camera Catches Madison Connecticut Police Officer Joseph R. Gambardella Stealing From Business NEW HAVEN, CONNECTICUT – One night in October, a police officer in Madison, a small coastal Connecticut town, called in to dispatchers, telling them that he noticed a door to a restaurant had been left ajar. Not to worry, he said, he would check it out.In went the officer, Joseph R. Gambardella, though he did not use the usual protocol to search for an intruder, like reaching for his weapon or calling for backup, according to a state police officer who investigated the matter. Rather, Officer Gambardella, toting a large trash bag, went right for the freezer.Officer Gambardella rummaged through a few plastic tubs, according to the state police officer’s affidavit, removing a few packages of lobster meat.And out he went, closing the door behind him.

                      Bridgeport Connecticut Police Officer Douglas Bepko, Arrested For Assaulting His Girlfriend, Faces Added Charge After Violation Of Protective Order
                      Thursday, December 21st, 2006 BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUTª— Police Officer Douglas Bepko, facing firing in the alleged assault on his girlfriend Nov. 3, is being charged with another violation of department policy.After the assault arrest, Bepko was arrested a second time and charged with violating a protective order, sparking the latest departmental charge from Police Chief Bryan T. Norwood.

                      Settlement Against City And Disgraced Bridgeport Connecticut Police Officer Jason Altiero In Sight For Beating Woman While Another Officer, Jorge Laregui, Did Nothing To Protect Her Wednesday, December 20th, 2006 BRIDGEPORT, CONNECTICUT -ªA woman who claimed she was assaulted in 2002 by a since-fired city police officer while his partner looked on could receive a $40,000 settlement from the city.City Attorney Mark Anastasi has asked the City Council to approve a deal with Dolores Fonseca and her family, according to a proposal forwarded Monday to the Miscellaneous Matters Committee.

                      Hartford Connecticut Police Officer Franco Sanzo Convicted, Sentenced To Special Probation In Evidence Tampering Case Thursday, December 14th, 2006 HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT – A Hartford police detective arrested days after his retirement in 2004 on charges of falsifying an arrest warrant has been granted a special form of probation that could lead to his arrest record being expunged.The retired officer, Sgt. Franco Sanzo, was granted accelerated rehabilitation by Hartford Superior Court Judge Thomas P. Miano on Wednesday.

                      Connecticut State Police Allegations No Surprise, Considering Years Of Inaction In Investigating Bad Cops Monday, December 11th, 2006 HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT – Given the sad record of Connecticut government for most of the past decade, last week’s report on state police failures to properly investigate wrongdoing by its officers shouldn’t have come as a surprise. All the same, the independent study by New York State Police experts made for ugly reading. There were allegations of a state police officer running a “protection racket” for drug dealers, and troopers competing to see who could rack up the most drunken driving arrests, regardless of whether the arrests were legitimate. Other officers were accused of sexual assault, of using shotguns to intimidate civilians that irritated them, of associating with drug dealers and prostitutes, of faking overtime and stealing state property. The most disturbing finding was that senior officers repeatedly interfered with, manipulated or ignored internal affairs investigations. According to state Public Safety Commissioner Leonard C. Boyle, the state police had fallen into a dangerous habit of trying to handle such charges “informally.” Although the report makes clear that Boyle himself wasn’t blameless, he gets lots of credit for agreeing to push for an independent investigation of the crippled internal affairs system. There was also no doubt, given the cases cited in the report, that the department’s problems pre-dated Boyle’s arrival.

                      Now if your police don't operate like this then good for you, count your blessings. But here in Connecticut it's a diffrent life all together. These types of Police Officers I will have no respect for nor should you.

                      ROFL, atleast you're true to type, Marchetti. There are atleast what, 15,000 or so police officers (not counting Feds) in Connecticut, but like someone who is a part of some anarchist cop watching group or something, you offer up some articles about a few officers.

                      And then you wonder why the people and the lawmakers won't give you more "power" (and if you need more reasons, please refer to your 5th grade level "commentary" as additional proof).

                      I've known people like you my entire career (public and private). You're convinced that you know whats what, but don't know how foolish you sound when you talk about your many "arrests" and other heroic actions. Oh, and the trumpet blowing about public safety being "younger" than private security will surely make you friends among the people how could actually make thing better for people in private security, you know the people who write the laws....

                      In other words, everything you've posted here is a classic example of the pot insulting the kettle. But please, continue your anti-cop Jihad instead of looking in the mirror at your true enemy.....
                      ~Black Caesar~
                      Corbier's Commandos

                      " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        Originally posted by mike booth
                        From a career in Corrections, to Law Enforcement to Security, I've found the percentage of good, bad and indifferent co-workers to be pretty consistant. Bad Security probably just has less impact on the public good. What's the worst you can do? Sleep on the job? Pencil whip logs? Smoke on a non smoking post? You pulling anyone over? Selling protection? Stealing evidence? In Security?

                        For what it's worth, seems to me even bad staff, public and private sector can be held to a higher standard in personal dealings, if you know how to stake out the moral high ground. If you are having too much trouble, too often, maybe you are doing something wrong!
                        Well said man.

                        And don't the truth hurt . Every person I've ever personally known (security, police, fire or civilian) who is constantly blaming someone else for their problems (like whinning about the police "being mean to them" lol) was some kind of "I can do no wrong" ego maniac with a chip on their shoulder. usually they had the kind of self defeating personality that led them into avoidable conflicts, then they'd shake their fists at an "cruel and unfair world" for hurting them lol.

                        It's really sad. Me, I've been living on the same planet with these people, doing the same things (except for the obviously stupid stuff) my whole life, and never had a problem. But others..

                        And example: I have, like everyone else, a wayward family member who is in and out of jail. Of course it's the cops fault, they just "keep stopping me because I'm black" and such. Never mind that he's been convicted for family violence assault, drug possession multiple times and likes to drive drunk and run from the police, it's all because he's black....

                        We all know racism exists in human society, but for this kid, my own cousin, to belive there is some kind of specific conspiracy against HIM from multiple cops in multiple cities in 3 differant states???? No, that's not racism, that's called you being stupid. I don't talk to him much, but I always scold him and say "so the white folks let Oprah have all those millions, just so they can concentrate on keeping you down lol.

                        Likie everyone else of that stripe regardless of race, gender or profession, he over-estimates his self worth by orders of magnitude. They do something dumb, the "man" stops them, and all of a sudden it's the "man's" fault. I've known at few Dozen security officers like this in my time in the business, and a few cops as well (it's more evident in Campus policing, given the nature of our jobs, there are some Tackleberry's working for Campus cop shops that actually cound't make it with municipal police forces, thankfully these types are a SMALL minority).

                        Oh well Mike Booth, without people like Marchetti and such, who would we laugh at???
                        ~Black Caesar~
                        Corbier's Commandos

                        " "The trouble with Socialism is that eventually you run out of other people's money." ~Margaret Thatcher

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
                          Please give David a purple light!!!

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Originally posted by T202
                            This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
                            Please give David a purple light!!!
                            hahahaha... that was the funniest thing Ive read all day.
                            "Alright guys listen up, ya'll have probably heard this before, Jackson vs. Securiplex corporation; I am a private security officer, I have no State or governmental authority. I stand as an ordinary citizen. I have no right to; detain, interrogate or otherwise interfere with your personal property-... basically all that means is I'm a cop."-Officer Ernie
                            "The Curve" 1998

                            Comment


                            • #44
                              Originally posted by T202
                              This is a desperate plea to the legislators of Connecticut:
                              Please give David a purple light!!!
                              Purple looks too close to blue.

                              David may get a green and white light.
                              Some Kind of Commando Leader

                              "Every time I see another crazy Florida post, I'm glad I don't work there." ~ Minneapolis Security on Florida Security Law

                              Comment


                              • #45
                                I was thinking hot pink...
                                Corbier's Commandos - "Stickin it to the ninjas!"
                                Originally posted by ValleyOne
                                BANG, next thing you know Bob's your Uncle and this Sgt is seemingly out on his a$$.
                                Shoulda called in sick.
                                Be safe!

                                Comment

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